Freedom Forum

A Monthly E-publication of

The National Center for Law & Policy 
 
January 2012

Dean Speaking
In This Issue
· NCLP's Proposition 8 Legal Brief Employed in the Defense of Marriage in Pennsylvania.
· NCLP President Gives Lecture Series on Constitutional Rights in the Public Schools.
· Essay: Honoring a King Who Employed Religious Liberty in The Cause of Righteousness and Justice.

NCLP's Proposition 8 Legal Brief Employed in the Defense of Marriage in Pennsylvania.

 

Late last year, National Center For Law & Policy attorneys were asked by the Alliance Defense Fund (ADF) whether our 2010 legal brief filed at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in the Perry v. Schwarzenegger (Prop. 8) litigation could also be filed in the matter of O'Connor v. Tobits, a Pennsylvania case involving a challenge to the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA).  Naturally, we said "yes." 

 

GLBT legal organizations have for years been desperately trying to assume the moral mantle of the black civil rights movement by misrepresenting to the courts and the culture that GLBT sexual orientation, like race, is a fixed and unchangeable characteristic. The truth is sexual orientation is actually quite mutable and transitory. The NCLP's brief destroys the myth of homosexuality's "immutability" by telling the powerfully redemptive stories of men and women who, though once deeply entrenched in the GBLT lifestyle, are now living successful heterosexual lives.  

 

The NCLP's amicus (friend of the court) brief was filed in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania last month by local counsel William A. Bonner, Esq. on behalf of Parents and Friends of Ex Gays (PFOX).  The NCLP currently represents PFOX and Desert Streams Ministries in the Perry v. Schwarzenegger litigation, and we expect a ruling on the constitutionality of Proposition 8 any day now.   Not surprisingly, the ex-gay community is denied and despised by GLBT activists since their very existence  contradicts central tenets of GLBT propaganda.  

 

"We are honored to represent the ex-gay community and are pleased that our legal work on behalf of marriage has been acknowledged by other organizations like ADF who are with us on the front lines championing marriage," declared NCLP president Dean Broyles.  "I am encouraged that our brief is now being employed to defend marriage in Pennsylvania.  We pray for the successful defense of DOMA there and that California's constitutional amendment defining marriage as only between a man and a woman is affirmed."

 

NCLP President Gives Lecture Series on Constitutional Rights in the Public Schools.

 

In late 2011 and early 2012, NCLP President Dean Broyles presented a two part series entitled: Constitutional Rights in the Public Schools to the San Diego Strategic Forum. In November 2011, the first portion of presentation focused on student's rights of religious freedom and freedom of speech. 

 

The January 2012 presentation entitled "Sexual Liberty" on Campus focused on the radical GLBT agenda (including SB 48 and SB 777), sex education, abortion, and parental rights.  Dean Broyles is available to speak at churches and organizations about constitutional rights in the public schools and many other important issues implicating religious freedom, the right to life, and traditional marriage. 

 

The San Diego Strategic Forum is a monthly gathering providing strategic awareness, information, tools, discussion and encouragement; empowering Christians to positively impact the culture with a biblical worldview; guiding ministry leaders in launching or expanding an effective Christian citizenship ministry at churches or within their sphere of influence; and, offering a venue for leaders from area churches and ministries to network with each other and with legal, legislative, and policy organizations.  "The San Diego Strategic Forum has been a powerful force for good in our community and state," declared Dean Broyles.  "It is where, in late 2007, the Proposition 8 effort was born." 

 

On February 6, 2012, Pastor Jim Domen of California Family Council will present:  Sexual Confusion:  Lesbian, Gay, Transgender, and Questioning?  We strongly encourage pastors and youth workers to attend this important Strategic Forum meeting.  For more information about the San Diego Strategic Forum please contact: sdstrategicforum@cox.net or (951) 354-8362.

Essay:  Honoring a King Who Employed Religious Liberty in The Cause of Righteousness and Justice.

 

Religious liberty has often been called our "first" freedom.  This is not only because it was protected by the First Amendment of the Bill of Rights, but more importantly because of religious freedom's preeminent position among the various fundamental rights our founders held dear.  At their very core, they understood that inalienable human rights are not conferred by men, but are endowed by our Creator. 

 

So, it is quite fitting that religious freedom and Martin Luther King, Jr. are both celebrated on the same day this year (January 16).  Religious Freedom Day honors the anniversary of the Virginia Statute on Religious Freedom, a forerunner of the First Amendment's protections, written by Thomas Jefferson and enacted in 1786.  Martin Luther King, Jr. Day acknowledges a pastor who effectively employed his God-given religious freedom as a heroic leader in the cause of justice and righteousness for the oppressed. 

