Fall 2016
topIn this  Issue
president_reportFrom the President
A Note from the Bottom

There's an old saying that the one who seeks to be first among us should be last, and with that old dictum in mind, I write this missive from "the bottom".  The bottom of what, one might ask? Well, right now I write from the bottom of a stack of abstracts. I am so very indebted to the Program Committee who labored through abstract upon abstract, trying to review them in the fairest way possible but at the same time to hold our own organization to quality standards. I am glad to be able to report that the abstracts are, as a whole, of very high quality and that we can look forward not simply to a fun convention in Kitchener/Waterloo, but an intellectually rich one.

Canada, and Waterloo in particular, has a lot to offer. Our faithful and noble Secretary-Treasurer Tom Sienkewicz and I visited just last month and found the hotel complex -- two very fine hotels almost across the street from each other -- to be superb. Both have lovely bars -- one of them an enoteca! And the Holiday Inn's complementary (sic!) breakfast bar is very nice, as are the heads of staff, Hivi and Anne. So, I guarantee you're going to love it. Not to mention the rich cultural heritage of the area, in part of Portugese descent, in part of German, all Canadian through and through.

Even now in the midst of our planning for a fun convention I would ask you to reflect for a moment that while we delight in the present and we look forward to the future, we must, like Aeneas leaving Troy, and should carry our past with us. This year saw the passing of two of our former CAMWS presidents, Ernst Fredricksmeyer and James Ruebel. Many of us knew these gentlemen personally, and feel their loss poignantly. In our classes and our research, we read about and ponder the value of human life on a regular basis. We know, too, the value and the power of memory. As our necrologist Ward Briggs will remind us when we gather, it is good and entirely fitting for us to remember these leaders for their contributions, not only to CAMWS and to the profession, but those unobserved contributions that certainly happened in their offices and classrooms where they shaped the lives of countless students, helping successive generations to love the classics as they did and we do.

In closing, I would like to mention that a new scholarship for archaeological fieldwork has been named in honor of Peter Knox, who was a prolific fundraiser for that scholarship. Let my congratulations here serve as harbingers of your own celebratory words to Peter when you see him in Kitchener. Ad astra per Canada!

Yours faithfully,
Alden

st_reportFrom the Secretary-Treasurer
Dear fellow CAMWS members:

I have just returned from attending the 96th anniversary meeting of CAMWS Southern Section in Decatur, Georgia, where we had great fall weather and an outstanding collection of papers by professors, graduate students and undergrads, and where our colleagues at Emory University were splendid hosts. At this meeting Davina McClain of Northwestern State University, the secretary-treasurer of CAMWS-SS, once again proved her herculean organizational skills as she almost single-handedly planned this meeting so well that it seemed to run itself. Davina has announced her plans to retire from this position after the next CAMWS-SS meeting in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, in the fall of 2018, so if any of you are interested in succeeding her as secretary-treasurer of CAMWS-SS, please contact her at camws-ss@camws.org. Many thanks to Davina for all her hard work and to all who read papers, exhibited, or contributed in any way to the success of this meeting.

I am happy to report that CAMWS has gotten off to a good start for the fiscal year 2016-2017, which began on July 1st, when Antony Augoustakis of the University of Illinois officially handed over the presidential gavel to Alden Smith of Baylor University. Antony continues to serve CAMWS well as the new editor of The Classical Journal. I am sure you will agree that his first issue of the journal, which was recently published, demonstrates that CJ continues to serve as one of the most important scholarly journals in the Classical world. And Alden Smith should be commended for his leadership in guiding CAMWS to express a strong statement of concern about the recent problems in Turkey. In case you missed this letter, you can still read it at https://camws.org/ExpressionofConcern. At this point in time there are more than 1100 CAMWS members -- about 100 more than this time last year. I attribute this increase in part to more Canadian members as we look forward to our 2017 meeting in Kitchener, Ontario, and to the attractiveness of the new membership benefit of access to the Loeb Classical Library On-Line. We are delighted that members are taking such great advantage of this benefit but we encourage those of you who have access to the Loeb On-Line through your institutions to use that form of access whenever possible. Since Harvard University Press bases the cost of our CAMWS subscription on total usage by our members, the more members can access the library by other means, the more economical it will be for CAMWS to make this access available to those members, especially in high schools and smaller institutions, whose only access to the Loeb is through CAMWS.

I am also excited that CAMWS is introducing several new awards this year: a faculty-undergraduate collaborative research grant and CAMWS awards for new teachers (including a student loan assistance award and a new teacher start-up funds award). The application deadline for the research grant is November 15, 2016, and the deadline for the new teacher awards is January 30, 2017. Please consider applying for one of these grants yourself or encourage others to do so.

Finally, I would like to mention how lucky I am to have such an agreeable president as Alden Smith to work with this year and such an excellent administrative assistant as Jevanie Gillen to make sure all the gears of CAMWS run smoothly. And thanks to all of you for your support of CAMWS through your membership dues and contributions and, especially, to all those members who serve the organization in various capacities, as officers, state/provincial and regional vice presidents, and as committee members. CAMWS could not function effectively without you.

Photo Highlights from
CAMWS Southern Section 2016
T. Davina McClain, SS Secretary-Treasurer, and her volunteers welcoming conferees.
Our CAMWS agora -- busy, as always
Recipients of CAMWS Manson Stewart Travel Awards to attend CAMWS-SS 2016
Eta Sigma Phi Panel at CAMWS-SS 2016
Consulares Ward Briggs, Herb Benario, Niall Slater, David Bright, and Christopher Craig at CAMWS-SS
Listening to Julia Langford's Presidential Address at the CAMWS-SS Banquet


CAMWS_AwardsCAMWS Awards
CPL Student Group Travel Award
CAMWS Travel Grants for High School Groups are designed for high school teachers who want to take their students on a trip to an excavation, exhibit or historic site(s) that both enhances their learning experience and furthers their interest in Classical Studies.  The grant supports both domestic and international travel.

In the academic year 2016-2017 $6000 is available for this purpose. Requests for funds up to $2000 may be submitted, but every effort will be made to share these resources in smaller amounts among as many schools as possible.

Proposals should include a budget, the dates of the projected trip and a detailed description of the planned activities, including a time line; proposals for support of participation in an excavation should include a letter from the excavation director detailing the students' responsibilities.

The proposals will be judged by Committee for the Promotion of Latin. Questions pertaining to the preparation of a proposal should be directed to cpl@camws.org.

Upon their return recipients of a CPL Travel Grant are required to provide documentation of their participation in the originally proposed activity, a brief report on the outcomes of the travel, including issues that may have occurred and that may be considered by the grant committee in the future, and a summary of this activity, including photographs, for publication in the CAMWS newsletter and on the website for the grant.

Applications for the CPL Travel Grant for High School Groups may be submitted by high school teachers who hold a current individual membership in CAMWS.

Application for the 2016-17 grants will be reviewed in two groups. The deadline for consideration for fall requests is September 30, 2016, and the deadline for spring and summer requests is January 30, 2017.

CPL Award for Outstanding Promotional Activity in the Schools
To support programs and activities in primary and secondary schools, the CAMWS Committee for the Promotion of Latin (CPL) annually recognizes with a plaque and a certificate the group which develops the most outstanding and effective activity for promoting Latin in CAMWS territory during each academic year (including the preceding summer). The winner of this award is announced every spring at the annual CAMWS meeting.

Projects supported by CPL grants are automatically eligible for this award.

Any other group wishing to compete for this award must be sponsored by a current CAMWS member and must submit a letter of application to the CPL chair at cpl@camws.org by January 30, 2017. The application letter must include a 100-word summary of the project and a more detailed project description not to exceed 500 words in length. Applicants are encouraged to attach supporting materials such as photographs, flyers, pertinent newspaper articles, etc.

Recipients are encouraged to accept this award in person at the annual CAMWS business meeting.

CAMWS Travel Grant for High School Groups
CAMWS Travel Grants for High School Groups are designed for high school teachers who want to take their students on a trip to an excavation, exhibit or historic site(s) that both enhances their learning experience and furthers their interest in Classical Studies. The grant supports both domestic and international travel.

In the academic year 2016-2017 $6000 is available for this purpose. Requests for funds up to $2000 may be submitted, but every effort will be made to share these resources in smaller amounts among as many schools as possible.

Proposals should include a budget, the dates of the projected trip and a detailed description of the planned activities, including a time line; proposals for support of participation in an excavation should include a letter from the excavation director detailing the students' responsibilities.

The proposals will be judged by Committee for the Promotion of Latin. Questions pertaining to the preparation of a proposal should be directed to cpl@camws.org.

Upon their return recipients of a CPL Travel Grant are required to provide documentation of their participation in the originally proposed activity, a brief report on the outcomes of the travel, including issues that may have occurred and that may be considered by the grant committee in the future, and a summary of this activity, including photographs, for publication in the CAMWS newsletter and on the website for the grant.

Applications for the CPL Travel Grant for High School Groups may be submitted by high school teachers who hold a current individual membership in CAMWS.

Application for the 2016-17 grants will be reviewed in two groups. The deadline for consideration for fall requests is September 30, 2016, and the deadline for spring and summer requests is January 30, 2017.

Excavation / Field School Award
The Classical Association of the Middle West and South annually awards three $2000.00 scholarships for participation in summer excavation or fieldschool at an archaeological site in the Greco-Roman world. Generally, one award will be made to a graduate student and another to an undergraduate, but teachers are also eligible for this award. Professional archaeologists are not eligible for this award.

To be eligible for this award, one must be a current member of CAMWS who either:
  • holds a teaching position in Greek or Latin in an elementary, secondary school or university within CAMWS territory; or
  • is enrolled as an undergraduate or graduate student in a degree-granting Classics program within CAMWS territory.
Priority for the award will be given to applicants who have not had previous excavation experience in the Greco-Roman world.

To apply for the 2016-2017 award this On-line Application Form must be received by January 30, 2017.

Recipients are encouraged to accept the award in person at the annual CAMWS business meeting and are expected to submit a written, illustrated report for the CAMWS Newsletter.

Note: An individual who wins this archaeology fieldwork award cannot also receive a Semple, Grant Award or Benario Award from CAMWS in the same year.

Please note that an individual cannot accept this award from CAMWS if he or she receives another award or scholarship for this fieldschool and the combined amount of these awards would be more than the cost of the fieldschool.

For further information, contact the chair of the Subcommittee on the Excavation and Field School Award at archaeology@camws.org.

Faculty-Undergraduate Collaborative Research Projects
The Stewart Undergraduate Awards Sub-Committee annually awards two research grants supporting collaborative research between a faculty member and an undergraduate. These awards can be for up to $1,000 each. Applications for 2016-2017 must be received by November 15, 2016.

Guidelines:

These awards are intended to support faculty research collaborations in Classics (any sub-discipline) with undergraduate students. Faculty-student pairs may be from institutions with graduate programs, but the student involved must be in an undergraduate.

Applications should include statements from the faculty and student researchers outlining the nature of the project, giving a prospective timeline for the project, an account of the respective responsibilities and intellectual contributions of faculty member and student, as well as a budget indicating how the money will be spent (the award covers such expenses as books, supplies, and travel for the student but not honoraria). The application should also indicate whether the project is receiving support from the applicant's home institution. Finally the application should describe what the research pair envisages the nature of the final product to be, and what contribution it is intended to make to the field. We encourage presentation of the projects at a future CAMWS meeting. The faculty member participating in this project must be a current CAMWS member at the time of application. The undergraduate does not. If awarded the grant, the undergradate will receive a complimentary membership in CAMWS for the year of the grant.

A final report is due to the CAMWS office at the end of the project (no later than a semester after the receipt of the award). The report is to include statements by both student and faculty as well as a summary report about the money spent. Any funds remaining are to be returned to CAMWS after the final report is submitted.

The award of up to $1000 will be paid to the Department or a suitable institutional office. The contribution of the faculty member will also be recognized by CAMWS (on CAMWS website, program, and by a letter sent to the faculty member's chair).


For further information, contact the chair of the Stewart Undergraduate Awards Sub-Committee at mas@camws.org.

CAMWS First Book Award
The Subcommittee on the CAMWS First Book Award asks for your help in identifying distinguished first scholarly books (or digital equivalents) in the field of classical studies (including, but not limited to, the languages, literatures, history, religions, philosophy, art, architecture, archaeology, economy, and reception of Greek and Roman antiquity) published by CAMWS members in 2014, 2015, or 2016. Self-nominations are encouraged. Please note that nominated authors must be members of the Association in good standing and for at least the previous year and that CAMWS has a separate award for pedagogical books (see Bolchazy Book Award). Please send nominations, including titles and publishing information, to committee chair Andrew Faulkner by email ( firstbook@camws.org).

