In This Issue: November 2016

Faculty
UT Faculty Funding Opportunities
Research Travel Grants
Due November 15th!


Available to any CES Affiliated Faculty for scholarly research dedicated to Europe. 

Two grants of $2,000 each are available for international travel and two grants of $1,000 each for domestic travel. These funds may be used for travel for research on Europe-related topics, although in some instances the funding may be used to attend and/or present a paper at a conference if the applicant can demonstrate that doing so will markedly enhance his/her work on a research project.

All travel must be pre-approved by the U.S. Department of Education and proposed itineraries submitted to CES at least thirty days before purchase of tickets. 

All travel must be completed and receipts submitted to CES by August 1, 2017. 

DEADLINE: The application is due by 5:00 p.m. on  Tuesday, November 15, 2016.

Click here f or a link to the application.
 
The 1-page proposal and short CV may be submitted electronically (e-mail to  ces@austin.utexas.edu) , but it is up to the applicant to ensure that all materials have been received by CES. If you do choose to submit the supplementary items via e-mail, please indicate this in your online application.

MSIGrants
MSI Faculty Funding Opportunities
Research Travel Grants

Available to any Faculty employed by a Minority Serving Institution (MSI) in Texas for scholarly research dedicated to Europe. 

Three grants of $1,000 each are available for international or domestic travel. These funds may be used toward travel for research on Europe-related topics, although in some instances the funding may be used to attend and/or present a paper at a conference if the applicant can demonstrate that doing so will markedly enhance his/her work on a research project.

All travel must be pre-approved by the U.S. Department of Education and proposed itineraries submitted to CES at least thirty days before purchase of tickets. 

All travel must be completed and receipts submitted to CES by August 1, 2017. 

DEADLINE: The application is due by 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, November 15, 2016.

Click here for a link to the application.
 
The 1-page proposal and short CV may be submitted electronically (e-mail to  ces@austin.utexas.edu), but it is up to the applicant to ensure that all materials have been received by CES. If you do choose to submit the supplementary items via e-mail, please indicate this in your online application.


TLC
Texas Language Center's
Foreign Language Teaching Excellence Awards

The Texas Language Center sponsors the annual Texas Foreign Language Teaching Excellence Awards. Nominations are submitted by language students in the fall of each year. Awards are given to one professor or lecturer and one graduate assistant instructor based on their demonstration of the following: 
  • A commitment to teach foreign languages and cultures--and to do so with distinction
  • Superior knowledge of the language and culture taught
  • A passion for teaching
  • The ability to convey excitement about learning a new language and culture
  • The ability to impart knowledge while challenging students to delve more deeply into the subject matter
Please encourage your 2016-2017 language students to submit nominations using our mobile-friendly  online nomination form  before  February 1, 2017

FLAS Updates
FLAS
FLAS Fellowships & Info Session

FLAS Info Session
Monday, November 7
4:00 PM -  CLA 1.302D
Open to All

Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships are available to undergraduate and graduate students who are pursuing coursework with a European focus and an approved foreign language. Awards are offered for study in summer 2017 or the 2017-18 AY.

Applications for both summer and AY will be open November 15th with a due date of February 10, 2017.

For more information, please review our FLAS web pages and attend our information session where we'll discuss the awards and be able to answer individual questions.

FLAS awards are also offered by the South Asia Institute and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies (CREEES). Both will be present at the info session on November 7th.

FLASProfile
FLAS Fellow Profile: Javid Riahi

I am a second year candidate for a Masters in Middle Eastern Studies at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies. Here at UT, my geographical focus is on Iranian culture in diaspora. I am also engaged in Persian language studies aimed at achieving advanced proficiency. 

I have extensive experience conducting ethnographic research with monks in central Thailand, sexual minorities in Beirut, Lebanon, undocumented migrant workers congregating near retail areas in greater Los Angeles and with Iranian diaspora communities in the United States (Los Angeles and Austin) and Germany.  I spent the first year and a half of my undergraduate education studying in Madrid, Spain and working in wildlife rehabilitation. I ultimately obtained my bachelors in anthropology and interdisciplinary studies from Pitzer College. I completed a Fulbright Fellowship in Tajikistan where I worked with the U.S. embassy creating and implementing  English language programs for locals. While there, I initiated the city of Qurghonteppa's first organized volleyball teams, which continue to run. 

Before enrolling at UT Austin, I worked at Pitzer College's Community Engagement Center. There I created and supervised programming that bridged STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) fields with social justice, partnering with local organizations such as Wildhaven Ranch, Sidewalk Astronomers, and tutoring organizations in need of STEM tutors.

With this background, I plan to obtain a PhD in anthropology and become a professor. Amalgamating my interests in Middle Eastern studies and the anthropology of science, I intend to research the differences between how Persian and Western societies understand health, the body, food and the "Other".

My father, an Iranian immigrant, passed away when I was young. My mother raised my four siblings and I in Lake Arrowhead, a small town high in the mountains of Southern California.

When not attempting to deconstruct the world, I play volleyball, softball and get my two-step on.

FLAS (Foreign Language and Area Studies) Fellowship applications for the 2017 Summer and 2017-18 AY will be open in November 2016 and due in early 2017.

Announcements about specific dates and information about our Information Session (open to everyone) will appear in upcoming newsletters and on the  CES homepage.

