In This Issue: Fall 2017

Trump

"President Trump's Populism:
Lessons from Europe and Latin America"


Friday, September 22, 2017 | Batts 5.108

9:00 AM-5:30PM


Last November, populist candidate Donald Trump unexpectedly won the U.S. presidency. Not since Andrew Jackson has the United States had a populist leader as chief executive. Observers were therefore at a loss as to what to expect: How would Donald Trump govern, and with what consequences? Would the new president manage to maintain or further boost his support with his polarizing, confrontational strategy, or would the difficulty of fulfilling his "wild" campaign promises soon leave him ever more isolated and vulnerable? How can the opposition effectively respond to him? Last but not least, will Trump's populism be contained by the checks and balances system, or will it damage democracy in the U.S.?
Given the U.S.'s fortunate inexperience with populism in government, country specialists have difficulty answering these questions. But many other nations, especially in Europe and Latin America, have had ample and long-standing experiences with populism.
This conference examines what lessons one can derive from populist movements and governments in foreign countries, such as those headed by Silvio Berlusconi, Hugo Chávez, Victor Orbán, Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, Marine Le Pen, and Carlos Menem. Can these experiences with populism help us understand the contours and likely repercussions of the Trump administration?
For more information or a link to the live stream, please visit the  Conference Website.
Free and Open to the Public
Sponsored by the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies, Center for European Studies, College of Liberal Arts, Department of Government, and Institute for Historical Studies in the Department of History

UTGrantsUT Faculty Funding Opportunities
Research Travel Grants
Due November 15th!


Available to any CES Affiliated Faculty for scholarly research dedicated to Europe. 

Two grants of $2,000 each are available for international travel and two grants of $1,000 each for domestic travel. These funds may be used for travel for research on Europe-related topics, although in some instances the funding may be used to attend and/or present a paper at a conference if the applicant can demonstrate that doing so will markedly enhance his/her work on a research project.

All travel must be pre-approved by the U.S. Department of Education and proposed itineraries submitted to CES at least thirty days before purchase of tickets. 

All travel must be completed and receipts submitted to CES by August 1, 2018. 

DEADLINE: The application is due by 5:00 p.m. on  Wednesday , November 15, 2017.

Click here f or a link to the application.
 
The 1-page proposal and short CV may be submitted electronically (e-mail to  ces@austin.utexas.edu) , but it is up to the applicant to ensure that all materials have been received by CES. If you do choose to submit the supplementary items via e-mail, please indicate this in your online application.


MSIGrants
MSI Faculty Funding Opportunities
Research Travel Grants

Available to any Faculty employed by a Minority Serving Institution (MSI) in Texas for scholarly research dedicated to Europe. 

Three grants of $1,000 each are available for international or domestic travel. These funds may be used toward travel for research on Europe-related topics, although in some instances the funding may be used to attend and/or present a paper at a conference if the applicant can demonstrate that doing so will markedly enhance his/her work on a research project.

All travel must be pre-approved by the U.S. Department of Education and proposed itineraries submitted to CES at least thirty days before purchase of tickets. 

All travel must be completed and receipts submitted to CES by August 1, 2018. 

DEADLINE: The application is due by 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday , November 15, 2017.

Click here for a link to the application.
 
The 1-page proposal and short CV may be submitted electronically (e-mail to  ces@austin.utexas.edu), but it is up to the applicant to ensure that all materials have been received by CES. If you do choose to submit the supplementary items via e-mail, please indicate this in your online application.

Global
Global Classrooms Curriculum
Integration Grant and Info Session


On September 22, the International Office will be hosting a workshop for faculty who are interested in directing a program abroad or leading a Global Classroom:
  Designing and Proposing a Faculty-Led or Global Classroom Program
Friday, September 22 th 2017, 2:00pm - 4:00pm
International Office, 2400 Nueces St.

Global Classroom Model
Global Classroom blends, either wholly or in part, a course at UT Austin with a course at an international partner university using online technology to connect students, foster collaboration, and facilitate co-teaching. Students receive credit from and pay tuition to their home university.
Courses can have a significant international online portion extending for the duration of the course, or can choose to connect digitally for specific topics or modules. Faculty are welcome to utilize both synchronous and asynchronous modes of connection, and are provided individual consultations with the Faculty Innovation Center to identify how to best integrate technology into the classroom.
Grants for Faculty
In partnership with the Faculty Innovation Center, the UT Libraries, Project 2021 and the School of Undergraduate Studies, the International Office  invites proposals from UT Austin faculty to develop  Global Classrooms in connection with an undergraduate course scheduled to be taught during the 2018-19 academic year.
The  Global Classrooms Curriculum Integration Grant competition will run for three years (2017-2020) and award ten fellowships of $5,000 - $10,000 annually. After their initial year of pilot funding, selected faculty are expected to continue their Global Classrooms course for subsequent years, beyond the duration of the grant. Any course in any academic discipline will be considered.
Application Materials
Applications for the 2017 - 2018  Global Classrooms Curriculum Integration Grant are due  November 1, 2017 at 5 pm.
The  call for proposals and  application form are now available.