The Committee will close its list for the 2016 award on September 1, 2016.

Books published after that date may be considered for the 2018 award.

The current committee's guidelines for awards include
  • excellent quality
  • wide significance within its genre
  • awareness of international trends in its field
All other factors being equal, the committee is looking for something that shifts the conversation substantially in the area covered by the book.

Recipients are encouraged to accept this award in person at the annual CAMWS business meeting.

Ladislaus J. Bolchazy Pedagogy Book Award
The CAMWS sub-committee for the Ladislaus J. Bolchazy Pedagogy Book Award announces a call for nominations for the 2017 Award. The recipient of this $500.00 award will be announced at the annual CAMWS business meeting, where the recipient is encouraged to accept the award in person. This prize has been named in memory of Ladislaus J. Bolchazy in recognition of his long career promoting classical scholarship and pedagogy.

The Subcommittee asks for your help in identifying distinguished works of pedagogy, including textbooks, handbooks, anthologies or other works primarily intended for the classroom in the field of classical studies (including, but not limited to, the languages, literatures, history, religions, philosophy, art, architecture, archaeology, economy, and reception of Greek and Roman antiquity) published by CAMWS members in 2014, 2015, or 2016. Preference will be given to language-based textbooks.The author of the nominated work shall be a member of the Association in good standing in the year of the nomination and for at least the previous year. Nominations may be made by any publisher or by any member of CAMWS in good standing, including the author.

Criteria:
  • appropriateness for the target student audience
  • clarity of presentation
  • excellent quality
  • effective pedagogical practice and design
  • potential for broad impact 
Nominations of pedagogical books should be sent to Helena Dettmer, chair of the Subcommittee on the Ladislaus J. Bolchazy Pedagogy Book Award at pedagogyaward@camws.org. The deadline for nominations for the 2017 award is September 1, 2016. Books published after that date may be considered for the 2018 award. The Subcommittee may, at its sole discretion, retain an unsuccessful nomination for consideration in the following year.

Publishers of nominated works are asked to send six (6) copies of the book to Dr. Helena Dettmer, 120 Schaeffer Hall, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1409 by September 1, 2016.

Manson A. Stewart Undergraduate Award
Teachers of undergraduate students are invited to nominate their most outstanding young Classicists for the CAMWS Manson Stewart Undergraduate Award. Every year CAMWS makes $1,000.00 awards (accompanied by a one-year membership in CAMWS) to a limited number of undergraduate students majoring in Classics at the sophomore or junior level at a CAMWS college or university. Nominees are expected to take a minimum of two courses in Latin or Greek (normally at least one per quarter or semester) during the junior or senior year in which the award is made.

Students are to be nominated by a department or program; no institution may nominate more than two students per year. The individual who fills out the nomination form on behalf of the department must be an individual member of CAMWS. Each nominee must fill out an application form, write a brief essay, and submit a college or university transcript and two letters of recommendation. Those who write the two letters of recommendations do not need to be CAMWS members. Applicants will indicate on their application the academic purpose for which they intend to use this award money (e.g., tuition, books, academic travel, etc.).

CAMWS is now accepting nominations and applications for the 2016-2017 Manson A. Stewart Awards. All nominations must be received by January 6, 2017Please note that a student can receive this award only once.

If you represent a department wishing to nominate a student, you can do so by completing this on-line nomination form.

Applications must be received on-line by January 30, 2016.

If you have any questions, please contact the chair of the Manson Stewart Undergraduate Award Committee at mascollege@camws.org.

The recipients of this award are announced at the annual business meeting.

Manson A. Stewart Teacher Training and Travel Awards
The Classical Association of the Middle West and South sponsors two Manson A. Stewart Awards for primary-, middle-, and secondary-school teachers, as well as graduate and undergraduate students. Recipients must be members of CAMWS.

Teacher Training Awards: Designed to provide some financial assistance to those who wish to obtain certification to teach Latin at the primary through the secondary level, whether the specific courses are needed in Latin or in Education. The award is not intended to cover all costs of the training, and the size of the award varies according to the actual costs (primarily tuition and travel), the size of the committee's budget, and the number of applications. Previous awards have been as high as $2050. To apply for a Teacher Training award, please fill out this on-line application. The deadline for applications is January 30, 2017.

Recipients are encouraged to accept this award in person at the annual CAMWS business meeting.

Travel Awards: Designed primarily to assist K-12 teachers with cash awards to offset the costs of attending CAMWS meetings, including the cost of a substitute teacher. Graduate students, contingent faculty and undergraduates preparing for a teaching career are also eligible for these awards, which are not intended to cover all costs of the travel. The size of the award varies according to the actual cost the travel will entail, the size of the committee's budget, and the number of applications. Preference will be given to individuals who have not previously received this award. Awards for travel to meetings have ranged from $150-$700; for travel to a Southern Section meeting, somewhat less. To apply for a Travel Award, please fill out this on-line application.

Deadline for grant applications to attend the 2016 CAMWS-SS meeting in Atlanta, Georgia is September 23, 2016.

Deadline for grant applications to attend the 2017 CAMWS meeting in Kitchener, Ontario is January 30, 2017.

Recipients are expected to accept this award in person at the business meeting held at the conference.

For questions about these awards, please contact the chair of the Subcommmittee for the Manson Stewart Teacher Training and Travel Awards, at stewartteacher@camws.org.

The recipients of this award are announced at the annual business meeting.

CAMWS Awards for New Teachers
CAMWS invites new K-12 teachers of Latin and ancient Greek to apply for the following awards:

Student Loan Assistance for New Teachers Award

The Student Loan Assistance for New Teachers award, worth up to $1000.00 which may be awarded to one or more successful applicants, is designated to offset student loan debt for recent baccalaureate or M.A.T. recipients who are entering the teaching profession. This award is designed to ease the transition into employment and to enable young teachers to perform effectively despite financial constraints. Eligible candidates will be Latin teachers at the primary or secondary school level with student debt from a recent B.A. or M.A.T. degree. Applicants must be within the first five years of teaching and be teaching at least two sections of Latin or ancient Greek. Applicants must supply proof of student debt along with a letter of application, a CV providing information of education and relevant employment history, a statement (no more than 500 words) detailing the applicant's accomplishments within the field of classics, a statement (500 words) detailing the applicant's teaching aspirations at his or her teaching institution and a letter of recommendation from the school. This award can only be received once.

The award will be granted on both merit and need-based factors. Merit will be evaluated on the basis of the applicant's graduation GPA, major field GPA, narratives of achievements in classics and teaching aspirations and the strength of the principal's recommendation. Need will be evaluated on the basis of total student debt. Preference will be given to an applicant with greater debt when other factors between applicants are evaluated equally.

Apply here on-line.

New Teacher Start-Up Funds Award

The New Teacher Start Up Funds Award is a start-up grant for new teachers designed to offset the costs of materials and supplies purchased for classroom instruction. Funds from the Award may be used to reimburse purchase of texts and research materials, classroom supplies, or classroom technology (including computer software or subscription fees for online materials) to be used in classroom instruction; the award may not be used for purchase of computer or tablet for personal use, however. The total amount of this award is $500 which may be awarded to one or more successful applicants. Eligible applicants are new primary and secondary school Latin teachers within the first five years of their profession. Applicants must submit a receipt of purchase for classroom materials, a letter of application that details the use of said materials for classroom instruction, and the educational goals to be met by classroom utilization of these materials, a letter of support from the principal, and a current CV providing information of education and relevant employment history. This award can only be received once.
  • Award for reimbursement of pedagogical and classroom materials.
  • May not include computer or tablet for personal use.
  • Books, promotional materials, art supplies for class enrichment activities, software or database subscriptions with clear classroom applicability.
  • Must be for durable goods, not consumable items (e.g., refreshments for a party).
  • Award will be given on basis of merit and need; merit will be evaluated on:
    • strength of narrative of how resources will be used (statement in letter of application uploaded as PDF or cut and paste)
    • strength of educational goals to be met with resources (statement in letter of application uploaded as PDF or cut and paste)
    • strength of the principal's recommendation
Apply here on-line for Start-Up Funds. 

Deadline for grant applications is January 30, 2017.

For questions about these awards, please contact the chair of the Subcommmittee for the Manson Stewart Teacher Training and Travel Awards, at stewartteacher@camws.org.

The recipients of this award are announced at the annual business meeting.

Edward Phinney Book Prize
The Classical Association of the Middle West and South has established the Edward Phinney Book Prize, to be awarded to any student receiving a perfect score (or coming closest to a perfect score) on the College Greek Exam.

After receiving his Ph.D. from the University of California Berkeley (1963), Phinney joined the Classics department at the University of Massachusetts in 1969, where he became an important advocate for educational technology and distance learning. With Patricia Bell he was the author of the Cambridge Latin Course. He died in 1996.

Since 2008, the College Greek Exam (CGE) has been providing a national exam for college students in Beginning Greek courses. The exam is administered in fall and spring to students enrolled in the second semester of elementary Greek. For information, reports and previous exams, visit www.dramata.com. In addition to the Phinney award, students compete for medals and ribbons.

To participate in the exam, contact the Chair of the CGE Committee.

The members of the CGE Committee are:
Wilfred E. Major, Chair (wmajor@lsu.edu
Antonios Augoustakis (aaugoust@illinois.edu)
Carolin Hahnemann (hahnemannc@kenyon.edu)
Mary Pendergraft (pender@wfu.edu)
Karen Rosenbecker (krosenbe@loyno.edu
Thomas J. Sienkewicz (tjsienkewicz@monmouthcollege.edu)
Albert T Watanabe (awatana@lsu.edu)

Presidential Award for Outstanding Graduate Student Paper
The Presidential Award for the Outstanding Graduate Student Paper is given at the Annual Meeting. Eligible are graduate students whose paper is accepted on the program and who will not have received their Ph.D. by the time it is read. The text of the oral talk is submitted at least one month in advance of the meeting and an ad hoc committee selects the winner. The award (with a prize of $200 plus a one-year membership in CAMWS) is presented at the annual business meeting, even though the winner may not yet have read it by the time of the meeting. Runners-up also receive a one-year membership in CAMWS.

There are two criteria for evaluation: (1) the quality of the scholarly argument, including the importance of the topic, the originality of the treatment, and the quality of mind displayed; (2) the effectiveness of an oral presentation, including the quality of the writing, good organization, and interest to an audience. Any graduate student whose abstract has been accepted by the program committee may submit a complete text of the paper for consideration for this award.

The paper submmitted for this award should be in the form actually to be delivered at the meeting (not a longer seminar paper on which the CAMWS paper is based). If a handout is required for comprehension of the paper, the handout must be included.

Those wishing to be considered for this award at the 2017 meeting in Kitchener, Ontario should submit their completed paper electronically to President Alden Smith at president@camws.org by February 20. 2017.

Download the promotional flyer.

Semple, Grant, and Benario Awards
These three awards offer graduate students and teachers of Classics (Greek, Latin, Classical Art and Archaeology and Ancient History) at the pre-collegiate (primary, secondary, or high school) level the opportunity to advance research and/or pedagogical interests abroad in Athens, Rome, or other appropriate ancient site.

The Semple Award is a $4,500 fellowship for attending the summer session of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. Award amounts will be applied toward and up to the program's cost of tuition, room, and board (airfare excluded).

The Mary A. Grant Award is a $5,000 fellowship for attending the summer session of the American Academy in Rome. Award amounts will be applied toward and up to the program's cost of tuition, room, and board (airfare excluded).

The Janice and Herbert Benario Award is a $3,000 fellowship that the recipient may apply to the summer travel (not fieldwork or conference) program of his or her choice. Award amounts will be applied toward and up to the program's cost of tuition, room, and board (airfare excluded).  The recipient of the Benario award must submit an itemized budget of program cost at the time of application.

To be eligible for a Semple, Grant, or Benario Award, one must be a current member of CAMWS who either:
  • holds a teaching position in Greek or Latin in an elementary or secondary school within CAMWS territory (camws.org/about/map.php);
  • is enrolled as a graduate student in a degree-granting Classics program within CAMWS territory (camws.org/about/map.php).
CAMWS members teaching at or students at a school outside CAMWS territory are eligible to apply for these awards if their schools are current institutional members of CAMWS (https://camws.org/about/im/index.php)

Priority for the Benario Award will be given to applicants interested in summer programs other than those of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens and the American Academy in Rome, which are normally funded by the Semple and Grant Awards.

