Volume 34: IMPLEMENTING STRATEGIC DIRECTION
February 2017
TWO VIEWS OF VISION
by Lovett H. Weems, Jr. 
Director of Lewis Center for Church Leadership at Wesley Theological Seminary

What kind of vision helps a church finds its way forward? Lovett H. Weems, Jr., says a vision needn't be grandiose, nor is the process necessarily linear. Drawing on Margaret Wheatley's "circular" understanding of vision, he explains that visioning can involve a series of small, next-step visions that become a field of energy from which a larger vision emerges. ...  More
VISION IN ACTION
by Brian Zehr 
Co-Founder and Leadership Architect of Intentional Impact

Vision is a snapshot of the future that allows leaders to engage people into forward movement. The snapshot shows why movement is needed and what the results will be as you move forward. If you are going to grow as a leader, then your ability to see, and let others see, needs to grow as well. The bible teaches us that without a vision the people perish. It's true.  ... More  
WHEN THE RUBBER MEETS THE ROAD
by Dave Zietlow
President and Lead Coach of DPZ Leadership

Recently the pastor of a growing and healthy church reflected in a meeting that "Our church has worked through a process of evaluating what we are good at and where God has blessed us. We have prayed about this thought about where we feel God is leading us to fulfill needs in our community. Now we need to implement that strategy and we don't see many examples of how to successfully accomplish that task!"  ... More
THE 8-STEP PROCESS FOR LEADING CHANGE
by John Kotter
Co-Founder of Kotter International
 
Regarded by many as the authority on leadership and change, John P. Kotter is a New York Times best-selling author, award winning business and management thought leader, business entrepreneur, inspirational speaker and Harvard Professor. His ideas, books, speeches, and company ...  More
Readings Related to Implementing Strategic Direction found in the LEAD website resources.
MEMORIES, HOPES, AND CONVERSATIONS
by Mark Lau Branson

Memories, Hopes, and Conversations is a powerful resource that introduces readers to Appreciative Inquiry - a transformational organizational change process that focuses on the strengths of a group. The second edition has been revised and expanded throughout, featuring important new materials on leadership and missional frameworks, as well as five chapters from pastors describing the transformational experiences of their churches and neighbors using Appreciative Inquiry.  ...  More
BEING A STRATEGIC LEADER IS ABOUT ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS
by Lisa Lai

If you asked the world's most successful business leaders what it means to "be strategic," how many different answers do you think you'd get? Consider this number: 115,800,000. It's the number of unique links returned when I searched online for "strategic leadership." ... More
THE BEST STRATEGIC LEADERS BALANCE AGILITY AND CONSISTENCY
by John Coleman

As a former consultant, I have a deep and abiding love for the use of 2×2 matrices in business strategy. My favorites are those that highlight two factors that seem, at first glance, in conflict. I find these particularly relevant to personal development, as individuals often must resolve the tensions between competing values and traits and must carefully monitor their own strengths so those strengths don't lapse into weaknesses.  ... More
4 WAYS TO IMPROVE YOUR STRATEGIC THINKING SKILLS
by Nina Bowman

If you've ever received feedback that you "need to be more strategic," you know how frustrating it can feel. To add insult to injury, the feedback rarely comes with any concrete guidance on what to do about it. One of my coaching clients, Lisa, a vice president of HR, was in this situation and explains, "I was just told to think bigger picture and to be more strategic. It felt like I had been given the definition of a word by using the same word. It just wasn't helpful."

So what specific steps can you take to be more strategic in your current role?  ... More
HOW STARBUCKS' CULTURE BRINGS ITS STRATEGY TO LIFE
by Nina Bowman

In most organizations, culture and strategy tend to be discussed in separate conversations. Executives know that culture is important and that a negative culture can hurt company performance, but they often don't know what to do about it. Or they attempt to improve the situation by launching a culture initiative to "make the workplace more positive." What most executive teams typically fail to do is to connect the company's culture with how the company makes its strategy work.  ... More
PREVIOUS eLEAD TOPICS

Recalibrating (January 2017)
Innovative Community Fundraising (December 2016)
Sustaining Spiritual Health (November 2016)
Employment and the Local Church (October 2016)
Sermon Series (September 2016)
STAY CONNECTED: