Honors Network News
Tuesday, March 21

In This Issue:

Events/Announcements:

Apply to be a Programming Committee Co-Chair

Third Installment in our 'Human Animal Film Series' features Blackfish

Gates Cambridge/Churchill Scholarship Info Session

Rhodes, Marshall and Mitchell Scholarship Event

The Border and the Ban: A Panel Discussion

Honors College to Hire Student Diversity Officer

Leadership Toolbox: Narrating Your Honors Experience in Personal Statements

Global Committee Cultural Fair

 

Features:

Making Greater Lafayette Greater: Honors Course Tackles Challenges, Connects Communities

Professor Brings Cricket Spitting to the Honors College

 

Acclaimed International Photographer Speaking TODAY

The Border and the Ban

Beat the Friday Deadline: Apply for HC Leadership Roles Today

 

Opportunities:

McKinney Family Philanthropic Fellows

Discovery Park Looking for Summer Undergraduate Researchers

Social Justice Symposium at IUPUI

Tuesday, March 7
Torch Tuesday
Windsor Dining Court
Noon-1:00 p.m.

Gates Cambridge and Churchill Scholarship Info Sessions
HCRS 1066
5:00-6:00 p.m. (Gates Cambridge)
6:00-7:00 p.m. (Churchill)

Wednesday, March 22
Rhodes, Mitchell, Marshall Scholarship Event
HCRS 1060
5:30-6:30 p.m.

Thursday, March 23
The Border and the Ban: Panel Discussion
STEAM Lab
5:45-6:45 p.m.

Human-Animal Relationships Film Series: Blackfish
HCRN 1145
5:30-7:00 p.m.

Monday, March 27
Leadership Toolbox: Narrating your honors experience in personal statements
HCRN 1145
6:00-7:00 p.m.

Tuesday, March 28
Global Committee's Cultural Fair
6:00-7:30 p.m.
Honors Hall

Wednesday, March 29
Cornerstone Neighborhood Event: Tickets to "Rent" performance and panel discussion
7:30-9:30 p.m.
Put your spin on Honors College events, apply to be a Programming Committee Co-Chair

The Honors College Programming Committees are the central groups for student-led programming and initiatives for both the college and residential honors student community.  

The Programming Committee plans and executes student-focused events tailored to a specific programming area. Programming Committees will also work with Honors College faculty on co-curricular student-focused programs throughout the year.  

All five committees will have two co-chairs to facilitate meetings and lead the group members in planning these community programs.

  • Social Committee
  • Global Committee
  • Interdisciplinary Academics Committee
  • Campus Outreach Committee
  • Community Service Committee
Programming Committee Co-Chairs are selected for an academic year term. Students must currently be in good standing with the Honors College to apply for one of the positions. Students may hold other leadership positions within the college including membership in another committee, but may not serve as co-chair of more than one committee.

CLICK HERE to read more about the expectations for co-chairs.

APPLY by Friday, March 31
It's movie time! The third installment in our 'Human Animal Film Series' features 'Blackfish'


This powerful, influential film takes a critical look at the practice of keeping killer whales in captivity at parks such as Seaworld.  Discussion will include what has changed since the film was released just four years ago.

Join Professor Nadine Dolby for informative conversation and this captivating documentary.

Thursday, March 23
5:30 p.m.
HCRN 1145

Considering the Gates Cambridge or Churchill scholarship programs?

TONIGHT you have the rare opportunity to hear directly from Purdue's prestigious scholarship winners about this program for those committed to improving the lives of others.


Join us at 5:00 p.m. for Gates Cambridge details and at 6:00 p.m. for Churchill info.

Gates Cambridge Scholar Marisa Henry (Purdue 2016) will skype in from Cambridge to describe what graduate school is like at Cambridge and what qualities foundations are looking for.

We will also have Churchill Scholar Emily Erickson (Purdue 2015) skyping in to discuss her year in the program and Churchill Scholar-elect Shovik Bandyopadhyay, talking about applying through Purdue with  the National and International Scholarships Office .

TONIGHT
5:00-6:00 p.m. (Gates Cambridge RSVP)
6:00-7:00 p.m. (Churchill RSVP)
HCRS 1066

Milad Alucozai (Purdue 2014)
Join our "insider conversation" about the Rhodes, Mitchell and Marshall scholarships

Wednesday, March 22
5:30-6:30 p.m.
HCRS 1060 (RSVP)
  • Special guests David Johnson, Rhodes Scholarship District IX Secretary and Milad Alucozai, Mitchell Scholar and Purdue alumnus
  • Dinner and discussion of the similarities and differences of the three scholarship programs
First-year through early graduate students are welcome to attend.  We begin applications for 2018-19 scholarships in the coming weeks.

Find out what foundations mean by their leadership, service and outstanding academic achievement criteria. Explore what it means to "fight the world's fight." Learn how a Rhodes, Mitchell or Marshall scholarship could change your lives and the lives of others.


The border and the ban: A discussion of the Trump administration's travel bans and the wall at the USA-Mexico border

The executive order banning travel from several predominantly Muslim countries is back. 

Hundreds, once again, are left in a state of uncertainty, trapped in the middle ground of airports here and abroad and international students/scholars, immigrants and naturalized citizens continue to feel vulnerable. 

Similarly, the discourse surrounding "The Wall" separating the Mexico-U.S. border, and the reported raids by ICE against undocumented immigrants, has generated deep anxiety about American democracy and diversity.
 
We invite you to join us for a panel discussion on the impact and implications of the ban, and the future of borders, both physical and political. 
 