An individual who wins a Semple Award or a Grant Award may not receive a Benario Award in the same year.

Please note that an individual cannot accept this award from CAMWS if he or she receives another award or scholarship for this summer travel and the combined amount of these awards would be more than the cost of the program and airfare.

The recipient of a Semple, Grant or Benario Award cannot also receive the CAMWS Excavation/Fieldschool Award in the same year.

On-line Application Form must be received by January 15, 2017.

Recipients of these awards are encouraged to accept them in person at the annual CAMWS business meeting and are expected to submit a written, illustrated report for the CAMWS Newsletter.

Questions regarding the application may be directed to the Chair of the Semple, Grant and Benario subcommittee at sgb@camws.org.

CAMWS Award for Special Service
The CAMWS Award for Special Service formally acknowledges exceptional promotion of classics and/or accomplishments for the profession in CAMWS territory. The award is given pro re nata.

Eligibility: CAMWS membership is not required. Recipients can be classicists or non-classicists who have made special contributions to the promotion of Latin and Classical studies, especially at the state and local level, in CAMWS territory. Ideal candidates include people involved in our field who do much for their local communities or classics in general, but do not interact frequently, if at all, at large meetings. Nevertheless, these people make MORE than a difference. Suitable candidates for this award also include parents or community members who support local Latin programs in notable ways; companies that donate money or other resources for the promotion of Latin; school administrators who help Latin teachers by giving access to school rooms or supplies or extra funds; newspapers or magazines that give free advertising for events; benefactors who give money for books or scholarships; or students who have promoted Latin in an original manner.

Nomination and selection process: Please submit a signed statement of nomination, 500-600 words in length, that describes the nominee and his/her work. Nominations for the award can be emailed to camws@camws.org (or mailed to CAMWS, 700 E. Broadway, Monmouth, IL 61462) but must be received by January 30, 2017. Supporting documents are not required, but they may be solicited if questions arise. The chair of the Steering Committee on Awards and Scholarships with advice from the five subcommittee chairs will then determine the winners. Announcement of the results will be made at the spring meeting. If you have any questions about this award, please contact the Chair of the Steering Committee, at steering@camws.org.

CAMWS Awards For Excellence In Teaching
CAMWS offers two awards for excellence in teaching. Kraft Award for Excellence in Secondary School Teaching recognizes outstanding teachers of Latin in public or private schools (middle schools included). The CAMWS Award for Excellence in College Teaching recognizes outstanding teachers of the Classics in college or university. Both full- and part-time teachers (who teach at least half-time with a minimum of five years teaching experience) are eligible for either award.  All nominees must be current CAMWS members.

These awards are made annually. The recipients are announced at the annual CAMWS meeting and each receive an award of $500. Honorees are encouraged to accept their awards in person at this meeting.

The nomination deadline is November 15, 2016. The deadline for receipt of all application materials is December 20, 2016.

For further information about the award for middle or high school teachers, please go to Kraft Award for Excellence in Secondary School Teaching. To make a nomination, go to this Online Nomination Form.

For further information about the award for college teachers, please go to CAMWS Award for Excellence in College Teaching. To make a nomination, go to this Online Nomination Form.

These awards are made by the CAMWS Subcommittee on Teaching Awards. The chair of this subcommittee can be reached at teaching@camws.org.

award_winnersReports from Previous Award Winners
ASCSA 2016 Highlights

by Richard Zaleski, 2016 Semple Award Winner

By receiving the Semple Award, I was able to spend six amazing weeks in the summer program of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. My session was led by the knowledgeable Prof. Denver Graninger. The program provided an up close, immersive exposure to the monuments, geography, and history of Greece. This experience has already proven invaluable in my graduate studies in the short amount of time I have been home.

We were primarily based in Athens, where we daily visited major sites from all periods of Greek history. We also had three major excursions to Crete, the Peloponnese, and Northern Greece. The different regions of Greece provided their own unique experience that is difficult to understand in a classroom setting. In particular, one cannot fully appreciate the vast difference in terms of topography and flora of Greece without traveling Greece in person. In all of these locations, Prof. Graninger emphasized not only the archaeological and historical aspects of sites, but he also drew particular attention to epigraphic evidence on the locations, as well as physical inscriptions located on site.

I was joined by a wonderful group of fellow scholars of the ancient Greek world from all over the United States and Canada. These colleagues made the experience all the more memorable. Were it not for this excellent collection of scholars, I would not have learned nearly as much as I did! All program participants had to contribute two site reports during the six week program. My reports focused on Prinias (an archaic site in central Crete) and the monastery of Hosios Loukas (a 10th-11th century monastery in Boeotia).

Several highlights of the trip stand out. We had the privilege of entering sites normally restricted to the public (e.g., the Parthenon, the temple of Athena Nike, the Temple of Zeus at Olympia, etc.). By entering into the classical sites themselves, I gained a greater appreciation for the monuments in their entirety in an uninhibited manner. Because I had encountered these sites only on the pages of books or photos online, physically going to the locations added new dimensions to my understanding of the sites and their history. We also had the unique opportunity not only to attend countless presentations by experts in various fields, but we were also able to interact with those scholars further back at Loring Hall (where the dining and sleeping facilities are for the American School) during our few hours of downtime. These unique experiences were made possible only due to our association with the ASCSA.

The opportunity was the trip of a lifetime! It would not have been possible without the support of the Semple Award! Not only do I have a much better understanding of the archaeology and geography of Greece, but I also forged relationships with generations of scholars. The knowledge gained in this program will benefit me greatly in my future career as a professor. I am eternally grateful to CAMWS for providing such generous assistance to allow me to attend the ASCSA summer program!
AAR-CSS 2016 visits Ostia
In An Aqueduct?

by Tara Ligon, 2016 Grant Award Winner

A wise mentor and colleague urged me to apply for the American Academy in Rome's Classical Summer School, saying "It will change your life!" While I completely expected to learn (and relearn) masses about ancient Rome, Roman archaeology, and Roman history -- and improve my minimal traveler's Italian -- how much I gained from participating continues to amaze me.

In my school, Walnut Hills High School in Cincinnati, all students in grades 7-9 learn Latin as a requirement of our Classical college-preparatory program. We have an average of 1600 students in Classics courses ranging from the required language classes to electives in Latin prose and poetry, AP Latin, Ancient and Medieval History, and Introduction to Archaeology. Including historical and cultural content in language classes not only makes traditional grammar-translation courses more interesting for students and give them greater depth of understanding about the ancient Romans, it's critical in helping children appreciate and relate to other peoples in our modern global society. Many students find these topics so interesting they continue in Classics beyond their requirements -- every year, some even choose to major in Classics at university!

Bulla
One of the many fascinating things about my CSS experience was discussing deeply interweaving literature, art, architecture and material culture into the Latin classroom. Our pedagogy seminar participants, most of whom are secondary or post-secondary teachers of Classics, shared insights into what has worked for them, including spoken Latin, Classical reception, comics and film, technology and travel. I'm already implementing some of their ideas this year: a graphic novelization of Jenney's rendering of the Aeneid as a way to interact really closely with the text while drawing -- in class! -- has had some really positive response already, and I'm excited about adding more material culture study, with optional reconstruction, to our Roman food project for Thanksgiving. Our visits to the Van Buren study collection, examining, handling and discussing authentic ancient objects, were a wonderful opportunity to consider how to give all of my students similar chances to interact personally with real objects.

Gabii; feels like 1000° F!
The site visits, including on-site lectures by Director Genevieve Gessert and Assistenti Jenny Kreiger and John Lansdowne, made me look with fresh eyes at sites I've seen before, and the thematic approach taken to studying the city's development though time lent a new perspective. Visiting the Forum area several times, focusing on separate areas and time periods, gives a much different impression than the typical tourist's one- or two-hour experience. I already knew it's best to have an adequate supply of water on-site, but our visit to the active excavation at Gabii convinced me that having an umbrella for shade on the hottest days is well worth finding space in your day-bag!

Inside the Aqua Traiana, beneath the American Academy
When speaking with my students about Rome and the Romans, I emphasize the many benefits of studying Latin and Classics: linguistic, critical thinking, and organizational skills, even math; art, literature, and engineering; and last but not least pizza, gelato, and cappuccino in a piazza, watching the Roman world go by. (You can now get your coffee porta via, to go, also!) Seeing a photo of Mrs Ligon inside an actual aquaduct makes their studies more tangible, until such time as they can visit themselves. Even in the few short months since my return, these ideas have led several of my younger students to start thinking very seriously about how they can make a trip to Italy a reality for themselves. Our department has organized a capstone field trip every year or two for decades, and my having had the opportunity to see Rome anew is compelling me to find new ways to make this kind of experience accessible for more students. My colleagues and I are establishing a scholarship fund to help the kids pay for it: anybody want to buy some artisanal olive oil for a great cause?
Music in the Time of Vergil

by April Spratley, 2016 Benario Award Winner

With the money from the Benario Fellowship I attended the "Music in the Time of Vergil," Symposium Cumanum 2016 organized by Dr. Timothy Moore. I had been interested in the theme of music in the Augustan poets for some years and had already been planning to write my dissertation on the topic. When I heard about the conference, I knew that it would provide the perfect opportunity for deepening my research. 

On the day that the conference began I made a brief excursion to the archaeological site in Cuma. I was struck by the spectacular acoustics of the Cave of the Sibyl; suddenly, ancient music came alive for me in a way that had never before happened. During the conference itself, held in the Harry Wilks Study Center at the Villa Vergiliana, I heard a variety of thought-provoking papers, all of which gave me new insight into some aspect of the poets' utilization of musical motifs and imagery in their works. The conference included a performance on a reconstructed tibia by one of the participants. I had, of course, heard recordings of pieces of ancient music before; yet, it was only through watching and listening to the live performance of the tibia that I could fully imagine the sound of ancient music. On the final day of the conference we visited the Archaeological Museum in Naples, which afforded me the opportunity to gaze upon some of the pieces related to music. The day after the conference ended, I made a brief trip to visit Pompeii. As I walked through the small and large theaters, it was a profoundly moving experience to imagine myself treading upon the same ground as the musicians and poets of the time.


The trip as a whole was enormously fruitful; I can truly say that I have never learned so much in so brief a period of time previously. The Benario Fellowship provided me with a life-changing experience that will enrich my academic and professional pursuits for many years to come.
Vetricella

by Patsy Craig, 2016 Excavation/Field School Award Winner

This summer, I was among twelve students who participated in the first collaborative archaeological field school organized by The Catholic University of America (CUA) and the American University of Rome (AUR). The students came to the introductory archaeology course from several programs of study: Classics, Medieval and Byzantine Studies, Early Christian Studies, and History. Directors Jennifer Davis and Lilla Kopar of CUA and Richard Hodges of AUR planned our two-week excavation at Vetricella, which is a ninth-century fortification at the foot of the Colline Metallifere on the Tyrrhenian coast in Tuscany. It was an ideal site for a first-time archaeologist because the stratigraphy was clear and the finds significant. We primarily uncovered pottery and animal bones, but the bigger finds included several iron tools. The excavation thus far indicates that the Vetricella fortification was anomalous during the early middle ages. Richard Hodges has tentatively proposed that it functioned as a trading post with the Carolingians, complete with silver kilns, iron kilns, and various craftsmans' workshops. If so, Vetricella calls into question formerly accepted theories about early medieval trade and settlement patterns (e.g. the "Tuscan model" posited in 2003 by Francovich and Hodges).

During the program, Emanuele Vaccaro and Arianna Briano, our Italian on-site directors, taught us how to recognize different types of pottery, to record and draw stratigraphic units, to compare data from a given archaeological site to larger historical theories, and to wield a pick-axe without straining our backs! During the first three days of digging, we primarily found 9th- to 11th-century pottery and animal bones, but African Red Slip sherds and even a piece of an Etruscan cooking pot turned up in the topsoil layers of the site. Once we reached levels untouched by modern ploughs, we learned to recognize the ninth-century layer from changes in the soil's color. We cleaned off the destruction level with trowels and brooms. One particular day brimmed full of finds. Dr. Hodges and Dr. Vaccaro were stunned by the two medieval iron locks uncovered within one hour. As Dr. Hodges explained to us, these rare locks indicate that the site was something distinctive, as only three other such locks have been found in Italy to date. The last few days of our excavation were spent drawing and photographing the stratigraphic units that we had uncovered and cleaned.

