Life Science Nation Newsletter  | November 10,  2016  |  Issue 187

  The LSN Story   |   Investor Platform   |   Company Platform   |   RESI Conference   |   Fundraising Consulting
Life Science Investor Mandates (Nov. 2  - Nov. 9)
Invests in Pharma/Biotech, Devices and Healthcare IT
Seeks Healthcare IT Solutions and Healthcare Services
Seeks Shipping Medtech Products That Reduce the Cost of Healthcare
Looks Opportunistically for Biotech and Medtech Innovation
In This Issue
News
Nature BioEntrepreneur Features LSN: Aligning Needs
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LSN Book

LSN Videos
RESI Boston Investors Panel

How to Use Your Pitch Deck to Pique Investor Interest 
By Lucy Parkinson, Director of Research, LSN

To raise capital for an early stage biotech or medtech venture, you're going to need a pitch deck. But it's very hard to make an engaging pitch deck. At LSN we see a lot of pitch decks from our clients and RESI Innovation Challenge applicants, and as we engage with investors every day, we've found out a lot about what works and what doesn't.

The goal of the pitch deck is to get the first meeting

It's very important to bear in mind that the pitch deck is not, in and of itself, going to sell your round. You, the CEO, are going to sell your round. The deck's purpose is to pique the investor's interest for a deeper conversation with you. You can't go into depth on the company's value proposition in 12 slides but what you can do is create an interest in learning more.

The hardest part is making it short enough 
nvestors receive dozens of pitches per day. The easier and faster it is for them to digest your company's pitch, the more likely you are to hear back from them. A pitch deck should generally be 10-12 slides long. Many life science companies use much longer decks in the hope of explaining their scientific or business case in full; unfortunately, we've seen many that are 30 pages or even longer. A long deck is likely to put a hurdle in the investor's path to your door, because you're asking for a lot of assessment time before your relationship with them can even begin...

Korean Life Science Companies Taking Center Stage of Cross-Border Collaborations
By Shaoyu Chang, MD, MPH, Director of Research & Asia Business Development Liaison

With the rapid growth of Asia's biotech sector, cross-border activities are on the rise. Previously, we discussed how Greater China investors are now looking for opportunities beyond their geography. We'd like to use this posting to examine Korea's biotech and how a regional player can take a significant part on the global stage.

Fueled by growing economy and strong government will, Korea is estimated to become the world's 5th biggest spender of bio-related R&D. From 2006 to 2015, the 50-million population country has the largest number of total drug trials in Asia. We searched LSN Company Database and found more than Korean 450 entities in biopharma, medtech, healthtech, R&D service, and suppliers. The quantity and diversity of organizations indicate a fledging ecosystem...



RESI San Francisco Panel Announcement:
Big Pharma
By Cole Bunn, Senior Research Analyst, LSN

As we gear up for the biggest RESI event of the year, during the heavily anticipated JPM week, we're happy to once again announce the Big Pharma panel. This is typically one of the most popular panels at the RESI conference, and for good reason - large pharmaceutical and biotech companies, through a variety of deal structures, are looking earlier and earlier for assets, but tend to represent a daunting challenge for entrepreneurs seeking to successfully engage and navigate.

Senior-level executives from some of the world's top pharmaceutical companies will provide some color around their process and strategy, and how entrepreneurs can best prepare to present to and work with organizations like theirs.

Big Pharma panelists will include the following:
  • Monica Viziano, Sr. Director, Business Development, Gilead
  • Barbara Sosnowski, VP External R&D Innovation, Pfizer
  • Lesley Stolz, Senior Director of Transactions, Johnson & Johnson Innovation (JLABS)
  • Christian Schubert, Director, Corporate Development & Strategy, Biogen
  • Jeremy Grunstein, Executive Director, Business Development, Amgen