Events
Russia
"Chekhov and Tolstoy: Writing Their Biographies and Translating Their Prose in the 21st Century"
A Talk by Rosamund Bartlett
Independent Translator, Biographer

Tuesday, November 1
5:30 PM
BUR 214

How should one tackle writing English-language biographies of Russia's great writers in the post-Soviet age?  Can immersion in the life of a writer assist translators of their works?  This talk will explore such questions through a discussion of the practical experience of writing biographies of Tolstoy and Chekhov while simultaneously translating their prose.  As well as showing the different ways in which, in this instance, this was a mutually beneficial process, the talk will touch on how the unusual nexus of biography and translation can throw up unexpected new avenues for scholarly research.
 
Rosamund Bartlett  completed her doctorate at Oxford and has held a number of university appointments, most recently at the European University Institute in Florence, where she held a Fernand Braudel Senior Fellowship.  She has expertise in Russian music, literature, and cultural history and is the author and editor of several books, including Shostakovich in Context and Chekhov: Scenes from a Life.  Her biography of Tolstoy was longlisted for the 2011 Samuel Johnson Prize, the UK's most prestigious non-fiction award.  She has also received recognition as a translator, having published two volumes of Chekhov's stories, an edition of his letters, and the first new translation of Anna Karenina for Oxford World's Classics in nearly a hundred years.


Sponsored by: Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies

Seven
"Seven Skeletons: The Evolution of the World's Most Famous Human Fossils"
A Book Talk with Lydia Pyne
UT Austin

Wednesday, November 9
3:00 - 4:00 PM
GAR 4.100

Over the last century, the search for human ancestors has spanned four continents and resulted in the discovery of hundreds of fossils. While most of these discoveries live quietly in museum collections, there are a few that have become world-renowned celebrity personas-ambassadors of science that speak to public audiences. In 
Seven Skeletons: The Evolution of the World's Most Famous Human Fossils (Penguin Press, August 2016), historian of science Lydia Pyne explores how seven such famous fossils of our ancestors have the social cachet they enjoy today.

Drawing from archives, museums, and interviews, Pyne builds a cultural history for each celebrity fossil-from its discovery to its afterlife in museum exhibits to its legacy in popular culture. These seven include the three-foot tall "hobbit" from Flores, the Neanderthal of La Chapelle, the Taung Child, the Piltdown Man hoax, Peking Man, 
Australopithecus sediba, and Lucy-each embraced and celebrated by generations, and vivid examples of how discoveries of how our ancestors have been received, remembered, and immortalized. 

With wit and insight, Pyne brings to life each fossil, and how it is described, put on display, and shared among scientific communities and the broader public. This fascinating, endlessly entertaining book puts the impact of paleoanthropology into new context, a reminder of how our past as a species continues to affect, in astounding ways, our present culture and imagination.

Lydia Pyne holds degrees in history and anthropology and a PhD in history and philosophy of science from Arizona State University. She has participated in field and archival work in South Africa, Ethiopia, Uzbekistan, Iran, and the American Southwest. She has published articles and essays in  The AtlanticNautilus, and
 Public Domain Review. She lives in Austin, Texas, where she is an avid rock climber and mountain biker. Dr. Pyne is a visiting research affiliate at the Institute for Historical Studies. Read more about her work at:  www.pynecone.org
"Describing human evolution through accounts of fossils that became media events might seem a publicity ploy, but science journalist Pyne pulls it off. [Pyne] casts her net... widely, adding captivating accounts of how each discovery fascinated the mass media and entered literature and popular culture."
-Kirkus Reviews (starred)
 
"Highly readable and an excellent title for armchair explorers with dreams of their own history-making discoveries."-Booklist

"Impressively blends the humanities and science to greatly enrich both."
-Publishers Weekly

"Ever wondered how we got here, and how we think we know?  Lydia Pyne takes us on a grand romp through some high (and low) points of the scientific discovery and cultural interpretation of the human fossil record, and along the way shows just how intimately the two are intertwined."
-Ian Tattersall, author of The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack and Other Cautionary Tales from Human Evolution
 
"How and why do some important fossils become famous and others do not? Seven Skeletons is a story about science, but also its impact in popular culture... remind[ing] us that context matters in shaping how we think about science and the past."
-Samuel J. Redman, author of Bone Rooms: From Scientific Racism to Human Prehistory in Museums
 
"As lively and readable as it is informative and instructive. By framing her account around the intimate history of seven individual hominid fossils, Pyne shows that paleoanthropology is about far more than dead and dry bones."
-Lukas Rieppel, Assistant Professor of History, Brown University

"A skilled historian and a lively, colorful writer, Lydia Pyne takes us beyond the headlines and into the archives, revealing intimate details of scientific investigation, discovery, marketing, and myth-making in the stories of seven of the best-known human fossils. Seven Skeletons is a sprightly, informative page-turner with a deeper message: the strange careers of human remains have much to tell us about how we use science to understand what it means to be human."
-Nathaniel Comfort, Professor of the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

No RSVP needed, however please  email Courtney  to receive a copy of the reading selection to be discussed.

Sponsored by: Institute for Historical Studies in the History Department; Center for European Studies

Selim
"Reflections on Language and Cultural Identity"
with Selim Özdogan
German novelist, writer, spoke-word artist

Thursday, November 10
3:30-5:00 PM
BUR 337




Header Photo: It's Europe. Up close.

Center for European Studies  | The University of Texas at Austin
(512) 232-3470 | ces@austin.utexas.edu
http://www.utexas.edu/cola/european_studies/