December 5, 2015


In This Issue



Handling Leftovers Safely 
Martha Murphy 
Foods & Nutrition for Limited Resource Families Agent
 
 
Your Thanksgiving turkey was great. You've now had your fill of turkey and dressing. What can I do with the leftover turkey?
Enhancing Your Relationships This Holiday Season
Chuckie Hessong 
Family & Child Development Agent  

We all know personal relationships take hard work. They don't just happen; they require attention. A relationship can become stronger and more satisfying by focusing on your friendship with the other person and learning how to manage your differences.   ...Complete Article
Turkey Fettuccine Skillet Recipe

8 ounces uncooked fettuccine 
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped celery
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon canola oil
1 cup sliced fresh mushrooms
2 cups fat-free milk
1 teaspoon salt-free seasoning blend
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1/2 cup fat-free half-and-half
1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese
3 cups cubed cooked turkey
3/4 cup shredded Part Skim Mozzarella Cheese
  1. Cook fettuccine according to package directions. Meanwhile, in a large ovenproof skillet coated with cooking spray, sauté the onion, celery and garlic in oil for 3 minutes. Add mushrooms; cook and stir until vegetables are tender. Stir in the milk, seasoning blend and salt. Bring to a boil.
  2. Combine cornstarch and half-and-half until smooth; stir into skillet. Cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened and bubbly. Stir in Parmesan cheese just until melted.
  3. Stir in turkey. Drain fettuccine; add to turkey mixture. Heat through. Sprinkle with mozzarella cheese. Broil 4-6 in. from the heat for 2-3 minutes or until cheese is melted. Yield: 6 servings.
Nutritional Facts
1 cup equals 361 calories, 7 g fat (3 g saturated fat), 76 mg cholesterol, 343 mg sodium, 38 g carbohydrate, 2 g fiber, 34 g protein.
Keep the Happy in Your Winter Holidays: 
Stay Warm and Safe

Most of us look forward to the fall and winter holidays as times for celebrating, feasting, homecoming, and gathering, connecting with our deepest spiritual roots, saying goodbye to the old year and ringing in the new.
Yet the record shows a season of Menorahs and other celebratory candles igniting the drapes, Butterballs flaming up from their fryers, improperly installed woodstoves and combusting Christmas trees destroying homes. Click here to read entire article for tips on keeping your home safe. 

Source:  www.extension.org
Nourishing the Next Generation 
This newsletter is a bi-monthly publication of K-State Research and Extension designed for grandmothers and grandfathers who care for a child (or children) of any age: infants through teens. Others who may be interested include other family members, many child care providers, neighbors and friends.

You Asked It!
This is a monthly newsletter published by K-State Research and Extension's Rapid Response Center with news articles based on questions received, current food safety issues, or information based on the time of the year.

What
When
Where

2016 FCS Lessons

February 23, 2016 and

March 22, 2016
Starting at 10:00 am
Southeast Area K-State Research and Extension Facility
400 Hwy and 32nd (Ness)
Parsons, KS 67357



Meet Our Agents

Barbara Ames
Nutrition, Health & Food Safety
Phone: 620-331-2690
bames@ksu.edu

Chuckie Hessong
Family & Child Development
Phone: 620-724-8233
chuckiehessong@ksu.edu

Kylie Ludwig
Family Resource Management & Community Development
Phone: 620-784-5337
ludwigk@ksu.edu

Martha Murphy
Foods & Nutrition for
Limited Resource Families
Phone: 620-232-1930
mmurphy@ksu.edu



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