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CPY Newsletter                                              February, 2015
   - Save the Date -
    A Call to Action
  •  E-cigs, Vape Pens, Hookahs are rapidly gaining in popularity
  •  Binge drinking more than triples from 9th to 11th graders
  •  Only a fourth of 11th graders see regular marijuana use as harmful
  •  Home is a key source where youth get alcohol, marijuana, and prescription drugs
  •  Rocklin youth care about their grades, their future, and what their parents think
NOW IS THE Time to empower our children to choose a healthy lifestyle free of substance abuse.
 
CPY is collaborating with Rocklin Police, Rocklin School District, Youth Commission, Hip Hop Congress among others to sponsor a community forum around rising issues of adolescent substance use.

Chief Ronald Lawrence, Chief of Rocklin Police Department, will be the keynote speaker. Local youth leaders will share their experiences and lead small group discussions.
 
Come join our effort. Hear what youth are saying. Learn about current substance use trends among Rocklin youth and how our community can come together to make a difference. Participate in the plan for action.

Mark this date:
March 26 5:30-7:30
Rocklin Event Center - Sunset Room

To learn more contact: Shari Crow (530) 886-5409 or scrow@placer.ca.gov 
Rx TAKE Back Event
Coming Soon - April 2015
Free Medication Take Back Event
 Watch for the Date
          
National Drug Facts Week
Take the Challenge Quiz

How do you and your kids stack up against parents and teens all across the Nation when it comes to your knowledge and understanding of Drug Use and it's effects on the teen brain?  Take the National Drug IQ Challenge and find out!
 
Follow the link below to take the Quiz
 
Changing the Future of Our Teens
 
The recent death of three high school graduates, killed by a 24-year old impaired driver underscores a critical need for prevention and raising parent awareness. How many parents might imagine that their child could become an addict or alcoholic and be the cause of such a tragic accident?
 
Kim Box, Executive Director for Pathway to Prevention, is strongly committed to educating the community on preventing teen drinking and drug use. In her words,
"the most dangerous sentence a parent can ever utter is "not my child."
 
Look on the Pathway to Prevention website for important information and resources. Download "Navigating the Teen Years: a Parent's Handbook for Raising Healthy Teens" for tips to guide parent/teen conversations. Like and share their Facebook page to help spread the word and resources.

www.pathwaytoprevention.org

Wish I could be a Cool Kid
Wish I could be like the cool kids cuz they just seem to fit in!

These lyrics from a popular song by Echosmith speak to the pressures on kids to be part of the "cool crowd" - the popular kids who seem to have it all together. But being cool in middle school often doesn't necessarily ring true for their future.

Researchers from the University of Virginia followed the lives of 184 adolescents popular with their middle school peer group from age 13 to 23. The study found that the cool kids were more likely to act older than their age, start dating early, experiment with drugs and alcohol, engage in delinquent activities, and pick friends based on physical attractiveness. By high school their popularity began to slip away.  

The study suggested that instead of focusing on building stable friendships during a critical developmental period, the cool kids were focused on attention getting behaviors that eventually do not lead to a successful future.  Ten years later their lives were not so cool. They were more likely to have problems in their social relationships, use alcohol or drugs, or engage in criminal behaviors.

Turns out that "being cool in middle school only lasts as long as the latest smartphone". Instead, being a good, supportive friend, hardworking and responsible builds character and lays the foundation for a successful future.

Parents - listen to the song lyrics with your young teen and talk about what being "cool" looks like among their peer group.  Challenge them to make better choices for themselves. It's not easy facing the pressures of middle school so having this conversation and offering support can help to build understanding and trust.

Wish I Could Be Like The Cool Kids song lyrics www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSCzDykng4g 
Juju Joints = E Cigs + THC
JuJu Joints are a luring new product that first hit the market about a year ago in Washington State. Jujus are electronic cigarettes that contain 250 milligrams of cannabis oil loaded with THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. The device is disposable, gives off no smoke or odor, and requires no charging batteries.
 
Each JuJu Joint contains 100 milligrams of THC, twice as much as a traditional joint, as well as propylene glycol, a chemical normally used to absorb water in foods and cosmetics, said Suchitra Krishnan-Sarin, an associate professor of psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine. We know very little about these products or what effects inhaling constant doses of this agent will have.
  
"In some ways, e-joints are a perfect storm of a problematic delivery system, the e-cigarette, and in addition a problematic substance, cannabis oil," said Dr. Petros Levounis, the chairman of the psychiatry department at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School.
 
According to Law enforcement agencies, teens are already using discreet vapor pens filled with cannabis oil and many are sure to lay hands on JuJu Joints. Thousands of postings by kids on Instagram boasts about how they are using e-cigarettes to smoke pot in the presence of their parents and at school, and getting by. Barbara Carreno, a spokeswoman for the Drug Enforcement Administration.
 
According to the latest Monitoring the Future Survey, 2014 marked the first year that more teenagers used e-cigarettes than traditional ones. The study also found that in the past year, 35.1 percent of 12th graders consumed marijuana, making it the most common illicit drug among high school seniors.
 
A recent local survey confirmed that the use of e-cigarettes among Placer County youth is on the rise as well. More students reported using e-cigs, vape pens or hookahs than cigarettes or marijuana.
 
To learn more about JuJu Joints - e-cig plus THC check out this article
 Hookah Use on the Rise Among High School Youth
One in five high school seniors have used a hookah to smoke tobacco and other tobacco like products, according to a new study published in Pediatrics.  Hookah bars, frequently found near college campuses, are gaining popularity with young adults.

