Summer 2017

CPR News and Research
Robert Bifulco & Judson Murchie: Assessing the Effects of Placed-Based Scholarships on Urban Revitalization: The Case of Say Yes to Education
Following the economic declines of the 2008 recession, many cities across the country have implemented programs designed to revitalize their resident populations. An example of such a program is the Say Yes to Education scholarship program, which was adopted in 2008 and 2012 by two large cities in upstate New York. As a place-based scholarship, Say Yes to Education grants tuition dollars to students based on their residence rather than academic accomplishments or financial need. In order to qualify for the scholarship, students must have resided in and attended a public or charter high school in the city for a set number of years. Advocates for Say Yes and similar place-based scholarship programs established in other cities hope that these programs can help to spur economic development in struggling central cities by providing families who would otherwise reside in suburban areas incentive to choose to live in the central city school district.

In their recently published article, titled "Assessing the Effects of Place-Based Scholarships on Urban Revitalization: The Case of Say Yes to Education," CPR researchers Robert Bifulco and Judson Murchie, along with their colleagues Ross Rubenstein (Georgia State University) and Hosung Sohn (Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs), attempt to measure the extent to which Say Yes to Education has attracted residents to two specific New York cities, Syracuse and Buffalo.
Amy Lutz: Examining Educational Inequalities in Two National Systems: A Comparison of the North African Second Generation in France and the Mexican Second Generation in the United States
With immigration on the rise in both the United States and Western Europe, many education scholars have become interested in examining the experiences of children of immigrants. These scholars are particularly interested in whether these children's experiences impact their educational attainment, choices, or school completion.

CPR senior research associate, Amy Lutz, and her colleague, YaĆ«l Brinbaum (Research Center for Employment), report on a study conducted to further examine the experiences of this particular population. Their research appears in the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies' recently published article, "Examining Educational Inequalities in Two National Systems: A Comparison of the North African Second Generation in France and the Mexican Second Generation in the United States." More specifically, these researchers explore the idea that, despite educational disadvantages, second generation minorities may experience positive secondary effects in education. Read more 
Katherine Michelmore: The Gap Within the Gap: Using Longitudinal Data to Understand Income Differences in Educational Outcomes
Many of our education programs are designed to alleviate resource deficits among low-income student populations. For example, many school districts across the country receive federal or state funding based on the number of students who are eligible for subsidized meals. In recent years, almost half of students across the country were eligible for subsidized meals, while only a quarter of students nationwide live in poverty. Policy and program creators must be able to gauge and measure the different levels of economic disadvantage amongst these students in order to target resources to more disadvantaged groups.

Lacking information about income, researchers typically use administrative data sets that use eligibility for subsidized meals as a proxy for poverty. In their recent article, "The Gap Within the Gap: Using Longitudinal Data to Understand Income Differences in Educational Outcomes," CPR researcher Katherine Michelmore, along with her colleague Susan Dynarski (University of Michigan), seek to find a more useful method for measuring economic disadvantage among elementary students. Read more 
 
Rebecca Schewe: Who Works Here? Contingent Labor, Nonfamily Labor, and Immigrant Labor on U.S. Dairy Farms 
With a growing body of research in the sociology of work and labor relations, many scholars have examined the relationship between unpredictable agricultural labor and the structure of farms that employ such labor, particularly the recent rise in immigrant farm workers. Most of the literature concerning this relationship exclusively considers the binary between "family farms" and "corporate farms," a division based on ownership and capital structure. Striving to expand upon this literature, CPR researcher Rebecca Schewe and her colleague Bernadette White (Syracuse University) have conducted research that answers the question, "should farm size also be considered when examining the relationship between farm structure and agricultural labor?" Read more
David Schwegman: The Impact of Georgia's Education Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax on the Fiscal Behavior of Local School Districts 
In recent years, local governments have found it increasingly difficult to raise a sufficient amount of revenue via local property taxes. Faced with state-imposed property tax limits and opposition towards highly salient taxes, many localities have begun to rely on alternative taxes, namely local option sales taxes. In Georgia, the state has allowed local school districts to adopt a special sales tax, known as the Education Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (ESPLOST). As with the implementation of any tax, policy makers seek to understand its effects and outcomes.

In their recently published article, "The Impact of Georgia's Education Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax on the Fiscal Behavior of Local School Districts," David Schwegman, a current CPR Ph.D student, and Eric Brunner (University of Connecticut), provide new evidence on the fiscal outcomes of Georgia's enactment of the ESPLOST tax. Read more
John Yinger: The Impact of State Aid Reform on Property Values: A Case Study of Maryland's Bridge to Excellence in Public Schools Act 
A central issue facing education policy makers is the discrepancy in funding and student performance between low- and high-income public school districts. In an effort to address this issue, many states have reformed their school finance systems to narrow gaps in school funding and education quality. In 2002, the State of Maryland implemented the Bridge to Excellence in Public Schools Act, which increased state funding to public schools by 75 percent between 2002 and 2008 and directed more funding to districts with many at-risk students. In their forthcoming article in Education Finance and Policy, "The Impact of State Aid Reform on Property Values: A Case Study of Maryland's Bridge to Excellence in Public Schools Act," CPR Senior Research Associate, John Yinger, along with the late William Duncombe and Il Hwan Chung, a former CPR graduate assistant, investigate household perceptions of this reform as indicated by its impact on the prices of single-family homes. Read more
Faculty in the Media
The New York Times
Leonard Burman (PAIA) was quoted in The New York Times article, "Do Tax Cuts Really Spur Growth? It Depends on the Details."  Read more  
Diverse Issues in Higher Education
Education Week
Amy Ellen Schwartz (PAIA/Economics) was quoted in the Education Week article, "Student Mobility Takes an Academic Toll. But Why?" Read more 
Daily Orange
Michael Wasylenko (Economics) was interviewed by the Daily Orange for the article, "Syracuse Hancock International Airport's Upgrade to Promote Syracuse Economic Development."  Read more 
Upcoming Events
September 14 - CPR Seminar Series with Angie Fertig (Medica Research Institute)

October 5
-Herbert Lourie Memorial Lecture on Health Policy with Gail D'Onofrio (Yale School of Medicine)

November 16 - CPR Seminar Series with Dylan Conger (George Washington University)

March 8 - CPR Seminar Series with Ingrid Gould Ellen (New York University)

March 26 - Paul Volcker Lecture in Behavioral Economics with Raj Chetty (Stanford University)

For more information about CPR events click here.  
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