We also visited several other archaeological sites in Tuscany, in order to see the larger context of early medieval Italy and to understand how sites are preserved for educational purposes. Of special interest to the classicists were Populonia, Rocca San Silvestro, and Cosa. Populonia was an important Etruscan center for mining and iron-smelting. Etruscan tombs can now be seen near the coastline, although they were once covered by iron slag for centuries. A little further up the hill are the remains of the Roman city, where restorations of the huge temples and elaborate baths are under way. Much of the Roman road is perfectly preserved. At the top of the hill stands a medieval tower, built largely with spolia from the Roman temples below. Populonia, continuously inhabited from the Etruscan period to the present, demonstrates the gradual rise and fall of Roman domination, as well as being a prime example of the medieval tendency to fortify hilltops. On another trip, we entered a mine that had been used intermittently from the Etruscan period until the 1970s. The fortified medieval city where the miners lived, called Rocca San Silvestro, is situated at the top of the hill. Our last visit was to the Roman town of Cosa, founded in 273 BC. As a Roman site, it is anomalous because it lacks a fresh water source and because its sacred space stands at the top of a hill. By visiting these sites, we learned how archaeology contributes to our understanding of trade, settlement, and the gradual transition in Italy from the Roman period to late antiquity and the middle ages.

By participating in the Vetricella excavation, I gained a working knowledge of archaeological methods, and I am now better equipped to evaluate material evidence in my own research and to discuss material culture in teaching my classes. I would like to thank CAMWS heartily for allowing me to participate in this field school through their generous Excavation/Field School Award.

Herculaneum Graffiti

by Hannah Maddy, 2016 Excavation/Field School Award Winner

Walking into the archaeological site of Herculaneum is a breathtaking experience. With the entrance on an incline, the moment you step through the gates is remarkable. There's an ancient city laid out beneath you. If you progress farther down the incline and turn around, the view is even better. With Herculaneum in the foreground, you can see the modern town of Ercolano behind it and Vesuvius in the background. My whole time in Herculaneum with the Herculaneum Graffiti Project studying ancient graffiti was an incredible once-in-a-lifetime experience that would not have been possible had it not been for CAMWS' generous Excavation/Field School Award. I spent my senior year at the University of Richmond making a database of repeated carmina epigraphica in Pompeii and plotting them on a map with ArcGIS. So, it was really a great experience to see ancient graffiti outside of the CIL ( Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum) and in the field.

We split into teams by insulae (city blocks) and our work began right away, using the CIL and records from the 2014 Herculaneum Graffiti Project field season to know which graffiti to look for. We looked for any graffiti that we had reason to believe would still be there (a lot of the original graffiti from the CIL is not still there because the first volumes of the CIL were published as long ago as the middle of the 19th century and the weather has not been kind to ancient graffiti).We also kept our eyes out for ancient graffiti that has not been identified or recorded before. In the mornings, we worked in the field, scanning for inscriptions, measuring and recording details about each inscription, and taking pictures. We spent our afternoons doing digital work, updating databases, cataloging pictures, and tagging inscriptions to make them searchable on the databases. On our day trips to Oplantis and Pompeii, it was exciting to scan for ancient graffiti in these other sites, while learning more about Roman life in the Vesuvian area.

Besides the fieldwork, it was such a worthwhile experience to be around a group of such interesting, dedicated, and passionate students and professors. My team leader was very knowledgeable about the ancient world and was constantly sharing new information with us about the daily life and practices of the ancient Romans. It was incredible to think about the many lives that had made up this town and the temporariness of it all.

My favorite part of this experience was the digital work. It is so exciting to see the ways in which this information will be easily accessible to the public. I think that it is so worthwhile to make this information easily attainable by other scholars so that we may have many different and knowledgeable perspectives on how the ancients lived. It will be so incredible to watch this project grow over the next years and know that I played such an integral part. If you are interested in seeing what the Herculaneum Graffiti Project is up to, please check them out: http://ancientgraffiti.wlu.edu/hgp/.

Thank you CAMWS for making this incredible experience possible!

cplCPL Funds in Action
Dr. DiBiasie-Sammons taking student questions.
Ancient Graffiti in the 21st Century: New Approaches to the Study of Ancient Wall Inscriptions

by Amy Lather

On October 17, 2016, Professor Jacqueline DiBiasie-Sammons of Sewanee: The University of the South regaled Wake Forest University undergraduates and faculty with a fascinating presentation on the archaeology of Pompeii and Herculaneum. Beginning with an explanation of how the eruption of Vesuvius affected each town differently, Prof. DiBiasie-Sammons then focused the discussion on the thousands of graffiti that have been preserved in both cities. Producing numerous examples of ancient graffiti that ranged from the hilariously lewd to touching and romantic, Prof. DiBiasie-Sammons explained how this body of evidence offers uniquely rich insight into all aspects of Roman private life. Sadly, however, these ancient graffiti are in urgent need of better preservation and cataloging, and this is the purpose of the Ancient Graffiti Project, of which Prof. DiBiasie-Sammons is the field director. She shared some of the strategies and technologies her team uses in order to identify, record, and digitize graffiti, concluding with a presentation of the Project's searchable database, which makes these graffiti widely accessible to classicists and amateurs alike. The Department of Classical Languages was delighted to have nearly twenty undergraduates join us for this presentation, and we warmly thank the Committee for the Promotion of Latin for awarding us the Caristia Grant that enabled us to provide lunch for all participants.
Mount Vernon High School

by Mary Jo Behrensmeyer

On June 6, 2016, 13 students, two teachers and one adult chaperone embarked on a tour of Italy. Prior to the excursion, students chose sites in Mount Vernon with which to draw comparisons to classical counterparts. These included: the Mount Vernon football field and track, YMCA, the Farmer's Market, the Civil War statue on the square complete with a quote from Horace, St. Vincent de Paul Church, Wal-Mart, Memorial Theatre, the Rastin Tower (a smoke stack recently fitted with a spiral staircase), et al.

Upon arriving in Rome, we shuttled to Casa de la Salle, a Salesian Monastery, dropped off our bags and began the tour. With metro tickets in hand we headed to the Palatine Hill for a tour of palaces, an overlook of the Circus Maximus, and a view of Rome. On to the Colosseum with a walking tour inside, the students marveled at the size, the ruins, and the history entwined in this edifice. As always, the nighttime allowed for sidewalk cafes, the Trevi Fountain, the Colosseum and Forum in lights and the late night gelato.

Our "church day" took us the Immaculate conception Church with it crypt of bones, the Ecstasy of St. Theresa, the Pantheon, the Vatican Museum and a stroll down the halls of Roman marbles, and of course, St. Peter's. Then, more gelato.

Day 4 took us to Florence, the Uffizi Museum and the Birth of Venus, the Arno River, the Academy, Santa Croce, et al. That afternoon, we travelled to Pisa to tour the cathedral and climb the Leaning Tower. A late evening train brought us back to Florence and some Hard Rock Café.

Venice on our destination the following morning with a tour of a glass factory on Murano Island, St. Mark's Square, the proverbial gondola ride, and a true Venetian meal. The high speed train took us the following morning to Naples. Following lunch we headed for Pompeii, toured the ruins and studied the mosaics and frescoes, and yes, a visit to the brothel.

Day 6 took us to the Archaeological Museum of Naples and then on to Capri with a trek up to Villa Iovis and then a boat ride around the island complete with stops for swimming. Sorrento was our location for dinner and shopping and some well deserved relaxation.

On to Rome for additional sightseeing around the ancient ruins and monuments and an opportunity to draw their comparisons between something back home and a piece of antiquity. MAKE IT RELEVANT AND THEY WILL RESPOND.

Upon their return, students submitted cultural comparisons: the Farmer's Market with the Roman Forum, a temple with St. Vincent de Paul Church, the Rastin Tower with the Leaning Tower, the Memorial Theatre with the Pantheon, the Circus Maximus with the Mount Vernon track, etc. The support of the CAMWS CPL Travel Grant allowed for more experiences, musea, opportunities and adventures. We sincerely thank CAMWS for their support and know that the results of this project has been shared with the school boards of Ohio at their convocation in October.

VOBIS GRATIAS AGO 
Riverbend High School

by Mark Keith

On Thursday, April 14, 2016, fifteen Latin students and two chaperones from Riverbend High School in Fredericksburg, Virginia, set out on the nearly two-hour bus ride to see William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar. This trip was made possible by CAMWS' Travel Grant for High School Groups. This generous grant allowed us to pay for the costly transportation by school bus to and from the event, allowing the students to pay only for their individual tickets.

The students and chaperones boarded the bus after school and made our way to Staunton, Virginia. We built in enough time to wander the quaint downtown of this beautiful city and find a bite of dinner before the performance. The play itself, produced by the American Shakespeare Center at a reproduction of Blackfriar's Theater in London, was outstanding. Some students were even lucky enough to sit in chairs located on the edges of the stage! A good time was had by all and most agreed that they needed more Shakespeare in their life! 

Thank you, CAMWS, for your generous grant for helping to make this memorable event possible!


CJNew in The Classical Journal
SICYONIAN COMEDY 

by Matt Cohn

Abstract: Sicyon is famously associated with the origins of tragedy, but its connections to other dramatic genres are murkier. This article argues that the city was also connected to the invention of comedy on the basis of an epigram from the Garland of Philip by Honestus, Anth. Pal. 11.32 (=VIII Gow-Page). Most modern scholars suppose that the epigram ascribes the invention of satyr play to Sicyon, but I suggest that its description better resembles comedy. Sicyon's claim to comedy was probably a local tradition that was overshadowed by competing claims from other Doric states and Athens.

A CASE FOR THE READING "GAZA" IN CRINAGORAS ANTH. PAL. 9.284 LINE 3

by Ricardo Apostol

Abstract: The emendation "Gaza" in line 3 of Crinagoras Anth. Pal. 9.284 has not been widely adopted due to the city's purported obscurity. This paper argues that not only would Gaza have been well known to the inhabitants of Mytilene (the home town of Crinagoras), it would have been associated with Pompey's generosity to Greek cities on his return from the East. The emendation thus restores a measure of political edge to an epigram expressing outrage over Caesar's treatment of Corinth, and illuminates the nature of its panhellenic commitment.

SWEATING WITH BLOOD AND CIVIL CONFLICT IN DE RERUM NATURA

by Michael Pope

Abstract: Critics regularly note that sanguine sudare, "to sweat with blood," appearing twice in DRN, is striking and they offer some verbal parallels in other texts. The phrase and these parallels have not been investigated beyond these passing comments. In this article I examine Lucretius' use of the phrase within his poem and in other sources. I argue that the phrase, as Lucretius employs it, is multivalent in meaning and is a signal to his audience that evils are threatening Rome. By placing the phrase in conversation with similar and identical locutions found in war and teratological contexts, I show that Lucretius uses the phrase to induce his audience to consider the causes and consequences of violence and looming societal collapse. The phrase is more than a fine expression, it is for Lucretius another method to stimulate introspection and radical change among Rome's elite.

SERTORIUS BETWEEN MYTH AND HISTORY: THE ISLES OF THE BLESSED EPISODE IN SALLUST, PLUTARCH & HORACE

by Joseph McAlhany

Abstract: At a pivotal moment early in his revolt against Rome, Quintus Sertorius, a key figure in Sallust's fragmentary Histories, is tempted by the opportunity to sail away to the "Isles of the Blessed." Sallust's few fragments on these islands, when compared to Plutarch's more detailed description, reveal how the Roman historian, by emphasizing their place in the literary tradition rather than in the geography of the known world, constructs a commentary on two "histories": Sertorius' impossible position in his revolt against Rome, and the tragic political conditions of his own day. The echoes of Sertorius' illusory escape to a utopia in Horace's Epode 16, in stark contrast to Plutarch's rationalizing account, help bring to light both of these histories in Sallust's brief account of this episode.

TCLNew in Teaching Classical Languages

Teaching Classical Languages 7.2 now available 

The three articles in this issue exemplify what Teaching Classical Languages does best. The articles address a wide range of learners from middle school to advanced college students and explore the role of memory, sound, context, and purpose in crafting activities and assignments. The first by Jacqui Carlon, " Quomodo Dicitur: The Importance of Memory in Language Learning," reviews the literature on the role of memory -- both working memory and long-term memory -- in learning Latin. She not only defines the key terms, but also presents the major takeaways for language teachers. Finally, in an appendix she offers practical activities to enhance memory through meaningful communicative activities.