A hookah pipe burns flavored tobacco and passes the smoke through water before it is inhaled.
  
The exotic flavors of "shisha" (a mixture of tobacco, molasses, and fruit used in hookahs) appeal to teens. There are dozens of flavors, including strawberry,lime, and chocolate. The social aspect attracts groups of young people gathering for smoking sessions that can last for hours.

Many think that smoking tobacco through a water pipe is safer than cigarettes, believing that the water filters out the harmful chemicals. In fact, Tobacco is just as harmful in a Hookah and is linked to the same health problems caused by cigarettes!
 
Many are not aware that Hookah smoke contains the same nicotine, tar and other toxic chemicals that cigarette smoke has and delivers it in higher doses. A typical hour-long hookah session, in which a person inhales several long, deep breaths of smoke, can equal as many as 100 cigarettes or more! Hookah pipes lack a filter found in cigarettes so the nicotine and chemicals enter the body directly increasing the risk of addiction and diseases. 

Also, the charcoal required for a hookah pipe emits carbon monoxide, carcinogens, and toxins, all of which increase the risk of cancer. 
 
Help your teen know the facts.
 
 
The Dangers of Vaping - NPR podcast
On January 21, National Public Radio's Morning Edition aired a program about the surprisingly high levels of the carcinogenic chemical formaldehyde produced by E-Cigarettes.  

David Peyton, a chemistry professor at Portland State University, referred to the chemical bi-product as masked formaldehyde because it appears in a form that could increase the chance it will be deposited in the lungs.
 
 
Researchers have discovered levels of masked formaldehyde at 5 - 15 times higher than what occurs in regular cigarettes, explained Peyton.
 
You can listen to a recording of this piece from NPR morning edition by following the link below
The Taylor House
Helping Young Women Transition from Foster Care
The Taylor House established in January 2012, is a non-profit transitional home helping former foster 18 - 21 year old girls who have aged out of the foster care system.  Taylor House offers affordable rents, teaches life skills, and counsels the girls on setting career and education goals. The program empowers young residents to become well-rounded, self sufficient and confident individuals.
 
The home can accommodate up to four residents and is located close to bus stop, library, shops and restaurants. Most of the girls come straight from a group home or foster care, and have never set up their own bank account or handled adult responsibilities. "It's really a stepping stone to their actual independence," said Lisa Peat, founder.
                                                                                               
There are more than 500,000 children in foster care in the United States, and about 20,000 age out each year.
 
The majority of these young adults leave the system without a place to live, and many become homeless.
 
The Taylor House Founder Lisa Peat sits on the steps outside the home she bought and remodeled in downtown Roseville for female foster youth transitioning to adulthood.
Philip Wood/Press Tribune

To learn more go to
Have You Taken? - The Parent Pledge
The Parent Pledge is entering its 5th Year of enrolling Parents, Guardians, Households and Families in our Campaign to do what ever it takes to STAND UP for Youth in our Community.
  
Please join the other responsible and dedicated individuals who have signed on to this important campaign!
  
Follow the link below to learn the details about what you can do to ensure that our
Community Continues to become a safer place for youth to learn, grow and become the young adults we all want them to be!

Support CPY
All tax-deductible contributions are applied directly to programs that benefit the youth of Placer County. Donors to the Coalition for Placer Youth can submit donations via check or PayPal.    
Events in February
Feb. 4th - March 11th
Family Addiction
Education Program
for anyone who loves an individual struggling with addiction
Wednesday Nights 6:30-8:30pm
Pathways Recovery
775 Sunrise Ave. Suite 100
Roseville, CA
(916) 735-8377
Feb. 26th
Rockling Partnership Meeting
3 - 5pm
Rocklin Police Department
EOC Room
Contact:
Shari Crow (530) 886-5409

March 26th

A Call to Action

for Rocklin Youth

Co-hosted by:
CPY & Chief Ronald Lawrence
Rocklin Event Center
Sunset Room
2650 Sunset Blvd.
Rocklin
RSVP requested:
(530) 886-5409 or
Refreshments provided
Teen Meetings
South Placer Teen Center
3860 Oak St. Rocklin
Fridays 7pm - 9pm
All teens welcome
Resources
Join the Conversation on Underage Drinking
http://www.alcoholfreechildren.org/
Answering your child's tough questions about alcohol
A Parent's Guide to the Teen Brain - Skills, Tools & Tips
HELPLINE: 
1-855-DRUGFREE
Parents Toll-Free Helpline
1-855-378-4373
Monday to Friday, 
10 am - 6 pm ET
(English and Spanish)
Time to Act
Think your teen is using?
Step-by-step guide for parents who suspect their teen is using alcohol or drugs
Teen Plan

PeerX
facts for teens about prescription drugs

Placer County Youth Commission
Placer Sheriff's Activity League (PSAL):
activities for youth - 
Mondays 2pm - 4:30pm
Wednesdays 3pm - 5:30pm
Fridays 3pm - 5:30pm
Rock Creek Elementary,Auburn    
Contact Detective Jason Davis
(916) 652-2422
Parent
Resources

The Partnership at Drugfree.org

Parent Tool Kit

www.theparentoolkit.org

Parent Pledge
www.parentpledge.org
handbook for talking with college students about the consequences of alcohol.
secure your medications safely and easily
locking cap dude
 
Small conversations can make a big impression
SAMHSA'S PSA campaign helps parents and caregivers start talking to their children early about the dangers of alcohol
Spanish Language Parent
Resources
HablaConTusHijos 
free, bilingual online resource
Bilingual Tool-Free helpline
1-855-378-4373
(Monday-Friday 10am-6pm EST)

Compromiso de los Padres

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