 

And less than a week before the concurrent celebrations of Religious Freedom and MLK, the U.S. Supreme Court in a rare 9-0 opinion gave America a precious gift by boldly declaring that the First Amendment's Establishment and Free Exercise clauses actually mean that religious freedom should be protected.  The unanimous court in Hosanna-Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church and School v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, upheld the right of churches and religious groups to employ individuals whose beliefs are consistent with the organization, without government interference.  This opinion is vitally important because religious freedom has been greatly weakened by the high court over the past 60 years and we have increasingly seen "sexual liberty" trumping religious liberty where the two conflict.    

  

Jefferson, for his part, wrote that because "God hath created the mind free," man has a "natural right" to believe, worship, and profess or not to believe, worship, and profess as conscience dictates, free from government coercion or restraint.   He correctly believed that his work on the Statute was second only in importance to his authorship of the Declaration of Independence.  History would prove Jefferson right. 

 

Martin Luther King, Jr., employed religious liberty to great effect advocating for freedom for his oppressed African-American brother and sisters.  Like his prime example Jesus Christ, King intentionally and sacrificially dedicated his life to serve God and to serve others--both in his congregation and far outside the walls of his church.  "The end of life is not to be happy, nor to achieve pleasure and avoid pain," King said, "but to do the will of God, come what may." As he served and led, he did so with the conviction that God cares deeply about justice and righteousness.  And he understood the role of the church in society.  "The church must be reminded that it is not the master or the servant of the state," he said in Strength to Love, "but rather the conscience of the state." 

 

King was not blind to the existence of evil in the world, nor its proper antidote.  "Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that."  And he understood that leaders must lead by principled moral example.  "A genuine leader is not a searcher for consensus but a molder of consensus."   He personally experienced the sacrifice it took to stand for what is right:  "The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience," he declared, "but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy."

 

And King believed that to be silent when faced with unrighteousness and injustice was sin.  According to him, "We will have to repent in this generation not merely for the hateful words and actions of the bad people but for the appalling silence of the good people."  King would be appalled that the evangelical church has allowed its clarion voice as the "conscience of the state" to be muted by the minority cultural elite.  Today, as in King's era, it is our God-given duty as well as our God-given right of religious freedom which empower us as Christians to be salt and light in this present darkness--to speak the Truth in love on behalf of marriage, the unborn, the downtrodden, and the persecuted. 

 

I pray that God will raise up courageous and winsome Christian pastors and leaders in this generation who, like Martin Luther King, Jr., will understand the dark threats to righteousness and justice, will know what needs to be done, and will do it with excellence and passion to the glory of God.   

 

 "We are honored to represent the ex-gay community and are pleased that our legal work on behalf of marriage has been acknowledged by other organizations like ADF who are with us on the front lines championing marriage.  I am encouraged that our brief is now being employed to defend marriage in Pennsylvania."

 
Dean Broyles

 

Please visit our new NCLP website www.nclplaw.org and provide us with your feedback.  

 

  

 

Dean Photo

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

" . . . no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place, or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief, but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinions in matters of Religion . . . ." 

 

Virginia Statute on Religious Freedom, 1786.  

 

  

"Requiring a church to accept or retain an unwanted minister, or punishing a church for failing to do so, intrudes upon more than a mere employment deci­sion. Such action interferes with the internal governance of the church, depriving the church of control over the selection of those who will personify its beliefs. By impos­ing an unwanted minister, the state infringes the Free Exercise Clause, which protects a religious group's right to shape its own faith and mission through its appointments. According the state the power to determine which individ­uals will minister to the faithful also violates the Estab­lishment Clause, which prohibits government involvement in such ecclesiastical decisions." 

 

Hosanna-Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church and School v. EEOC 

 

 

Freedom is worth fighting for:  Never give up!

 

"The end of life is not to be happy, nor to achieve pleasure and avoid pain, but to do the will of God, come what may." 

 

Martin Luther King, Jr. 

 

"The church must be reminded that it is not the master or the servant of the state, but rather the conscience of the state." 

 

Martin Luther King, Jr, Strength to Love 

 

"A genuine leader is not a searcher for consensus but a molder of consensus."  

 

Martin Luther King, Jr. 

 

"We will have to repent in this generation not merely for the hateful words and actions of the bad people but for the appalling silence of the good people." 

 

Martin Luther King, Jr. 

The National Center for Law & Policy is a non-profit 501(c)(3) legal defense organization dedicated to the protection and promotion of religious freedom, parental rights, and other civil liberties. The NCLP engages in constitutional litigation in state and federal courts and is also active in the areas of public policy and education.  


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