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Is Your College Freshman Financially Responsible?  
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Is your child already in college or headed to college?   It's a great idea to run through these 10 tips with them.   Maybe they're already on track, or maybe they just need a reminder.
 
Warm regards,
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Catherine Maniscalco Avery
 
The backbone of CAIM is to employ a classic long term investment strategy including dividend paying stocks. CAIM is an independent, women owned investment management firm specializing in managing investment portfolios for women and baby boomers.

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September 20, 2016|  Issue No. 75
In This Issue
Freshman Financially Responsible?
2Q Market Update 2016
Dividend Champs 2016
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Is Your College Freshman Financially Responsible?   Let's Find Out.

 
Going away to college is an exciting time for students. Often it's their first real experience of independence away from their families.   However, with all the new challenges involved, it can also be all too easy for them to overlook some important new financial responsibilities.
In the online article: 10 Common Financial Mistakes College Freshman Make, And How to Avoid Them, ThinkAdvisor.com turns to The American Bankers Association (ABA) Foundation for common missteps freshman should avoid and tips for settling into college life.
  1. Not Creating a Budget - This step is critical to making money last throughout the semester/school year and ensuring there's enough money for the important things.  
  2. Overspending - Creating a budget goes hand in hand with sticking to it. Consistently eating out and shopping will definitely not make money last.
  3. Overextending Credit Card Usage - College students need to understand that while it may be easy to use that card now, the consequences of debt owed down the line can be devastating.
  4. Neglecting to Take Advantage of a Bank's Resources - Banks offer a plethora of online tools that can help students stay on top of their finances, whether that's checking balances, paying bills, depositing checks or monitoring transaction history.
  5. Overlooking "Free" Money - Money is available to students in the form of scholarships, student discounts and other deals if they search for it.
  6. Buying Everything New - "Textbook pricing is morally bankrupt," offers one source in the article. The advice? Consider buying books online and used.   And if they only need it for a couple of chapters, there's always the library.
  7. Not Using Your Bank's ATM - Avoid other bank ATMs as bank fees really add up.   Either take out larger sums to avoid multiple withdrawals or ask for cash back when paying for weekly necessaries.
  8. Not Saving for Emergencies - Situations do arise so whether the car or computer breaks down, or students have to buy an unexpected ticket home, it's important to have cash on hand to do it.
  9. Being Afraid to Ask Questions - Students won't learn anything if they don't ask question and, since being at college is a learning experience, it's important to ask - whether it's parents, or the bank.
  10. Freshman Living Beyond Their Means - Behind all 10 suggestions is the idea of students living within their means. Whether this involves creating a budget and sticking to it, taking advantage of scholarships and discounts, or modifying behavior (limit 'hanging out', take advantage of those free events offered to students at college, use student IDs and meal plans instead of eating out), it all comes down to conserving money.  
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2Q Market Update 2016

Investors most likely entered the 2nd quarter with two questions on their mind: Will the Fed raise rates this quarter and will ... Read more
  
 
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Dividend Champs 2016
 
This year the Dividend Champs we've chosen to highlight are companies that:  1. Boast dividend yields above the current 10 year treasury yield of 1.65%, 2. Have a history of    
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