Plan Your Ideal Year of Scouting - NEW 
18 Month Tuscarora Planning Calendar!

Our NEW 18 Month Council Planning Calendar..... 
 
was officially released and distributed at District Roundtables last night! 
 

Hot off the press and just in time for your unit's annual planning conference.
 
In case you weren't able to pick up a copy, you may now find it available for download online here.

So go ahead and start planning for another great year of Scouting fun and Pencil Us In!
 
Please Note: The calendar at the link listed above is in PDF format. We are currently in the process of plugging all of those fun and exciting events and dates in to our Google calendar as well. Be sure to subscribe here so you can have all pertinent Scouting dates just a click away on your smart phone or other electronic device. Thanks!





BSA Medical Forms - The Right Forms, The Right Way = No Camp Check-in Delay

BSA Medical Forms, Camp Physicals, Annual Health and Medical Record, Form # 680-001....
 
Whatever you call them, it's that time again! The arrival of summer and the ending of the school year brings resident camp, summer camp, and countless extended-stay camping opportunities and events for units to take advantage of. 
 
Since any camping activity with a duration longer than 72 hours requires a complete, sections A - C, BSA health and medical record form that is also current (not expired), many parents and adult Scouters find themselves scrambling to make an appointment for a physical so they can have the appropriate health forms to submit and keep on file for summer camp and extending camping trips.
 
You probably already know that these forms are required at check-in at the beginning of summer camp. However, you may not be aware that there is only one universal form that is accepted by the BSA and any of its Council-owned camps, AND that there is a right way, and about 50 wrong ways to fill it out.
 
Save precious time during the check-in process, prolonged discomfort for a camper, and maybe even an unnecessary trip out to camp and back for a parent's signature by reviewing the simple Do's and Don'ts below:
 
THE RIGHT FORM:
 
Do: Only the most current version of the BSA Annual Health and Medical Record (2014 printing) will be accepted. (See photo above.) The most current version of the BSA 680-001 Health and Medical Record form can be found here.
Don't: DOT, sports, school or third party forms or physicals WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED They do not ask the same questions and are not recognized by the BSA.
 
THE RIGHT WAY:
 
Do:  Part A - Informed Consent Release Agreement: Please read, know and understand that Informed Consent is:
  • Your understanding that Scouting activities include physical, emotional and mental challenges and participation is voluntary.
  • Medical care proxy is given to the adult in charge and you authorize medical care for yourself or child including transport, hospitalization and surgery if necessary and/or if you are unable to be reached.
THE RIGHT WAY:
 
Do:  Part A - Informed Consent Release Agreement: Please read, know and understand that Informed Consent is:
  • Your understanding that Scouting activities include physical, emotional and mental challenges and participation is voluntary.
  • Medical care proxy is given to the adult in charge and you authorize medical care for yourself or child including transport, hospitalization and surgery if necessary and/or if you are unable to be reached.
THE RIGHT WAY:
 
Do:  Part A - Informed Consent Release Agreement: Please read, know and understand that Informed Consent is:
  • Your understanding that Scouting activities include physical, emotional and mental challenges and participation is voluntary.
  • Medical care proxy is given to the adult in charge and you authorize medical care for yourself or child including transport, hospitalization and surgery if necessary and/or if you are unable to be reached.
  • Talent Release agreement (Most people aren't even aware it's there!) lets BSA use photos and videos of Scouts to be saved and/or used for official purposes like promo videos. Restrictions must be listed if the Scout has any. (Ex. Parent does not wish the Scout to be photographed and used in promo films). If None please select "none".
Do: Part A - Signatures:
  • Grants medical staff permission to treat you/your child appropriately including transferring to further care.
  • If under 18 parent or guardian MUST sign to grant medical staff permission to treat and agree to the above mentioned talent release and activity waiver.
Do:  Part B - Allergies and Medications:

