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American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians News  | June 24, 2015

IN THIS ISSUE

    1. House Approves IPAB Repeal; Senate Prospects Uncertain
    2. ASIPP Room Block Extended to July 6. Hurry Today to Get Your Spot! Board Review Course July 21-24 in Chicago   
    3. Room Block Extended to July 6 for ASIPP Controlled Substance Management, Coding, Compliance and Practice Management Courses in Chicago
    4. GAO calls for urgent action on government IT projects 
    5. America's Addiction to Opioids: Heroin and Prescription Drug Abuse
    6. Cannabinoid Offers Modest Relief From Pain, Spasticity
    7. Medical Device Tax Repeal Heads for Senate Showdown 
    8. Doctors charged in $700 million false billing takedown
    9. ASIPP Sends Letter to Novitas Regarding CRNA Scope of Practice
    10. Which State Raised the Smoking Age to 21?
    11. Stepwise Management of Opioid-Induced Constipation: A Focus on Targeted Interventions
    12. Commonly Used Drugs May Increase Risk of Heat-Related Illness
    13. Motion Sensor Biofeedback Improves Low Back Pain
    14. State Society News 
    15. Physician Wanted 
ipab

House Approves IPAB Repeal; Senate Prospects Uncertain

 

On Tuesday, the House voted 244-154 to approve a bill (HR 1190) that would eliminate the Affordable Care Act's Independent Payment Advisory Board, the AP/Miami Herald reports.

 

The vote fell largely along party lines, with most Republicans voting in favor of the measure and most Democrats opposing it (Fram, AP/Miami Herald, 6/23). According to the Washington Times, 11 Democrats voted in favor of the bill (Howell, Washington Times, 6/23).

 

California Health Online
chicago

ASIPP Room Block Extended to July 6. Hurry Today to Get Your Spot! Board Review Course July 21-24 in Chicago

 

 

Make plans today to attend the 2015 Board Review Course set for July 21-24 at the Palmer House in Chicago, IL. Register by June 19 to received discounted room rate.

 

This intensive and comprehensive high-quality review will prepare physicians appearing for the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS)-Subspecialty Pain Medicine examination and for the American Board of Interventional Pain Physicians (ABIPP)-Part 1 examination.

 

- A five-day review covering anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, psychology, ethics, interventional techniques, non-interventional techniques, controlled substances and practice management

- Unique lectures by experts in the field

- Extensive educational materials

 

 MEETING LINKS  |  REGISTRATION  |  BROCHURE  |  PALMER HOUSE  |  

csm

Room Block Extended to July 6 for ASIPP Controlled Substance Management, Coding, Compliance and Practice Management Courses in Chicago

 

The ASIPP Comprehensive Review Courses and Exams in Controlled Substance Management and Coding, Compliance, and Practice Management will be held in Chicago, Illinois, on July 22-24, 2015. Discounted room rate has been extended to July 6 or until sold out..

 

The Coding, Compliance and Practice Management is so beneficial to practices, both office-based and ASCs, that many physicians send their staff early to keep them current on the cutting edge aspects of practice management. These intensive review courses are designed to present interventional pain management specialists and other health care providers an in-depth review of multiple areas of interventional pain management-the areas we were never taught, yet are crucial for our survival.

 

 The course features many nationally recognized experts in pain management billing and coding and practice management as well as controlled substance management. In today's environment of regulations and litigations, you can't afford not to broaden your knowledge and refresh your skills in these areas.

 

Educational Objectives for Coding, Compliance, and Practice Management in IPM:

- Discuss documentation

- Review practice management topics

- Discuss coding and billing

- Examine compliance issues

 

CLICK HERE to register for Coding, Compliance and Practice Management Course 

 

Educational Objectives for Controlled Substance Management:

- Review basic science and core concepts

- Discuss pharmacology

- Identify clinical use and effectiveness

- Identify substance abuse

- Discuss topics with documentation, regulatory issues, legal issues, and ethical issues

 

CLICK HERE to register for Controlled Substance Management Course 

 

In addition to the review course, the American Board of Interventional Pain Physicians (for physicians) and the American Association of Allied Pain Management Professionals (for non-physicians) offers the opportunity for examination in order for physicians to obtain competency certification to and non-physicians to obtain associate certificates in Controlled Substance Management and Coding, Compliance, and Practice Management.