The second is a collaborative effort by researcher Barbara Hill, long-time middle school teacher Rickie Crown, and Baker Demonstration School middle school teacher Tyler Leach. Their article, "Latin at the Middle School Level: Who are our students? How do we reach them?" helps teachers understand the cognitive and developmental issues that middle school learners face while emphasizing the importance of phonemic and morphological awareness and breaking Latin words and sentences into their constituent parts. Throughout the article, readers will find a wealth of successful classroom activities.

The final article by Dave Oosterhuis, " Veni, Vidi, Vicapaedia: Using the Latin Wikipedia in an Advanced Latin Classroom," takes us on a journey through the process of developing an online project that involves research, writing in Latin, and explaining the contents and significance of Lucretius' De Rerum Natura. In the process, students become members of a larger Latin community and fulfill not only the Communications Goal but also the Communities Goal of the Standards for Classical Language Learning. In short, even though each article has a different target audience, reading all three will help teachers be more sensitive to learner needs and capabilities at different stages of the language learning process and offer creative ways to help students progress from novice to advanced Latinists. You can find these articles and more at tcl.camws.org.

Teaching Classical Languages 7.2
  • Jacqueline Carlon, "Quomodo Dicitur: The Importance of Memory in Language Learning"
  • Barbara Hill, Rickie Crown, Tyler Leach, "Latin at the Middle School Level: Who are our students? How do we reach them?"
  • David Oosterhuis, "Veni, Vidi, Vicipaedia: Using the Latin Wikipedia in an Advanced Latin Classroom"
And if you haven't had a chance to delve into the valuable articles from TCL 7.1, here is a reminder of the table of contents:

Teaching Classical Languages 7.1
  • Antonia Syson, "Close Readings in a Latin Dictionary"
  • Christine Albright, "Enhancing Latin and Greek Classes through a Convivium"
  • Ryan Sellers, "Oil for the Wheels in Teaching Caesar: Yesterday and Today"
  • Maxwell Teitel Paule, "Companions of Aeneas: Gamifying Intermediate Latin"
  • Special Section: "The Tirones Project: Perspectives on Mentoring Latin Teachers," with perspectives by Mary Pendergraft, Alison Orlebeke, Daniel Leon, Ben Burtzos, Katie Robinson and Kathryn Chew
camws_newsCAMWS News and Announcements
Honoring Jim Ruebel

A Proposal from David Bright

CAMWS was saddened to learn of the recent death of James Ruebel of Ball State University. Jim Ruebel was many things to our profession at large and particularly to CAMWS, as President, as scholar, indefatigable worker in and chair of committees, senior mentor to younger colleagues. As his long tenure as Dean of the Honors College at Ball State underscored, Jim was particularly committed to encouraging very bright undergraduates to reach higher in their studies.

As we now consider how we might best honor his decades of service, I recommend we establish a fund to support undergraduates presenting papers at CAMWS. Assuming 5% revenue, a fund of $18,000 would yield $900 p.a., which could support 3 grants of $300. (Undergrads have little chance of institutional support; $300 would be most helpful.) I would suggest crystallizing this as the Ruebel Undergraduate Award fund, and more clearly, the Ruebel Seminar as a standing feature of the program. Not all presenters would have to receive the stipend: the honor of being in the named session would further highlight their achievement.

$3700 has already between pledged to this effort.
2018 Panel in Memory of James S. Ruebel

Dear Consulares:

Greetings from Motown.  Some good news to report! Plans are in the works to have a session of papers in honor of our friend and colleague James S. Ruebel (1945-2016) at CAMWS's 114th meeting hosted by the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, April 11-14, 2018.

The panel will feature papers on topics that were of interest to Jim. He wrote his M.A. thesis on "Contemporary Theories in the Chronology of the Beginning of the Roman Republic," (University of Cincinnati, 1970) and his dissertation on "The Political Development of Cato Censorinus: The Man and the Image," (University of Cincinnati, 1972). He published essays on Cato and Scipio Africanus, Cicero and Milo, the ablative as adverb, Jerome's description of Lucretius, an edition of Book I of Apuleius's "Metamorphosis" (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000) and a reader concerning Caesar and the crisis of the Roman aristocracy (University of Oklahoma, 1994).

If you would like to participate, please send your abstract to me at aa3276@wayne.edu using CAMWS's standard submission guidelines. The deadline will fall at its usual time during the third week of August, 2017 with the exact date TBA.

Sincerely yours,
Michele Valerie Ronnick, Wayne State University 
Roundtable Proposals for Kitchener

Proposals for a round table discussion at CAMWS 2017 are invited. Topics could be pedagogical, professional, or scholarly; some might lead to panels or workshops the next year. These round tables will probably be scheduled during the noon hour on Thursday or Saturday or on both days, depending upon interest. A proposal consists simply of a title, a 100-word description of the topic to be discussed and the name(s) and email(s) of the person(s) who would lead the discussion. Please submit this proposal by November 14. Roundtable topics and organizers' names will be listed in the program. Roundtable organizers are still welcome to submit paper or panel abstracts or participate in a workshop at CAMWS. Go to https://camws.org/node/520 to submit your proposal.
Call for Nominations

On behalf of the CAMWS Nominating Committee Immediate Past President Antony Augoustakis announces a call for nominations for CAMWS president for the year 2018-19 and for member-at-large to the CAMWS Executive Committee for 2017-2020. Send nominations to nominating@camws.org by November 15, 2016.
Upcoming CPL Funding Deadlines 

For those of you who are high school teachers, please keep in mind that the spring application deadline for the CAMWS travel grant for high school student groups is January 30, 2017. For more information, see https://camws.org/StudentGroupTravelGrant.

Please consider applying for a Caristia or Bridge Initiative Grant. Many types of activities may be funded. For examples of activities and how to apply, see https://camws.org/cpl/funding/procedure.html.

Disce! Teachers' Group

There is a new Facebook group for teachers using the textbook ' Disce!' where we can share ideas, ask questions, upload documents, and more. Go to http://bit.ly/2dS098E to locate it, or scan the QR code below.

Facebook Groups are an ideal platform for discussion and for creating an online community. Members do need to have a Facebook account, but do not need already to be Facebook friends. Posts are focused on issues concerning the theme of the group. This group -- like many other professional groups -- is 'closed' but all you need to do is to request to join.

Colleges that use ' Disce!' are scattered across the country, so it is hoped that this group could support programs as we share with one another.

If you have difficulty accessing the page, or have questions, contact Caroline Kelly at ckelly@mitchellcc.edu.
institutional_membersFrom Our Institutional Members
THE 2017 BERNICE L. FOX CLASSICS WRITING CONTEST

sponsored by The Department of Classics at Monmouth College

Topic: A Figure from Classical History, Literature, or Mythology as the Next President of the United States

Make a pitch for a classical figure as president, or depict that person acting as president or on the campaign trail.

This contest is open to any student enrolled full-time in high school during the current school year. An award of $250.00 will be given to the author of the best entry written in English on the specified theme. The entry may be an essay, a short story, a play, a poem, or any original literary work.

This contest was established in 1985 by the Department of Classics at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois, to honor Bernice L. Fox, to promote the study of Latin and the Classics in high schools, and to recognize the good work of high school students.

Judging

The entry should make frequent, specific, accurate, and appropriate references to events from historical or other classical sources, and to contemporary circumstances. Papers will be judged on accuracy to ancient sources, appropriate use of those sources, originality, quality of material, thematic development, appropriateness, correctness of English style, and effectiveness of presentation.

Contest Guidelines
  • Entries must be typed, double-spaced, and on 8-1/2 x 11 inch paper.
  • Printing on both sides of a page is acceptable.
  • No electronic submissions.
  • The entry must fit the theme of this year's contest.
  • No minimum or maximum length is required.
  • The entrant's name and school must not appear on the entry.
  • Contestants should place a personal identification code (a randomly selected nine character series) on the top left-hand corner of every page of the entry and on a separate 8-1/2 x 11 inch sheet of paper, which also contains the following information:
    • author's name, date of birth, the student's personal identification code, school name, school address, teacher's name, and school phone number.
  • No more than ten entries will be accepted from any individual school, and only one entry per student.
  • Failure to follow these guidelines will result in disqualification.
  • All entries must be postmarked no later than March 15th, and mailed to Dr. Robert Holschuh Simmons, Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illinois 61462 (e-mail: rsimmons@monmouthcollege.edu).
  • All entries become the property of Monmouth College.
  • The winner will be announced on or by April 15th on the contest website.
  • Every entrant will receive a certificate of participation from Monmouth College.
  • For further information, including a list of previous winners, please consult the contest website (http://department.monm.edu/classics/Department/FoxContest/).

About Bernice L. Fox

 

Bernice L. Fox taught courses in English, Latin and Greek at Monmouth College from 1947 to 1981, and served as chair of the Department of Classics from 1970 till her retirement in 1981. Throughout her long and dynamic career she worked tirelessly to promote the Classics in Illinois high schools and colleges. She is also the author of Tela Charlottae, the Latin translation of E. B. White's Charlotte's Web. In 1991 Monmouth College conferred on her the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters. She died in 2003.

Tennessee Undergraduate Classics Research Conference
Call for Papers

The University of Tennessee's Department of Classics is pleased to announce its sixth annual undergraduate research conference. The conference will be held on February 25, 2017, and we are currently calling for submissions from interested undergraduates throughout North America. This conference will pertain to a wide variety of topics concerning the classical world, with paper sessions being divided by theme based upon the papers accepted. Abstracts will be considered from any discipline within classical studies (archaeology, history, philology, etc.) or from a related field. Examples range from a study of numismatics of Late Antique Mesopotamia to an analysis of friendship in Cicero's Pro Caelio, or an analysis of geography and ethnography in Caesar's de Bello Gallico. (This is not an exhaustive list).

Papers should take no more than fifteen minutes to present, with an additional five minutes dedicated to Q&A afterwards. Audio-visual equipment will be available for presenters. Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be submitted by November 14, 2016 to clasclub@utk.edu. For additional submission instructions, please see http://classics.utk.edu/ugcc.php. Notifications of acceptance will be sent on December 1, 2016. Please direct any inquiries to clasclub@utk.edu.


Living Latin in Paris
Medieval Latin in the City of Light
December 27, 2016 - January 3, 2017 

The Paideia Institute is currently accepting applications for Living Latin in Paris, an intensive Latin program designed to immerse participants in the Latin of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. For one week during the winter break, participants and instructors read and discuss selections from Medieval and Renaissance Latin literature associated with the city of Paris. Readings are enriched by daily visits to relevant sites in and around Paris. As in all Paideia programs, participants are encouraged to use Latin as an active, living language to communicate with their instructors and each other. No experience speaking Latin is required.

Please visit our website to apply or learn more.

Please direct questions to info@paideia-institute.org.

Living Latin in New York City 2017
Fordham University Law School at Lincoln Center
February 18-19, 2017

The Paideia Institute is proud to announce its fifth annual Living Latin in NYC conference, a two-day Living Latin and Greek experience in the heart of Manhattan, hosted jointly with the Fordham University Department of Classics. This conference, one of the largest active Latin gatherings in the world, is designed to allow teachers and students of Classics to explore and practice the active use of Latin and Greek. In the setting of Fordham University's Lincoln Center Campus, the program includes lectures on various aspects of active Latin and Greek pedagogy and workshops in which participants practice and observe spoken Latin and Greek techniques themselves. Daily coffee hours and one optional group dinner allow for informal contact and exchange with other participants and free Latin and Greek conversation. Professional development certificates and Continuing Educational Units are available.

This year, LLiNYC will feature a renowned group of guest speakers and instructors from all over the globe, including:

Justin Slocum Bailey, Indwelling Language
Jacqueline Carlon, University of Massachusetts Boston
Jim Dobreff, University of Massachusetts Boston
Alexis Hellmer, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Mexico
Nancy Llewellyn, Wyoming Catholic College
Matthew McGowan, Fordham University
Milena Minkova, University of Kentucky
Luigi Miraglia, Academia Vivarium Novum
Patrick M. Owens, Wyoming Catholic College
Daniel Pettersson, Stockholm University
Christophe Rico, The Polis Institute
Keith Toda, Brookwood High School
Terence Tunberg, University of Kentucky

Watch the Video!