 
  • Single most confusing box on the form! States you can be given other medication that you don't normally take (Ex. Scout is bitten by Fire Ants and needs Benadryl cream to calm reaction and pain.) Lets adults and Medical staff administer non-emergent medication including all topical and oral substances. 
If checked "yes", then Parent/ Guardian signature must be present or is invalid. If checked "no", then we are unable to administer any over-the-counter medications and will have to call you in the case of an injury or illness.
  • By writing none in the exceptions space it acknowledges there are no exceptions and all medications are authorized that medical staff/adult leader feels necessary permission to treat and agree to the above-mentioned talent release and activity waiver.
Do:  Part C - Pre-participation Physical:
  • Obtain certification from NP, PA or MD that your child is healthy enough to be at camp.
  • Required for ANY Scouting activity longer than, or equal to 72 Hours. Can be acquired at most urgent cares, pharmacy clinics and your doctor's office.
Do: Pre Camp Prep Ideas:
Before you leave your meeting place for camp, talk to an adult leader and ask them to review your forms to prevent problems at check in (Ex. A parent forgot to sign on one page)
  • Turn in Medical forms to leaders early for review before the day of camp to avoid any delays or issues during medical screening at check-in at camp.
* The medical forms tips and information above was taken as direct excerpts from a "BSA Medical Forms" presentation given by our summer camp medic Joshua Guthrie, EMT-B. 

We would like to extend a very big THANK YOU to Joshua for putting this information together in a format that we can share with unit leaders and parents in an effort to make the BSA medical forms process easier to understand, and to cut down on the amount of avoidable errors we experience during the check-in process at summer camp. Thank you!
FREE Cub Leader & FREE Scoutmaster Specific Training - at Summer Camp!
.
FREE Cub Leader 
Specific Training  
.
Who:  Registered Adults who are, or plan to be Cub Scout Den Leaders, Cubmasters, or Pack Committee Members.
 
When:  1 evening, Monday, June 18, 2018                             7:00pm - 9:30pm
 .
 OR

             1 evening, Thursday, June 21, 2018 - 
                         7:00pm - 9:30pm
Where:   Camp Tuscarora, 965 Scout Road, Four Oaks, NC  (During Cub Resident Camp!) 
 
Pick from one of the following class options and sign up for the training of your choice by submitting registration to the Council Office: Den Leader Specific, Webelos Leader Specific, Cubmaster Specific, or COR/Pack Committee Specific.
 
* Participants should bring paper/pencil for note-taking. It is also strongly suggested that participants purchase or borrow a copy of the Position Specific Handbook for the training class they're taking and bring it with you to class. *
 
YPT 2 (Youth Protection Training)  is available online at my.scouting.org, and mandatory prior to working with or supervising any youth in the Scouting program. YPT 2 is the very first training course you should complete as an adult volunteer! All participants taking Cub Leader Specific training MUST have current YPT training. 

Effective April 30, new direct contact leaders must also complete Hazardous Weather Training to be considered position trained. This training is also available online at my.scouting.org.
 
Find the flyer and registration form for Cub Leader Specific training here.
 
REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS FRIDAY, JUNE 15, 2018 by 5:00p.
______________________________________________________________

FREE Scoutmaster 
            Specific Training  

 
 
Who:   Registered Adults who are, or plan to be Scoutmasters or Assistant Scoutmasters.
 
When:  
2 evenings, Wednesday and Thursday, June 27 & 28, 2018 - 
6:30pm - 8:30pm
 OR

2 evenings, Wednesday and Thursday, July 4 & 5, 2018 - 
6:30pm - 8:30pm
OR  

2 evenings, Wednesday and Thursday, July 11 & 12, 2018 - 
6:30pm - 8:30pm
 
Pick from one of the options listed above to sign up for your preferred training week, and please note: You MUST attend  both training sessions to receive credit for training.
 
Where:  Camp Tuscarora, 965 Scout Road, Four Oaks, NC  (During Summer Camp!) 
 
* Participants should bring paper/pencil for note-taking. It is also strongly suggested that participants purchase or borrow a copy of the Scoutmaster's Handbook and bring it with you to class. *
 
YPT 2 ( Youth Protection Training)  is also available online at my.scouting.org, and mandatory prior to working with or supervising any youth in the Scouting program. YPT 2 is the very first training course you should complete as an adult volunteer! All participants taking Scoutmaster Specific training must have current YPT training.
 