For questions about the Global Classrooms Curriculum Integration Grant, please contact Ariel Travis, Special Projects Program Coordinator at UT's International Office, at ariel.travis@austin.utexas.edu

FLAS Updates
FLAS
CES 2017-18 AY FLAS Fellows

Congratulations to this year's graduate and undergraduate FLAS Fellows. 

Graduate Students
Jordan Bowers (Department of Anthropology)
Caitlin Carroll (Department of Sociology)
Michael Deegan (LBJ School of Public Policy/Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies)
Tracy Heim (Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies)
Mariana Sabino (Department of Spanish & Portuguese)
Maria Skouras (Department of Radio, Television, Film)

Undergraduate Students
Anastasia Bradatan (International Relations & Global Studies/Plan I Honors/Department of Asian Studies)
Daniela Cos-Pedraza (International Relations & Global Studies)
Margarethe Unger (Department of Germanic Studies/Plan I Honors/Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies)

Information about the FLAS Fellowships can be found on the CES FLAS web pages.

Events
Events

Measure for Measure
Presented by Actors for the London Stage

September 20 - 22, 2017 |  7:30 PM

B. Iden Payne Theatre, Kinship Building
 
September 23, 2017 | 7:00 PM
Winedale Theatre Barn (Round Top, Texas) 


Actors From The London Stage , now housed at the University of Notre Dame, is an educational and theatrical program that brings a troupe of five classically trained British actors to college campuses for week-long residencies featuring workshops and minimalist, electric, full-length productions of a Shakespeare play.
AFTLS returns to UT for an exhilarating week of workshops, related events, and three performances of  Measure for Measure on the UT campus and one at the Winedale Historical Center during the week of September 18-23.
Performances of  Measure for Measure will be held at the B. Iden Payne Theatre (in the  Winship Drama Building ) on UT Campus, Wednesday, September 20 - Friday, September 22 at 7:30pm. After these three performances on campus, the ensemble will move out to the Winedale Theatre Barn near (Round Top, Texas) for one special night. The Winedale performance will take place at 7pm on Saturday, September 23.
To purchase tickets for the UT performances, visit the Performing Arts Center website  at  or call 477-6060 or 1-800-982-2386.  Affiliated tickets may be purchased without a service charge in person at the Frank Erwin Center Box Office (M-F, 10 AM - 6 PM) and the Bass Concert Hall Ticket Office (M-F, 11 AM - 2 PM inside lobby and 2 - 6 PM outside ticket window). 
To purchase tickets for the Saturday, September 23 Winedale performance, please visit the  Shakespeare At Winedale website or call (512) 471-4726.


"Tiramisu for Two"
Free Film Screening

Friday, September 22, 2017 | 7:30 PM
CMB 4.122 Studio 4C


The Bernard and Audre Rapoport 
Center for Human Rights and Justice
Fall 2017 Colloquia Events

  
All events are from 4-6pm in the Sheffield-Massey Room at 
Texas Law unless otherwise noted.

For more information on each, please visit the Rapoport Center website .
 
  1. Rethinking the Future of Work: Law, Technology, and Economic Citizenship

    Brishen Rogers, Associate Professor of Law, Temple University


"Bodies and Ruins:
Imagining the Bombing of Germany,
1945 to the Present"
by David F. Crew
(History Faculty New Book Talk)

  
Wed, October 11, 2017 | GAR 4.100

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 

 
The History Faculty New Book Series presents:
(University of Michigan Press, May 2017)
by  David F. Crew, Distinguished Teaching Professor of History, UT Austin
Bodies and Ruins explores changing German memories of World War II as it analyzes the construction of narratives in the postwar period including the depiction of the bombing of individual German cities. The book offers a corrective notion rising in the late 1990s notion that discussions of the Allied bombing were long overdue, because Germans who had endured the bombings had largely been condemned to silence after 1945. David Crew shows that far from being marginalized in postwar historical consciousness, the bombing war was in fact a central strand of German memory and identity. Continue Reading...

No RSVP needed. Please  email cmeador@austin.utexas.edu  to receive a copy of the reading selection to be discussed.

Sponsored by: Institute for Historical Studies in the Department of History and The Center for European Studies


IHSOct23
"'Religious Persecution' in the
1917 Immigration Law and Post WWI Immigration to the United States"
by Yael Schacher
IHS Fellow, UT Austin, and Harvard University 


Monday, October 23, 2017 | GAR 4.100
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM 

About this workshop: Yael Schacher's paper analyzes the definition of "religious persecution" in the 1917 U.S. immigration law  and its application in cases of immigrants from the former Russian and Ottoman empires in the early 1920s.  Using immigraton interviews, legal cases, and social work files, the paper highlights the different ways  co-ethnic attorneys and advocates, immigraton officials and judges, and Jewish and Armenian women migrants represented wartime and postwar refugee experiences. Continue reading...