The registration fee for the program is $125. This fee includes all materials as well as breakfast and coffee hour daily. Learn more about the conference and register via our website or by clicking the registration button below.

Thanks to the support of our donors and co-sponsors, CAAS and Fordham University, limited scholarships are available for students and teachers who would like to attend the conference, but cannot do so for financial reasons. Requests for scholarships should be sent to info@paideia-institute.org and will be considered on a first come first served basis.

SCRIBO: An International Composition Contest

Registration opens on December 1, 2016. Click here to register!

SCRIBO is an international Latin composition contest, designed to:
  • spur interest and excitement in using Latin for creative writing
  • provide teachers with high quality materials in Latin to read in their classes
  • honor and recognize top work in Latin creative writing
Students of Latin in any grade, from kindergarten through college, may participate. Entries will be sorted into the following levels, which are based on length of time studying Latin and content of the course: Exploratory, Lower, and Upper. (See the rules for a complete description of these levels.)

Entries

Students may submit original short stories, comics, and poems. Illustrations are encouraged but not required for all entries. All entries must have a maximum of 1,000 words and a maximum of ten pages (no larger than 8.5 x 11"). Click here to view sample entries from previous years. All entries must be submitted electronically by the teacher in PDF format via our website. The cost for submitting entries varies by how many students participate:
  • School Fee: $20
  • Each Student: $5 (maximum 25 students per school)
  • Discounts:  Title-1 Schools (25%), Homeschools (10%), Teachers Paying Out of Pocket (10%), Ascanius Members (10%)
Deadlines and Timeline (2015-2016)
  • Nov. 16 Registration opens online.
  • Dec. 18 Register your school and each of your students by name. Pay the registration fee (online or by mail).
  • Jan. 8 Entries must be submitted online by this date. You will receive further instructions upon registration.
  • April 22 Awards, results, and CD's should be in the mail to you and your students. 
How do I integrate SCRIBO into my classroom?

SCRIBO is designed to be as flexible as possible so that it will easily integrate into your class. You could offer a contest, assignment, or project from which you choose and submit the best entries. This could be open-ended, connected to a cultural unit, or connected to your text's storyline. Click here to see other teachers' methods for implementing SCRIBO, or to share your own!

What do we get? 
  • Certificates for all participants
  • The top 20% of scorers on each level receive a medal with ribbon
  • Press release and letter to the principal recognizing all medal winners from your school
  • Participating teachers and the very best scorers will receive a free CD or PDF of the top entries, including multiple entries from each level
  • Knowledge that your school is supporting the mission of Ascanius: The Youth Classics Institute to bring Latin and Classical Studies to our youngest scholars
Scoring 

All entries will be judged by Latin teachers and professors who have training in Latin composition and/or oral Latin, using the following categories: grammatical and syntactical accuracy, choice of vocabulary, quality of work, audience appeal. Entries in the running to be in the top 20% will be scored by at least one additional judge. (Please contact SCRIBO if you would like to apply to serve as a judge.)

Further Information

If you have any questions or concerns, please email scribo@ascaniusyci.org.

professional_newsOther Professional News

Have you read the new Standards?

Twenty years after the ACL and APA published Standards for Classical Language Learning, they're being updated. The project was led by the American Classical League (ACL) and the Society for Classical Studies (SCS), with representatives from the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA), the Classical Association of the Atlantic States (CAAS), the Classical Association of the Middle West and South (CAMWS), the Classical Association of New England (CANE), and the Classical Association of the Pacific Northwest (CAPN).

This is an important document because it will influence teacher-training programs and state and district standards in coming decades. Please download the draft document here ( https://aclclassics.org/pages/standards). This is your chance to share your thoughts, so tell the committee what you think: In what ways does the draft reflect your outlook on teaching? Are there changes you'd suggest?

Here are the addresses you'll need:

Mary English, SCS V-P for Education, englishm@mail.montclair.edu
Kathy Elifrits, ACL President president@aclclassics.org
Sherwin Little, ACL Administrative Secretary, Project Manager
info@aclclassics.org
SCS Announces Changes in Bylaws and Regulations

This June, the Society for Classical Studies announced significant changes in its bylaws and regulations as part of the process of implementing its strategic plan. You can read the full text of Robert Bagnall's announcement here.

kitchnerKitchner Sneak Peek
Panels and Workshops Approved for the 2017 Annual Meeting

Advances in Teaching Beginning Greek
Wilfred E. Major, Louisiana State University, organizer and presider
The 2016 College Greek Exam. Albert Watanabe, Louisiana State University
  1. "The 2016 College Greek Exam." Albert Watanabe, Louisana State University.
  2. "Teaching Ablaut in Elementary Ancient Greek." Rex Wallace, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  3. "Sailing through Practice in Elementary Greek: How to Use Psuedo-Skylax's Periplous." Wilfred E. Major, Louisiana State University
  4. "The Politics of Greek Online Courses." Anthony Hollingsworth, Roger Williams University
Altay Coskun, University of Waterloo, organizer and presider
  1. "Prosodion Written in Bone: An Inscribed Bone Plaque from the Berezan Island." Anna K. Boshnakova, Sheridan College
  2. "Peripheral Aftermath of the Treaty of Apameia in the Black Sea." Germain Payen, Independent Scholar
  3. "The Bosporan Kings: Friends or Enemies of the Romans?" Altay Coskun, University of Waterloo
  4. "New Observations on the Dura-Periplus Map." Konstantin Boshnakov, Conestoga College
  5. "Assessing Regional Wealth in Late Roman Pontos." Hugh Elton, Trent University
Tarah Csaszar, Independent Scholar, and  Crystal Rosenthal, Independent Scholar, organizers
Crystal Rosenthal, Independent Scholar, presider
Justin Arft, University of Tennessee at Knoxville, and Theodora Kopestonsky, University of Tennessee at Knoxville , organizers
Justin Arft, University of Tennessee, presider 
  1. "Wild Nothing: Teaching Latin Intertextuality." Christopher Trinacty, Oberlin College
  2. "Medea Sings: Pop Music as Interpretation." Christopher Bungard, Butler University
  3. "Before Queen: Vergil and the Musical Tradition of Sampling Popular Song." Naomi Kaloudis, Valparaiso University
  4. "What can Taylor Swift, Miley Cyrus, and Adele do for your Latin Prose Composition students?" Stephen Kershner, Austin Peay State University
  5. "Never Out of Style: Teaching Latin Love Poetry with Taylor Swift." Theodora Kopestonsky, University of Tennessee at Knoxville
Janet Downie, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, organizer
Lawrence Kim, Trinity University, organizer and presider 
  1. "Classical Sophists in the Second Sophistic." Kendra Eshleman, Boston College
  2. "Lovers of Homer in Dio of Prusa's On Kingship (Or. 2) and Borystheniticus (Or. 36)." Lawrence Kim, Trinity University
  3. "The Romance Between Greece and Rome in Aelius Aristides' Orations on Smyrna (Orr. 17-21) and Corinth (Or. 46 )." Janet Downie, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  4. "Experiencing the Divine in Apuleius' 'Cupid and Psyche.'" Aldo Tagliabue, University of Heidelberg, Germany
  5. Response. Lauren Caldwell, Wesleyan University
Elizabeth Carney, Clemson University, organizer
Anna Raia, College of New Rochelle, and Maria Marsilio, St. Joseph University, presiders
John Gruber-Miller, Cornell College, organizer and presider
Waterloo Institute for Hellenistic Studies Panel
Riemer Faber, University of Waterloo, organizer and presider 
  1. "Verbal-Visual Kinship in the Shield of Herakles." Timothy Heckenlively, Baylor University
  2. "Aetiology and Descriptions of Works of Art in Callimachus." Flora Manakidou, Democritus University of Thrace
  3. "Feasting by Homeric Torchlight: Ekphrasis and Cultural Transmission at De Rerum Natura 2.24-26." Basil Dufallo, University of Michigan
  4. "Ekphrasis, Experience, and Experiment." Courtney Roby, Cornell University
GSIC Panel

Elizabeth Deacon, University of Colorado

  1. "'Visiting' Along to Tenure-Track." Osman Umurhan, University of New Mexico
  2. "Finding a Primary and Secondary Teaching Position in Latin." Jennifer Kindick, Cherry Creek High School and Ricks Center for Gifted Children
  3. "Parallel Lives: Alternative Careers in Classics, Humanities, and Academia." Wesley Wood, University of Colorado at Boulder
Presidential Panel
Julia D. Hejduk, Baylor University, organizer and presider
  1. "'Hail Wedded Love!': Embracing the Conjugal in Ovid." Philip Hardie, Cambridge University
  2. "Festive Allusions: Ovid on the Ides of March." Carole E. Newlands, University of Colorado
  3. "Vergil and Ovid: Poets of Their Times, and of Ours." Joseph Farrell, University of Pennsylvania
  4. Response. James J. O'Hara, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Kathryn A. Simonsen, Memorial University of Newfoundland, organizer and presider 
Waterloo Institute for Hellenistic Studies Panel
Sheila Ager, University of Waterloo, organizer and presider 
  1. "Kings Don't Lie: Truthtelling and Ptolemy I." Timothy Howe, St. Olaf College.
  2. "Ptolemy I Soter: A Man of His Own Creation." Waldemar Heckel, University of Calgary
  3. "Ptolemy the Reckless: the Son of Lagos' Actions in the Early Years Following Alexander the Great's Death." Edward Anson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock.
  4. "Numismatic Evidence for the Character of Ptolemy I." Catharine Lorber. Independent Scholar
  5. "Building a Dynasty: the Families of Ptolemy I Soter." Sheila Ager, University of Waterloo.
Clifford A. Robinson, University of the Sciences, organizer
Michael Goyette, Brooklyn College, presider 
  1. "Effects of Place in Senecan Tragedy." Lisl Walsh, Beloit College
  2. "Writing to Realization: Seneca's 30th Epistle." Scott Lepisto, University of Southern California
  3. "Visualization, Emotions, and Understanding in Senecan Exempla." Laury Ward, Hillsdale College 
  4. "The Materiality of the Voice in Stoic Thought and Seneca's Personae of Claudius." Clifford A. Robinson, University of the Sciences
  5. Response. Michael Goyette, Brooklyn College
Monica S. Cyrino, University of New Mexico, organizer and presider 
  1. "Greeking Women's Fashion from 1795 to 1863." Rebecca Futo Kennedy, Denison University
  2. "Cleopatra, Egypt, and Early Twentieth-Century Female Dress." Kelly Olson, University of Western Ontario
  3. "Illusion and Reality: Historical Costume and Everyday Fashion." Margaret Toscano, University of Utah
  4. "Designing Lizpatra (1963): The Vision and Influence of Irene Sharaff." Monica S. Cyrino, University of New Mexico
  5. "The Shadow of Cleopatra's Eyes." Anise K. Strong, Western Michigan University
CPL Panel

Jennifer S. Moss, Wayne State University, organizer and presider

  1. "Testing as a Part of Genuine Assessment in a High School Language Class." Keely Lake, Wayland Academy
  2. "Testing in a College Language Classroom." Jennifer Sheridan Moss, Wayne State University
  3. "Assessment from an Instructional Design and Learning Science Perspective." Jaclyn Dudek, Pennsylvania State University
Andrew T. Faulkner, University of Waterloo, organizer and presider
NCLG Panel
Mary Pendergraft, Wake Forest University, organizer and presider
  1. "Current Status of the Seal of Biliteracy." Mary Pendergraft, Wake Forest University
  2. "History of the Seal of Biliteracy and National Guidelines." Edward Zarrow, Westwood High School
  3. "The Seal of Biliteracy and Classroom Implications." Christopher Mural, Adlai E. Stevenson High School
GSIC Workshop
Wesley J. Wood, University of Colorado, organizer and presider
Samuel Hahn, University of Colorado Boulder, presenter