Effective April 30, new direct contact leaders must also complete Hazardous Weather Training to be considered position trained. This training is also available online at my.scouting.org.

Introduction to Outdoor Leader Skills will be conducted November 17 - 18, 2018..... More information about this will be covered at Leader Specific Training.

Find the flyer and registration form for Scoutmaster Specific training here.
 
REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS THE FRIDAY PRIOR TO EACH COURSE DATE by 5:00p.
 
With questions or for more information, please contact Sarah Fernandez at 919-734-1714, or via email at Sarah.Fernandez@Scouting.org
Day Camp - 
Experts Explain Why It Enhances the Cub Scouting Experience 
Cub Scout Day-Camp - it will probably be chaotic. 
.
It might even be a little stressful. But, will it be worth it? Absolutely!

As a parent, you might be a little nervous about your Cub's first day-camp experience. 

All day-camps vary a little, depending on your council and your camp. However, they all share a common theme: Day-camp programs help make Cub Scouting a more positive experience for youth.

Read three Cub Scouting experts reasons why: 

Day-Camp is A Time to Try New Things

When was the last time your child played a human battleship game on a sand volleyball court? Creative day-camp programs - typically themed with fun topics like superheroes or outer-space - go beyond the activities kids will typically experience in school.

"School programs can have restrictions," says Jennifer Mooney, Cub Scout camping director for the Cascade Pacific Council. "The goal of a great day-camp program focuses on fun more than anything. Those silly games and songs are going to be the things kids keep talking about all summer long. Day camp is the time and place for kids to be kids."

Unstructured Outdoor Play

Don't be confused when you see the word "program" in your day-camp schedule. Yes, there will be structured activities and, often, different stations for Scouts. But sometimes, "you can have 20 awesome activities planned, and all the boys want to do is pick up sticks or rocks. And that's OK," says Amy Hutcherson, den leader and former Cub Scout specialist at the BSA's national service center.

At day camp, kids are unplugged and enjoying the outdoors. They get to explore and use their creativity. "This is when they can experience unstructured play in a safe environment," Hutcherson says.

The Power of Peer Pressure

Is your child reluctant toward certain activities, say, swimming or archery? Being around other peers in a day-camp environment helps encourage youth to try things they might normally shy away from, Hutcherson says. "Lots of kids are shy, especially with new experiences. When they see how much fun other kids are having, I've found that they're more likely to give new things a try."

A Time for Advancement

Despite the focus on unstructured play, day-camp is often a time for Cub Scouts to complete advancement activities that are often hard to accomplish, like shooting sports.

In fact, activities that complete advancement requirements are in high demand among den leaders, Mooney says. "Den leaders want Cub Scouts to have a chance to complete some of the advancement requirements that they can't offer on their own. But kids, on the other hand, just want to have fun. I've found that it's key to put fun first, and
advancement is a bonus."

Advancement helps whet a Scout's appetite for achieving even more in Cub Scouting. "Offering those advancement opportunities and awards can help keep Scouts engaged, so long as they think they're being rewarded for just having fun," Hutcherson says. 

Most day-camp programs encourage parent involvement or, at the least, parent attendance during special activities - such as final programs on the last day. Don't miss out!

"This is a time for Cub Scouts  to really show off what they're doing," says Dennis Kampa, a Rocky Mountain Council volunteer who has taught Day Camp School for more than two decades. Kampa encourages parents to go one step further and volunteer to help out at camp. "There's a reason your kid joined Cub Scouts. Shouldn't you be a part of that delivery system?"

Getting involved might help ease some of your own fears, especially if this is your child's first day of camp. This is also a chance for parents to meet and spend time with their son's leaders. Plus, it is a great chance for parents to connect with each  other outside of their typical den e
nvironment.