 

Click HERE to view brochure

 

Click HERE for Reservations at The Palmer House Hotel  

17 East Monroe Street, Chicago, IL 60603 | Phone: 312-726-7500

                           
gaoGAO calls for urgent action on government IT projects

The U.S government spends more than $80 billion on information technology every year - but many of the projects are riddled with mismanagement that results in underperformance. 

 

The Government Accountability Office, in fact, published a new report that found "federal investments in IT have often resulted in multimillion dollar cost overruns and years-long schedule delays, with questionable mission-related achievements."

 

While the GAO rattled off a list of top "failed investments" spanning many federal departments, the one particular to healthcare it mentioned is the Veterans Affairs contentious outpatient scheduling replacement project was on the list. Health and Human Services took a hit for Healthcare.gov, which GAO included among its "high-risk initiatives" that have "significant issues requiring attention." Also in that category: the VA and Defense Department's ill-fated iEHR initiative to modernize their electronic health records systems.

 


                           
americaAmerica's Addiction to Opioids: Heroin and Prescription Drug Abuse

Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control

 

Good Morning, Madam Chair and members of the Caucus.  Thank you for inviting the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to participate in this important hearing and contribute what I believe will be useful insights into the growing and intertwined problems of prescription pain relievers and heroin abuse in this country. 

 

Background

The abuse of and addiction to opioids such as heroin, morphine, and prescription pain relievers is a serious global problem that affects the health, social, and economic welfare of all societies.  It is estimated that between 26.4 million and 36 million people abuse opioids worldwide, with an estimated 2.1 million people in the United States suffering from substance use disorders related to prescription opioid pain relievers in 2012 and an estimated 467,000 addicted to heroin.[2]  The consequences of this abuse have been devastating and are on the rise.  For example, the number of unintentional overdose deaths from prescription pain relievers has soared in the United States, more than quadrupling since 1999.  There is also growing evidence to suggest a relationship between increased non-medical use of opioid analgesics and heroin abuse in the United States.[3]    

 

DrugAbuse.gov

                           
modestCannabinoid Offers Modest Relief From Pain, Spasticity
High-quality evidence on medical marijuana's efficacy lacking, experts say

 

Various cannabinoid compounds did not improve nausea, vomiting, or appetite, and only slightly improved chronic pain and spasticity, in patients with various long-term health conditions, a review of randomized clinical trials found.

 

The greatest reductions in chronic pain were reported by patients who smoked tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in eight of the trials, but the majority of the 79 trials in the meta-analysis demonstrated cannabinoids had little effect on HIV/AIDS patients with low-appetite and actually worsened chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting, Penny F. Whiting, PhD, of University Hospitals Bristol NHS in England, and colleagues reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

 

MedPage Today

                           

deviceMedical Device Tax Repeal Heads for Senate Showdown

 

WASHINGTON -- Last week the House voted 280-140 to repeal the medical device tax, a 2.3% excise tax charged to the makers and importers of artificial hips, pacemakers and other medical equipment. Now, the debate moves to the Senate where passage of the Protect Medical Innovation Act, the repeal bill's official title, is much less certain.

 

The medical device tax was implemented in 2013, and is expected to yield $26 to $30 billion in revenues over the next decade, which will be used to help finance other aspects of the Affordable Care Act, namely healthcare expansion.

 

MedPage Today

  
false

Doctors charged in $700 million false billing takedown

 

Last week's nationwide healthcare fraud takedown, the largest ever in the history of the U.S. Justice Department, included charges against 46 physicians, nurses and other licensed medical professionals.

 

In total, the three-day sweep led by the Medicare Fraud Strike Force in 17 districts alleges participation by 243 individuals in schemes that generated approximately $712 million in false billings.