CPL Workshop
Keely Lake, Wayland Academy, organizer and presider
Amy Leonard, Grady High School, presenter

officers_committeesCAMWS Officers and Committees 2016-17
Officers and Executive Committee Members
  • Alden Smith, Baylor University (TX), President (2017)
  • Laura McClure, University of Wisconsin, President Elect (2017)
  • Antonios C. Augoustakis, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Immediate Past President (2017)
  • Thomas J. Sienkewicz, Monmouth College (IL), Secretary-Treasurer (2017)
  • Antonios C. Augoustakis, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Editor, Classical Journal (2021)
  • John C. Gruber-Miller, Cornell College (IA), Editor Teaching Classical Languages (2019)
  • Timothy S. Heckenlively, Baylor University (TX), Editor, CAMWS Newsletter (2018)
  • Keely Lake, Wayland Academy (WI), Chair, CPL (2019) 
  • Andromache Karanika, University of California, Irvine, Chair, Finance Committee (2017)
  • Roger T. Macfarlane, Brigham Young University (UT), Chair, Membership Committee (2018)
  • Nicoletta Villa-Sella, The Linsly School (WV), Chair, Steering Committee (2018)
  • James J. O'Hara, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Member-at-Large (2017)
  • Hunter H. Gardner, University of South Carolina, Member-at-Large (2018)
  • David Schenker, University of Missouri, Member-at-Large (2019)
Program Committee
  • Alden Smith, Baylor University, President (Chair, ex officio)
  • Antonios C. Augoustakis, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Past President (ex officio)
  • Laura McClure, University of Wisconsin, President Elect, (ex officio)
  • Marilyn B. Skinner, University of Arizona (2017)
  • Christopher Nappa, University of Minnesota (2018)
  • Zoe Stamatopoulou, Washington University (MO) (2019)
  • Ellen Greene, University of Oklahoma (2019)
  • Zina Giannopoulou, University of California, Irvine (2019)
  • Alison R. Futrell, University of Arizona (2019)
  • Rebecca Futo Kennedy, Denison University (OH) (2019)
Committee for the Promotion of Latin  
  • Keely Lake, Wayland Academy, Chair (2019)
  • David B. Wharton, University of North Carolina, Greensboro (2017)
  • Osman S. Umurhan, University of New Mexico (2018)
  • Rev. B. A. Gregg, Cleveland School of Science and Technology (OH)  (2018)
  • Marcie Handler, Covington Latin School (KY) (2018)
  • Tyler Lansford, University of Colorado (2019)
  • Steven L. Jones, Houston Baptist University (TX) (2019)
Development Committee  
  • John F. Miller,  University of Virginia, Chair (2018)
  • John C. Gruber-Miller, Cornell College (IA) (2018)
  • Peter E. Knox, Case Western Reserve University (OH) (2018)
  • Charles F. Pazdernik, Grand Valley State University (MI) (2018)
  • Marilyn Skinner, University of Arizona (2019)
  • Angeline Chiu, University of Vermont (2019)
  • Alden Smith, Baylor University (TX), President, ex officio 
  • Thomas J. Sienkewicz, Monmouth College (IL), Secretary-Treasurer, ex officio
Finance Committee
  • Andromache Karanika, University of California, Irvine, Chair (2017)
  • Jenny Strauss Clay, University of Virginia (2018)
  • Mathias Hanses, Penn State University (2018)
  • Lisl Walsh, Beloit College (WI) (2018)
  • Angeliki Tzanetou, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign  (2019)
  • Mark Padilla, Christopher Newport University (VA) (2019)
  • David J. Schenker, University of Missouri (2019)
  • Alden Smith, Baylor University (TX), President, ex officio
  • Thomas J. Sienkewicz, Monmouth College (IL), Secretary-Treasurer, ex officio
Membership Committee 
  • Roger T. Macfarlane, Brigham Young University (UT), Chair (2018)
  • Lauren S. Rogers, Salem Academy (NC) (2017)
  • Vassiliki Panaoussi, College of William and Mary (VA)  (2018)
  • Lorenzo F. Garcia, Jr., Universiity of New Mexico (2018)
  • Stephanie A. McCarter, Sewanee: The University of the South (TN)  (2018)
  • Douglas C. Clapp, Samford University (AL) (2019)
  • Appointment Pending
  • Alden Smith, Baylor University (TX), President, ex officio
  • Thomas J. Sienkewicz,  Monmouth College (IL), Secretary-Treasurer, ex officio
Merit Committee 
  • James M. May, St. Olaf College (MN), Chair, Orator (2018)
  • James V. Lowe, John Burroughs School (MO) (2017)
  • Susan C. Shelmerdine, University of North Carolina at Greensboro  (2017)
  • Georgia L. Irby, College of Willian and Mary (VA) (2018)
  • Daniel B. Levine, University of Arkansas (2018)
  • Julia D. Hejduk, Baylor University (TX) (2019)
  • Gregory N. Daugherty, Randolph Macon College (VA) (2019)
Nominating Committee
  • Antonios C. Augoustakis, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Immediate Past President, Chair, ex officio
  • James A. Andrews, Ohio University (2017)
  • Carole E. Newlands, University of Colorado Boulder (2018)
  • Monica S. Cyrino, University of New Mexico (2018)
  • Anatole Mori, University of Missouri (2018)
  • Eleni Manolaraki, University of South Florida (2019)
  • Christine G. Perkell, Emory University (2019)
  • Thomas J. Sienkewicz, Monmouth College (IL), Secretary-Treasurer, ex officio
Subcommittee on Publications 
Note: all members of this subcommittee serve ex officio .
  • Alden Smith, Baylor University (TX), President
  • Antonios C. Augoustakis, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Immediate Past President
  • Antonios C. Augoustakis, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Editor, The Classical Journal, 
  • Joel P. Christensen, University of Texas, San Antonio, Editor, Classical Journal Online
  • John C. Gruber-Miller, Cornell College (IA), Editor, Teaching Classical Languages
  • Timothy S. Heckenlively, Baylor University (TX), Editor, CAMWS Newsletter
  • Bartolo A. Natoli, Randolph-Macon College (VA), Editor, CJ Forum
  • Thomas J. Sienkewicz, Monmouth College (IL), Secretary-Treasurer
Resolutions Committee
  • Geoffrey W. Bakewell, Rhodes College (TN), Chair (2017)
  • Kristopher F. B. Fletcher, Louisiana State University (2017)
  • Kristin O. Lord, Wilfred Laurier University (ON) (2018)
  • Anne H. Groton, St. Olaf College (MN) (2018)
  • Robert T. White, Shaker Heights High School (OH) (2018)
Steering Committee on Awards and Scholarships
Note: all 8 subcommittee chairs serve ex officio .
  • Nicoletta Villa-Sella, The Linsly School (WV), Chair (2018)
  • Andrew Faulkner, University of Waterloo (ON), First Book Award
  • Jason S. Nethercut, University of South Florida, School Awards and
    Ryan G.Sellers, Memphis University School (TN), School Awards
  • Ariana E. Traill, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Semple, Grant, Benario Awards
  • Sophie Mills, University of North Carolina at Ashville, Stewart Undergraduate Awards
  • Lorenzo F. Garcia, Jr., University of New Mexico, Stewart Training/Travel Awards
  • Mary L. Pendergraft, Wake Forest University (NC), Kraft/CAMWS Teaching Awards
  • Sandra L. Blakely, Emory University (GA), Excavation/Field School Awards
  • Helena R. Dettmer, University of Iowa, Ladislaus J. Bolchazy Award
  • Thomas J. Sienkewicz, Monmouth College (IL), Secretary, Treasurer, ex officio
History Committee
  • Ward W. Briggs, CAMWS Historian, University of South Carolina, Chair, ex officio (2018)
  • Ippokratis Kantzios, University of South Florida (2017)
  • Anne Groton, St. Olaf College (2019)
  • Justin M. Schwamm, Massey Hill Classical High School (NC) (2019)
  • Thomas J. Sienkewicz, Monmouth College (IL), ex officio
Other Offices

Historian
Photographer
CAMWS Representative to Federation of the Societies of Classical Studies (FIEC)
CAMWS Webmaster
CAMWS Social Media Director
 

Subcommittees for Awards and Scholarships

Subcommittee on the Semple, Grant and Benario Travel Awards
  • Ariana E. Traill, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Chair (2018)
  • Diane J. Rayor, Grand Valley State University (MI) (2017)
  • Ian N. Hochberg, St. Stephen's & St. Agnes School (VA)  (2017)
  • Michele V. Ronnick, Wayne State University (MI) (2018)
  • Andrew S. Becker, Virginia Tech (2018)
  • Andrew Alwine, College of Charleston (2019)
Subcommittee on the First Book Award
  • Andrew T. Faulkner, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Chair (2018)
  • Joseph L. Rife, Vanderbilt University (2017)
  • Jane W. Crawford, University of Virginia (2017)
  • Neil W. Bernstein, Ohio University (2018)
  • Jennifer L. Larson, Kent State University (2019)
  • Kyle Harper, University of Oklahoma (2019)
Subcommittee on the School Awards
  • Jason S. Nethercut, University of South Florida, Co-Chair (2018)
  • Ryan G. Sellers, Memphis University School (TN), Co-Chair (2018)
  • Krishni S. Burns, University of Akron (OH) (2017)
  • Amy K. Leonard, Grady High School (GA) (2017)
  • Salvador Bartera, Mississippi State University (2017)
  • Margaret W. Musgrove, University of Central Oklahoma (2018)
  • Debbie Felton, University of Massachusetts Amherst (2018)
  • Sarah Ellery. Montgomery Bell Academy (TN) (2018)
  • Chris Ann Matteo,  Washington Latin Charter Public School (DC)  (2018)
  • William S. Duffy, University of Texas at San Antonio (2019)
Subcommittee on the Stewart Undergraduate Awards
  • Sophie Mills, University of North Carolina, Asheville, Chair (2019)
  • Eddie R. Lowry, Jr., Ripon College (WI) (2017)
  • Peter J. Anderson, Grand Valley State University (MI) (2018)
  • Thomas Biggs, University of Georgia (2018)
  • Joel Christensen, Brandeis University (2019)
  • Connie Rodriquez, Loyola University of New Orleans (2019)
  • Timothy Heckenlively, Baylor University (TX) (2019)
Subcommittee on the Stewart Training and Travel Awards
  • Lorenzo F. Garcia, Jr., University of New Mexico, Chair
  • Robin C. Anderson, Phoenix Country Day School (AZ) (2017)
  • Elizabeth J. Rief, Summit School (NC) (2017)
  • Lindsay Herndon, Spotsylvania Middle School (VA) (2018)
  • Simon P. Burris, Baylor University (TX) (2019)
  • Julie Langford, University of South Florida (2019)
Subcommittee on the Teaching Awards (Kraft and CAMWS)
  • Mary L. Pendergraft, Wake Forest University (NC), Chair (2018)
  • Louise H. Pratt, Emory University (GA) (2017)
  • Michele P. Bertaud, Carmel Catholic Latin High School (IL)  (2017)
  • Bartolo A. Natoli, Randolph-Macon College (VA) (2017)
  • Kirk Sanders, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign  (2018)
  • Robert J. Sklenář, University of Tennessee (2018)
  • Howard W. Chang, Flint Hill School (VA) (2019)
  • Jonathan Zarecki, University of North Carolina at Greensboro (2019)
Subcommittee on the Excavation and Field School Award
  • Sandra L. Blakely, Emory University (GA), Chair (2019)
  • Douglas Clapp, Samford University (AL) (2018)
  • Andrew Carroll, Regis Jesuit High School (CO) (2018)
  • Amy Sowder-Koch, Towson University (MD) (2019)
  • Víctor M. Martínez, Arkansas State University (2019)
  • Davide M. Zori, Baylor University (TX) (2019)
Subcommittee on the Ladislaus J. Bolchazy Pedagogy Book Award
  • Helena R. Dettmer, University of Iowa, Chair (2019)
  • Generosa Sangco-Jackson, Oak Hall School (FL) (2018)
  • Beth Severy-Hoven, Macalester Colllege (MN) (2018)
  • Barbara Weiden Boyd, Bowdoin College (ME) (2019)
  • David Pollio, Christopher Newport University (VA) (2019)
  • Cynthia White, University of Arizona (2019)

 