An Entryway to Camping

The day-camp program serves as a Cub Scout's first experience with camping. Except at day-camp, you get to go home at night. This gives youth a taste for camping in a low-stress method.
"Day camp is an important retention tool for many reasons, but one is that it helps families decide if resident camping is a good next step as the Scout ages," Mooney explains.
Engaging With Youth Leaders

Most day camps use youth staff to run stations for Cub Scouts. "When we train youth staff right, they are excited for Scouting and getting outside," Mooney says.
This enthusiasm can be contagious to the younger Scouts, which means many Cub Scouts complete day-camp with a renewed excitement for Scouting.

"They want to be like the older Scouts they met at camp. Some of the youth even make it a goal to return to camp to work on staff when they're Boy Scouts," Mooney says.

Connecting to the Community

Service-related projects are popular activities offered at day-camp, like rebuilding a bridge or cleaning up a campsite. Hutcherson finds that Scouts love working together on projects like this. "It gives them a sense of purpose and helps instill some of the important Scouting values early on," she says.

Delivering Promises Made at Recruitment

When your pack recruited new Cub Scouts last fall (or even earlier this spring), leaders promised excitement, fun, outdoors and advancement. Day-camp programs offer all of this in one week.

"Camp helps deliver these promises," says Mooney.

Hutcherson agrees: "If we don't keep the promises we made at recruiting time, it's hard to keep kids involved and coming back for more."

The Bigger Picture

"Sometimes parents and kids don't know that there's more to Scouting than their den or pack," says Mooney. "When they're at day camp, meeting families and kids from other parts of their city, they realize that they're a part of something much bigger. They come to understand that Scouting is much more than just their circle, and they share something in common with a lot of other kids."

Not signed up? See below for more details:
Speaking of Day Camp - Sign Up Today!

 
Tuscarora 
Council |
Summer Day Camps 2018
 
This year's "Wizarding World of Scouting" themed Cub Scout Day Camps will be filled with FUN and exciting outdoor educational opportunities that provide rich environments with positive role models for our Cub Scouts.
The campers will have the chance to get a head start on their next rank advancement as well as have a lot of fun while learning about fun things in the outdoors at our various event locations!
 
Tuscarora Day Camp Dates and Locations Are As Follows:
 
Torhunta District Summer Day Camp! - 
July 19th, 20th & 21st from 8:30-4:30 
at Old Waynesborough Park in Goldsboro, NC
(801 Hwy U.S. 17 Bypass South, Goldsboro, NC 27530)

Cost  - 1) $55/Scout (and sibling) - the camp fee includes lunch ALL 3 DAYS, T-shirt, supplies and patch for each Cub Scout or sibling; 
.
2) 
Adults can order a Cub Scout Day Camp T-shirt for $12.00
.
3) 
Family Day - You can register your entire family for Family Day on Saturday for only $10! This includes lunch and program supplies!
 
Find Event Flyer Here

neusiok District Summer Day Camp!
July 26th, 27th & 28st
Thursday & Friday from 7:30-12:30
Saturday from 7:30 - 4:00
at sam godwin recreation park in pine level, NC
(20 E. Crescent St., Pine LevelNc 27568)


Cost  - 1) $40/Scout (and sibling) - the camp fee includes T-shirt, supplies and patch for each Cub Scout or sibling; 
.
2) Adults can order a Cub Scout Day Camp T-shirt for $12.00. Indicate name and size on the registration form; 
.
3) Family Day - You can register your entire family for Family Day on Saturday for only $10! This includes lunch and program supplies!

Find Event Flyer Here

coharie District Summer Day Camp! - 
august 4th from 7:30-4:30 
location tbd
$20.00 per cub/sibling (includes lunch)
 
Event Flyer Forthcoming
CHECK US OUT AND FOLLOW OUR STORY IN PICTURES ON INSTAGRAM! 
 


Boy Scouts of America
Tuscarora Council
Council Service Center - 172 NC Hwy 581 S.
Goldsboro, NC 27530

P 919.734.1714 F 919.734-6540

Camp Tuscarora - 965 Scout Road
Four Oaks, NC 27524
 _____________________________________________________________________________________________
Want to Join Scouting? www.BEASCOUT.org

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