 

Medical Practice Insider

                           

smokeWhich State Raised the Smoking Age to 21?

 

Hawaii is now the first state in the United States to raise the legal smoking age to 21, after Governor David Ige signed a bill on Friday. The law bans the sale of traditional and electronic cigarettes to anyone under the age of 21 in an attempt to curtail youth smoking; it is estimated that 86% of adult smokers in Hawaii started smoking before the age of 21.

 

Opponents state that it is unfair that 18-year-olds can serve in the military but not have the freedom to smoke if they do choose. The law will go into effect on January 1, 2016, with a $10 fine for the first offense and $50 or mandatory community service for additional violations.

 

CBS News

 

                           

constipationStepwise Management of Opioid-Induced Constipation: A Focus on Targeted Interventions

 

Opioids are central in the management of pain. In the United States, 259 million opioid prescriptions are written annually.1 Constipation and other gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances are two of the most common side effects, affecting 40% to 90% of patients taking opioids and adversely affecting medical adherence and quality of life.2

 

"Opioids are a double-edged sword," says William D. Chey, MD, Professor of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI. "Patients need these drugs to manage their pain, but the drugs have difficult side effects, of which constipation is one of the most bothersome."

 

EMPR.com

                           

heatCommonly Used Drugs May Increase Risk of Heat-Related Illness

 

HealthDay News) - Commonly used medications may increase the risk of dehydration and heat-related illness during hot weather, according to an article published online June 13 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

Noting that hot days are often associated with increased morbidity and mortality, Kerrie Westaway, Ph.D., from the Sansom Institute in Adelaide, Australia, and colleagues examined the correlation between medications and thermoregulation.

 

The researchers note that medications may increase the risk of dehydration and heat-related illness, especially in older adults taking multiple medications. Medications that are associated with increased risk of heat-related illness include antidepressants, anticonvulsants, antipsychotics, medicines with anticholinergic effects, diuretics, and benzodiazepines and opioids. Mechanisms by which medications may increase risk include diuresis and electrolyte imbalance; sedation and cognitive impairment; altered thermoregulation; decreased thirst recognition; decreased sweat production; and hypotension and reduced cardiac output.

 

 

EMPR.com

    

motionMotion Sensor Biofeedback Improves Low Back Pain

 

Changing a person's posture and movement using motion-sensor biofeedback reduces pain and reduces limitations in activity in patients with low back pain (LBP) compared with guidelines-based management, Danish researchers have found in a comparative effectiveness study.

 

Relative improvements on these outcomes in the movement biofeedback group compared with the guidelines-based group ranged from 15% to 27% at 3 months to 35% to 47% at 12 months, which were all above the threshold for clinically important difference.

 

 

MedPage Today

 

Hyatt 
     
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State Society News

  

 

WVSIPP Meeting Set for  Aug 13-16, 2015

The West Virginia Society of Interventional Pain Physicians will hold its annual meeting at the Eden Roc Miami Beach, Miami Beach, FL Aug. 13-16, 2015. For more information, go to www.painconfreg.info     


Save The Date! CASIPP Meeting set for October 2015
The California chapter of the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians   will hold its 6th Annual Meeting in Monterey, CA at the Monterey Plaza Hotel Resort over the weekend of October 16-18. Agenda and registration can be found online at www.casipp.com or by calling 661-435-3473. 

 

NY and NJ Societies to hold Pain Symposium Nov. 5-8

The New York and New Jersey Societies of Interventional Pain Physicians will host a Pain Symposium titled Evolving Pain Therapies on November 5-8, 2015 at the Hyatt Regency, Jersey City, NJ. Click HERE for Schedule and more information.
 

 

SAVE the DATE: FSIPP Meeting May 20-22, 2016

The Florida Society of Interventional Pain Physicians will hold its annual meeting in 2016 on May 20-22. The meeting will be held at the Orlando World Center Marriott in Orlando.

Watch FSIPP.org for more details.

 

 

 

 

 
Please send your State Society meetings and news to: Holly Long at hlong@asipp.org

 

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