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Impact Newsletter. Photo: Nancy McNally / CRS
By spring 2017, nearly 50 percent of the rural population in Zimbabwe may struggle to keep food on the table. Needs in other drought-affected areas — exacerbated by El Niño — are growing.

USAID's Dina Esposito saw our resilience and humanitarian work in affected communities firsthand when she visited Zimbabwe earlier this year. There, she met Anna Dumane, who had only harvested enough sorghum and millet to feed her family for up to three months. Running out of food was a daunting reality for Anna, but it was made less severe by a program that allows her to benefit from assets like community gardens and to receive an income and better access to food.

As environmental and other threats become more complex, increased investments in resilience and crisis mitigation are critical to sustaining development gains. But development dollars alone are not enough. Individuals, innovators, private and public sector partners all have a responsibility to act to support shared progress for a shared future. Learn more about USAID's efforts here.

USAID.GOV

Link to Multimedia: Extreme Possibilities Story Hub Multimedia: Extreme Possibilities Story Hub
Link to Multimedia: Girls in the Garage Multimedia: Girls in the Garage
Link to Video: Twice the Rice Video: Twice the Rice
Link to Photo Story: Healthcare on Wheels Photo Story: Healthcare on Wheels
Link to Blog: Carrying the Torch for Gender Equality Blog: Carrying the Torch for Gender Equality
Link to Transforming Lives: Greenhouses Build Resilience in Post-War Georgia Transforming Lives: Greenhouses Build Resilience in Post-War Georgia
Link to FrontLines: SoyCows in DRC, pickling in Lebanon and more FrontLines: SoyCows in DRC, pickling in Lebanon and more

Highlights

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A new vision for ending hunger: Food-Secure 2030


While in Kenya last week at the African Green Revolution Forum, USAID Administrator Gayle Smith launched Food-Secure 2030, a call to action by the U.S. Government to end poverty, hunger and undernutrition for good. Strong country leadership and more development assistance that mobilizes private sector investment will be key to our continued work to end poverty and global hunger in our lifetime.
Acting on the Call to Save Lives of #MomandBaby.  Photo: Thomas Christofoletti for USAID
Follow USAID at #GES2016. Photo: Bobby Neptune for USAID
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Securing Water for Food


Many people around the world endure drought, and two-thirds of the world could face water scarcity by 2025. Securing Water for Food: A Grand Challenge for Development has saved over 700 million liters of water and produced nearly 2,600 tons of food in low-resource countries, and is seeking more game-changing ideas. Are you up for the challenge? You can submit a new innovation for funding by Oct. 10.
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Ideas for Zapping Zika


Nearly 900 innovators submitted proposals to a USAID call for solutions to stop the spread of the mosquito-borne Zika virus. Winning ideas included low-cost sandals that repel bugs, a diagnostic tool that uses blu-ray technology to diagnose the disease, and infecting mosquitoes with a bacteria that can block disease transmission to humans. These innovative ideas hold the promise for a world free of Zika.
Refugee Stories All Around Us. Photo: AFP PHOTO / STR / Malaysia OUT
Meet Jerusalem's Peace Players. Photo: Bobby Neptune for USAID
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Find it in FrontLines


Did you know that USAID is working with entrepreneurs to modernize the ancient art of pickling in Lebanon? Or, partnering with the University of Illinois to increase production of soybean foods in Ghana to boost protein in kids' diets? In the most recent issue of FrontLines, discover these stories and more.
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Meet David, a Dad with a Turnaround


What does success look like? For David, it meant embracing new opportunities away from a life of drugs and gang violence in one of the world's most dangerous cities — San Pedro Sula, Honduras. Discover David's inspiring story on the USAID storytelling hub and learn more about our work to give people in Central America a second chance in this recent New York Time's article.
Meet David, A Dad With A Turnaround