Three years ago, a living, learning laboratory that fostered a sense of community through growing sustainable food was merely a dream shared by a number of faculty, staff and students. As Penn State's student-centered sustainable farm celebrates its first year, the leaders of the program are grateful to members of the broader Penn State community who have worked tirelessly to support the mission of the organization. In its first year, over 700 student and 150 community volunteers cultivated 34 varieties of vegetables, herbs, fruits and flowers, resulting in sales of over $22,000. Green Teams are encouraged to volunteer or  take a tour.  


 
   


Starting Friday, Feb. 17 and lasting 46 hours, thousands of students, alumni, and families will flock to the Bryce Jordan Center For The Kids. This year, OPP student director Olivia Rothseid and other organizers are taking the initiative to "capture everything that is recyclable" by increasing the amount of recycling bins and signage, providing waste ambassadors to help with recycling, training and ensuring awareness for the student volunteers, and donating leftover food to prevent waste. Last year THON managed to double its recycling collection and aims to double it again this year. As the zero-waste goal is a work in progress, future efforts will be aimed at purchasing recyclable and compostable alternatives, increasing messaging and communication, and asking donors to support THON's zero-waste mission. Support this incredible student philanthropy by donating or by showing up to support the dancers and the kids they are serving. 



 
Are you hot and bothered over your heating bill this winter? Much of your household energy consumption can be wasted due to inefficiencies such as escaping hot air. There are many ways to reduce this energy waste, ranging from simple changes like insulating and reversing your ceiling fan to installing an new heating system such as a pellet stove or heat pump. Learn about all these options and more using at  energy.gov.
   


Kevin Churik, information technology generalist at Penn State New Kensington, used his expertise to add to the already impressive contributions his campus is making towards sustainability. Kevin identified that classroom projectors were being left on after being used, so he implemented a policy to automatically shut them down after 10 minutes, decreasing the amount of electricity that each projector uses by 50 percent. He also began to transition the school away from bulb-based projectors, which require time and money to change, to maintenance-free laser projectors. These changes not only saved electricity, but also extended the life of  each projector bulb and reduced associated labor costs  of changing the bulbs. 

 
Upcoming Events
 
FEB
18

100 Thomas Building, University Park
11 a.m-12 p.m
 

FEB
20

112 Walker Building, University Park
4 p.m-5 p.m
 

Feb
25

100 Thomas Building, University Park
11 a.m-12 p.m
 

FEB
27

112 Walker Building, University Park
4 p.m-5 p.m
 

 
Check out our calendar for more sustainability-related events.
Lydia Vandenbergh | Penn State's Sustainability Institute
108 Land and Water Building, University Park, PA 16802
 (814) 863-4893 | lydia@psu.edu 
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