CAMWS State, Provincial, and Regional Vice-Presidents

Canada Region
  • Regional VP: Andrew T. Faulkner, University Of Waterloo, ON (2019)
  • Manitoba: C. Michael Sampson, University of Manitoba (2017)
  • Ontario: Fanny L. Dolansky, Brock University (2018)
  • Saskatchewan: John R. Porter, University of Saskatchewan (2018)
Gulf Region
  • Regional VP: T. Davina McClain, Louisiana Scholars' College (2019)
  • Alabama: P. Andrew Montgomery, Samford University (2017)
  • Louisiana: Wilfred E. Major, Louisiana State University (2018)
  • Mississippi: Jonathan B. Fenno, University of Mississippi (2018)
  • Texas: Deborah Beck, University of Texas at Austin (2018)
Lake Michigan Region
  • Regional VP: Daniel W. Leon, University Of Illinois At Urbana-Champaign (2018)
  • Illinois: Yasuko Taoka, Southern Illinois University (2019)
  • Indiana: Antonia J. Syson, Purdue University (2018)
  • Michigan: Anise K. Strong, Western Michigan University (2019)
Northern Plains Region
  • Regional VP: Lorina N. Quartarone, University Of St. Thomas, MN (2017) 
  • Minnesota: Clara S. Hardy, Carleton College (MN) (2017)
  • North Dakota: Rocki Wentzel, Augustana College (SD) (2018)
  • South Dakota: Rocki Wentzel, Augustana College (SD) (2017)
  • Wisconsin: Keely K. Lake, Wayland Academy (2018)
Ohio Valley Region
  • Regional VP: Gwen L. Compton-Engle, John Carroll University, OH (2018)
  • Ohio: Garrett A. Jacobsen, Denison University (2018)
  • West Virginia:  E. Del Chrol, Marshall University (WV) (2019)
Plains Region
  • Regional VP: Marcia H. Lindgren, University Of Iowa (2019)
  • Iowa: Monessa Cummins, Grinnell College (2018)
  • Kansas: Cheryl L. Golden, Newman University (2017)
  • Missouri: Amy L. Norgard, Truman State University (2018)
  • Nebraska: Mark A. Haynes, Creighton Preparatory High School (NE) (2019)
  • Oklahoma: John H. Hansen, University of Oklahoma (2019)
Rocky Mountain Region
  • Regional VP: Osman S. Umurhan, University Of New Mexico (2018)
  • Arizona: Jared Copeland, Scottsdale Preparatory Academy (AZ) (2017)
  • Colorado: Tyler Lansford, University of Colorado, Boulder (2018)
  • Nevada: Seth A. Jeppesen, Brigham Young University (2019)
  • New Mexico: Luke Gorton, University of New Mexico (2018)
  • Utah: Seth A. Jeppesen, Brigham Young University (2019)
  • Wyoming: Laura A. De Lozier, University of Wyoming (2018)
Southeast Region
  • Regional VP: Hunter H. Gardner, University Of South Carolina (2016)
  • Florida: James P. Sickinger, Florida State University (2019)
  • Georgia: Amy K. Leonard, Grady High School (2019)
  • South Carolina: Andrew Alwine, College of Charleston (2019)
Tidewater Region
  • Regional VP: Keyne A. Cheshire, Davidson College (2017)
  • North Carolina: T. H. M. Gellar-Goad, Wake Forest University (2016)
  • Virginia: Trudy Harrington Becker, Virginia Tech (2017)
Upper South Region
  • Regional VP: Ryan Sellers, Memphis University School, TN (2019)
  • Arkansas: Maureen R. Stover, Mt. St. Mary's Academy (2018)
  • Kentucky: Marcie D. Handler, Covington Latin School (2018)
  • Tennessee: Edward G. Long, Clarksville High School (2017)
At-Large Region
  • At-Large Region Regional VP: Stacie Raucci, Union College, NY (2019)


Southern Section Officers 2014-16

President
  • Julie Langford
    Department of History
    University of South Florida
    4202 E. Fowler Avenue,
    SOC 107 Tampa, FL 33620
    jlangfor@cas.usf.edu
    813-974-6994
Vice President
  • David J. White
    Department of Classics
    Baylor University
    One Bear Place #97352
    Waco, TX 76798
    David_J_White@baylor.edu
    (254) 710-1399
Secretary-Treasurer
  • T. Davina McClain
    Director and Associate Professor
    Louisiana Scholars' College at Northwestern State University
    111 Morrison Hall
    Natchitoches, LA 71497
    mcclaind@nsula.edu or camws-ss@camws.org
    (318) 357-4577
    (318) 357-5908 (fax)
Member at Large
  • Bartolo Natoli
    Department of Classics
    Randolph-Macon College
    204 Fox Hall
    Ashland, VA 23005-5505
    bartolonatoli@rmc.edu
    828-251-6296
contributors2016-17 Financial Contributors
The following reflects donations through October.
            
Awards and Scholarships

Joel P. Christensen
Christina A. Clark
Christopher P. Craig
Monessa F. Cummins
Kristopher F. B. Fletcher
Katherine A. Geffcken
Charles A. George
Rebecca R. Harrison
Liane Houghtalin
Stanley A. Iverson
Sharon L. James
Joy K. King
Eleanor W. Leach
Carole E. Newlands
Diane J. Rayor
L. William Schneider
Thomas J. Sienkewicz

Bolchazy Pedagogy Book Prize

Suzanne L. Brown
Helena R. Dettmer
Charles A. George
Anne H. Groton
Stanley A. Iverson
L. William Schneider

CPL

Wisconsin Latin Teachers Association

Excavation / Fieldschool Prize

Jenny S. Clay
Kristopher F. B. Fletcher
Laura Gawlinski
Charles A. George
Liane Houghtalin
Martha J. Payne
R. G. Peterson
L. William Schneider
General Fund

Emily E. Baragwanath
Herbert W. and Janice M. Benario
Christopher M. Brunelle
Ann Raia Colaneri
James H. Dee
Kristopher F. B. Fletcher
Charles A. George
Nicolas P. Gross
Rebecca R. Harrison
Liane Houghtalin
George W. Houston
Dennis P. Kehoe
Adam Kozak
Paul J. Lotz
Stephanie A. McCarter and Daniel S. Holmes
Sophie Mills
Stephen A. Nimis
John R. Porter
Kenneth J. Reckford
Christina A. Salowey
L. William Schneider
Marcia M. Stille
Theodore A. Tarkow
Barbara P. Wallach
Lanetta M. Warrenburg

Other

Charles A. George
L. William Schneider

Total Donation Amount: $3771.00

membershipMembership
Individual Membership

Individual membership in CAMWS for the fiscal year July 1 through June 30 may be purchased for $55 ($30 for student, retiree, first-time teacher, or new CAMWS member). Joint spouse/partner membership is available for $80, retired spouse/partner membership for $50. A life membership costs $1000 for an individual and $1400 for joint spouse/partner.

A membership includes a one-year subscription to The Classical Journal as well as on-line access to the Loeb Classical Library. Please indicate on the membership form whether you would prefer to receive CJ electronically (via JSTOR) or in print. For an extra $5 you may receive the journal in both formats. Please note that membership in CAMWS provides electronic subscription only to the current volume of CJ. CAMWS members wishing to have access to back issues of the journal can do so at a special rate through JStor. Please contact Tom Sienkewicz at stcamws@camws.org for additional information.

The CAMWS Newsletter is sent electronically to all members with e-mail addresses. If you would like to receive a print version in addition, you may indicate that on the membership form.

As part of your CAMWS membership, you are automatically subscribed to Classical Journal On-Line from which you will received frequent reviews of new books in the classical field, unless you indicate on the membership form that you opt out of this subscription.

Membership in CAMWS also includes on-line access to the Loeb Classical Library. (Please note that it may take two or more weeks following payment to process this on-line access.)

Please note: Individual memberships or subscriptions to CJ sent to an address outside the United States or Canada are subject to a $20 postage surcharge. Individual subscriptions automatically include membership in CAMWS.

You may use the CAMWS membership form to join ACL or SALVI, subscribe to any of eight other scholarly journals, order a copy of Herbert Benario's CAMWS: A History of the First Eighty Years, purchase various CAMWS merchandise (including 6-inch 'Roman' rulers, a CAMWS YoYo, shot glasses or koozies) and/or make a tax-deductible contribution to CAMWS.

An individual must be a current member of CAMWS in order to 1.) submit panel, workshop or individual paper proposals for the annual meeting, 2.) register for the annual meeting; 3.) apply for any CAMWS awards or scholarships, including CPL awards; or 4.) hold a CAMWS office or serve on a CAMWS committee.

If you are already a CAMWS member and wish to order CAMWS memorabilia or subscribe to other journals, please use this Miscellaneous Order Form.

How to Join or Renew Your Membership

Please use this electronic membership form: www.camws.org/membership/memberinfo. Payment by credit card is possible through the CAMWS web site (A $3 processing fee will be added to each credit-card transaction.) or you can print out this membership form and mail it to CAMWS with a check or money order drawn on a U.S. bank or a bank that uses U.S. routing codes to:

CAMWS
Monmouth College
700 E. Broadway
Monmouth, IL 61462 



Institutional Membership

If your institution or organization becomes a member of CAMWS, it receives the following benefits:
  • One CAMWS award for an outstanding student to be chosen by your institution. The student receives a congratulatory certificate stating that your school has designated the student as a recipient of a CAMWS Award for Outstanding Accomplishment in Classical Studies for the current academic year, plus a free membership in CAMWS for the following academic year. As CAMWS members, these students would have full access to the on-line Loeb Classical Library. To designate your student honoree(s), please complete the on-line award designation form and submit it no later than May 1st for each academic year. For a list of previous recipients, see CAMWS Award For Outstanding Accomplishment in Classical Studies.
  • The option to choose up to two additional student award recipients ($30 each). Payment required by May 1st of each academic year.
  • A certificate stating your institution's support of CAMWS
  • Eligibility for your students to compete in the CAMWS Sight Translation Contests (required for colleges and universities)
  • Publication of institutional announcements free of charge in the CAMWS Newsletter and on the CAMWS website.
  • 20% discount on ads in the annual meeting program and in The Classical Journal.
  • For K-12 Institutional Members, one complimentary registration at the CAMWS Annual Meeting (not including the banquet)
  • Inclusion on the list of CAMWS Member Institutions, which will be
    • printed in the program of the CAMWS Annual Meeting (if membership is received prior to the printing of the meeting program)
    • printed in the CAMWS Newsletter (if membership is received by May 1st)
    • posted on the CAMWS Website (with hotlinks to the websites of institutional members)

Institutional membership also supports CAMWS awards and scholarships and efforts to promotion Classics in the CAMWS region.

 

Becoming an Institutional Member

 

Any educational institution or organization can become a member of CAMWS by paying an annual fee of either $60 (for a K-12 school or a college or university offering a B.A. in Classics), $75 (for a college or university offering a M.A. only in Classics) or $110 (for a university offering a Ph.D. in Classics). The cost of additional student honorees is $30 per student (maximum two).

To become an institutional member (and/or to order up to two additional student honorees), you can use this on-line form: camws.org/membership/institutionform.php.

Payment can be made by check via groundmail or online by credit card or Paypal account A $3 processing fee will be added to each credit-card transaction.

You many also become an institutional membership of CAMWS by printing this Institutional Membership Form and sending a check or money order to:

 

CAMWS

Monmouth College

700 E. Broadway

Monmouth, IL 61462

classics_newsClassics in the News
In October, The Telegraph covered the emerging archaeological thesis that the famed army of Chinese terracotta warriors may have been influenced by Greek models, perhaps even Greek artisans.

In September, President Obama appointed ACTFL Executive Director (and CAMWS member!) Marty Abbott to the National Security Education Board.

In August, sports journalists around the world became armchair classicists as they watched Michael Phelps rewrite Olympic history. Leonidas of Rhodes' record of 12 victories held for over 2000 years. Phelps stoped just short of doubling that number: 23 gold medals.

In July, The Telegraph (among other outlets) announced the sad decision by the British government to ban Latin abbreviations on all its official websites. 

In June, The Washington Post covered the discovery of a 22 lb chunk of 2000 year old butter, preserved for posterity in an Irish bog.

obitus_recentesObitus Recentes
Abierunt Ad Maiores
Listed here are those individuals whose deaths have come to the attention of CAMWS since the last Business Meeting. A full listing of deceased members may be found on our Necrology of CAMWS Members page. You are invited to leave comments, anecdotes, and other loving remembrances of these CAMWS members on the CAMWS Necrology Blog.

submissionsSubmissions
The CAMWS Newsletter is published three times per year, in the fall, winter, and spring/summer. The deadline for the winter edition is January 15, 2017. Send submissions by email: Timothy_Heckenlively@baylor.edu or newsletter@camws.org. Send submissions by regular mail to:

Dr. Timothy Heckenlively
CAMWS Newsletter Editor
Department of Classics
Baylor University
One Bear Place #97352
Waco, TX 76798

If you have questions, email or call 254-710-1399.

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