Free and open to the public. RSVP required. To RSVP and receive a copy of the pre-circulated paper, please  email cmeador@austin.utexas.edu  by 9 a.m., Friday, Oct. 20.

Sponsored by: Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies; Center for European Studies; Institute for Historical Studies in the Department of History


Russia
"The Wider Arc of Revolution:
The Global Impact of 1917" Conference


October 27-28, 2017 | TBA

The conference, "The Wider Arc of Revolution: The Global Impact of 1917", in commemoration of the hundred-year anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, will be held under the auspices of the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies at University of Texas, Austin, on October 27-28, 2017. The conference will feature two keynote speakers ( Sheila Fitzpatrick and Lisa Kirschenbaum ), and will consist of a series of panels convened over the course of two days in which we will discuss pre-circulated papers submitted by participants. 
The essays will be published in three volumes by Slavica Press as part of the transnational project entitled  Russia's Great War and Revolution, as well as in a special issue of the Journal of Contemporary History. The Slavica three-volume project on the global impact of the Russian Revolution rescues the history of the left from the history of Soviet communism. The revolution of 1917 brought not just the Bolshevik Party to power, but also made communism, a profoundly oppositional ideology into an ideology of the state. The merging of state and revolution resulted in the hybrid political structure that was the Soviet Union where the interests of the state, i.e. the consolidation of power, modernization, welfare, as well as the defense of geographical borders, collided with a universal ideology that aimed to represent all of humanity. As the Soviet state grew in power and the Communist International slowly subsumed independent left-wing organizations, the original impulses of anarchist, populist, religious and socialist thought, revolutionary consciousness and behavior, and the emotional networks of sympathizers, donors, and fellow travelers that sustained the ecology of the left in the nineteenth and early twentieth century never really died, but went underground, emerging in different locales in different guises. The fight was a long and bitter one and  in our conference the participants will consider the "the wider arc of revolution" in the twentieth century.
Keynotes:
Dr. Sheila Fitzpatrick: "Was the Russian Revolution a Failure?"
Dr. Lisa Kirschenbaum: "Reframing Slavic Studies and the Global Impacts of 1917"
  Continue reading...

Free and open to the public. 

Sponsored by: the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, the Center for European Studies, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, the Department of History, the Institute for Historical Studies, the Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies, the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies, the South Asia Institute, the Department of American Studies, the Department of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison


"'Panel Discussion:IHSNov2
500 Years of the Reformation:
Origins, Scope, and Impact"
 
Thursday, November 2, 2017
Tejas Dining Room
AT&T Exec. Education & Conference Center
4:30 PM - 6:00 PM 
 

Martin Luther had no intention of breaking with the western Church when he denounced the Church's sale of indulgences in October, 1517. Yet by 1600 the upheaval he set off with his 95 Theses had transformed the religious map of Europe. Today, Protestants account for about 40% of the world's Christians and they live across the globe. This panel discussion commemorating the Quincentennial of the Reformation will examine in broad strokes the events of the sixteenth century and their significance today. Continue Reading...


Free and open to the public. To RSVP to attend, please email:  cmeador@austin.utexas.edu

Sponsored by: Department of History; Department of Religious Studies; Center for European Studies; Institute for Historical Studies


"Getting  Together and Falling Apart:
Mikhail Tomsky and British Trade
Unionists during the 1920s"

Monday, December 4, 2017
12:00 PM 
GAR 4.100 

About this workshop: Mikhail Tomsky, who is best known as the chairman of Soviet trade unions and a member of the "Right Opposition" to Stalin in the Politburo, also played a central role in international affairs during the 1920s. Tomsky orchestrated one of the Soviet Union's few foreign policy achievements of the period, the creation of the Anglo-Russian Committee in 1924, linking British and Soviet trade unions together. Tomsky achieved this success by charming British trade unionists while holding his hardline Soviet critics at bay.  But his balancing act between the moderate trade union leaders in London, who proved open to his overtures in the mid-1920s, and critics of his pragmatic policies in Moscow following the failure of the 1926 British general strike, could not be sustained and the Anglo-Russian Committee collapsed in 1927. Continue Reading...

Free and open to the public. RSVP required. To RSVP and receive a copy of the pre-circulated paper, please  email cmeador@austin.utexas.edu  by 9 a.m., Friday, Dec. 1.

Sponsored by: Center for European Studies; Institute for Historical Studies in the Department of History



Center for European Studies  | The University of Texas at Austin
(512) 232-3470 | ces@austin.utexas.edu
http://www.utexas.edu/cola/european_studies/