Panelists:
  • Prof. James McCann: Department of Political Science
  • Prof. Ellen Gruenbaum: Department of Anthropology, works in Sudan
  • Dr. Akram Almakki: Nephrologist at IU-Arnett
  • Meron Tamene and Pablo Balcazar: students reporting on their recent Study Away experience at the Mexico-U.S. border 
Thursday, March 23
5:45-6:45 p.m. 
HCRS STEAM Lab
Help create a more inclusive, diverse Honors College community: Apply now to be our first Student Diversity Officer

Applications due to Rachel Newell (newellr@purdue.edu) by March 29

  • Help the college stay at the forefront of diversity and inclusion
  • Serve as a liaison between Honors College faculty/staff and students
  • Assist with programmatic initiatives supporting HC students who may belong to underrepresented communities 
  • Help with new student orientation; planning networking events, panel discussions and soliciting student feedback; conducting research and representing concerns to HC administration

This position involves 5 hours per week, at a rate of $10 per hour.
You must be a current Honors College student to apply
  • Interested?
  • Submit your CV or resume and a written response to both of the following questions (200-word limit for each)
  1. What personal and/or academic opportunities have you had to think about issues of diversity and inclusion?
  2. Based on your experience in Purdue Honors College, what additional creative and programmatic approaches would you recommend to strengthen the diversity of our honors community?
Interviews will be conducted the first two weeks of April.
For more information, contact Dr. Megha Anwer (manwer@purdue.edu) or Rachel Newell (newellr@purdue.edu).  

Leadership Toolbox: Narrating your honors experience in personal statements

Many applications require personal statements, from graduate school to international scholarships. 

The most difficult part of writing a personal statement can be articulating one's experiences for a specific audience. 

Join Priya Sirohi for a workshop on crafting different kinds of personal statements based on your Honors College experience. 

Pizza will be provided!

Monday, March 27
HCRN 1145
6:00-7:00 p.m.
Global Committee Cultural Fair
globe.jpg

  • Travel the world and expand your perspective right inside the Honors Hall. The college's Global Committee is organizing a grand display of different foods, customs, artifacts and ideas connected to the various student groups and cultures on campus.


Tuesday, March 28
6:00-7:30 p.m.
Honors Hall

Features:
Stonebraker (2nd from left) works with HONR 299 students
Making Greater Lafayette Greater: Honors course tackles challenges, connects communities

While Purdue students emerge after graduation as experts on their  campus community, many have little knowledge about the areas  surrounding their university.  

In essence, they're strangers to the very cities that depend on them.  Cities, that are hungry to keep them here.  In many ways, it's understandable. Student schedules are jam-packed, most lack transportation and some feel they're just passing through-here one day, on to bigger things the next.

But what if a class could change that mind-set? Could an education about community, improve that community? Could it form a lasting-bond?

Professor Ilana Stonebraker argues yes.  She devised an Honors College course, HONR 299: Making Greater Lafayette Greater, around those themes.  Just last week, it helped earn her a prestigious award in her field.
 
"I want to introduce students to the City of Lafayette, so they actually go there," Stonebraker explained.  "I want to create a feeling of ownership over West Lafayette and Lafayette, so students feel like they are part of this community, that they aren't just transient, that they truly have stakes in this area."   READ MORE

Professor brings cricket spitting to the Honors College

If bugs bug you, you haven't met entomology professor Tom Turpin.  He's so comfortable with the creatures he studies, eating or spitting them is natural conversation.

"You can't spit a cricket if the antennae or the legs are out of your mouth," Turpin said, describing the official rules of an unusual Purdue competition.  "The cricket has to be entirely in your mouth."

Turpin is the creator of Bug Bowl, part of  Spring Fest.  The massive science outreach celebration showcases the lighter side of higher education.  READ MORE
Opportunities:
McKinney Family Philanthropic Fellows 
(March 31 deadline)

Are you an ambitious activist who would thrive in a career resolving the most complex, environmental challenges?

Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, in partnership with the McKinney Family Foundation, is looking for four environmentally ambitious students to serve as McKinney Family Philanthropic Fellows.

This fellowship includes:
  • A 36-credit, 2-year, master's degree in philanthropic studies
  • A paid graduate assistantship
  • Certificate in fundraising management

Click HERE for more information about the required criteria and application process.
Social Justice Symposium at IUPUI





This FREE daylong conference for students, faculty and staff is designed to help develop your understanding of the many intersections of social justice.

Purdue's office of Diversity and Inclusion would like to take a number of students to this event.  

If you are interested, please email Annette Brown (abbrown@purdue.edu) by next Monday, March 27.

Act now! Discovery Park is looking for summer undergraduate researchers

lab_worker_woman.jpg
Discovery Park is piloting the second phase of its Undergraduate Research Internship Program this summer for undergraduate researchers. 

Building on the strategic themes -- global health, global sustainability and global security -- Discovery Park will bring together select groups of undergraduates, graduate mentors and faculty.

Building on the momentum from the launch of the Institute for Global Security and Defense Innovation, the summer program will focus on issues surrounding global security. The program also seeks to foster and increase visibility for interdisciplinary research across campus.

From March 20 to April 2 students may submit applications for up to three projects the faculty have proposed and this program has approved.  All eligible student applications will be forwarded to faculty project supervisors for review and final selection. View the projects here

The program usually requires that students have at least sophomore standing when applying and are going to continue their undergraduate studies for at least one semester after the program ends (i.e., they graduate on or after December 2017). Each participating student will earn a $4,500 summer fellowship. For more information about the program, contact Heather Anthrop hanthrop@purdue.edu .
 

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