January 2016
Monthly Newsletter

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

Pediatric Healthcare Heroes

Do you know someone that goes above and beyond for children or has done something extraordinary for a child?  If so, please nominate that pediatric healthcare hero!  iEMSC will be taking nominations all year long for the amazing work that happens on behalf of children all over the State of Indiana. Please make your nomination today!  All nominations will be considered for the 2016 Healthcare Heroes Awards breakfast.  You can nominate your healthcare hero by completing this nomination form and then emailing it to Courtney VanJelgerhuis at courtney.vanjelgerhuis@indianapolisems.org


Pediatric Care Coordinator

Indiana EMSC is committed to providing support and technical consultation to organizations interested in developing a Pediatric Care Coordinator role. We are in the process of developing a quarterly newsletter designed specifically to support the role of Pediatric Care Coordination. Each edition will focus on specific, achievable and impactful areas for improvement.  To sign up for this newsletter, please contact  Courtney VanJelgerhuis, Indiana EMSC Program Manager.

PEPP INSTRUCTOR CERTIFICATION

Do you want to be a PEPP Instructor so you can help your staff become more comfortable in treating pediatric emergencies?  Indiana EMSC will be offering a certification course on January 23, 2016.  This one-day course is required after you have completed the online course to become certified as a PEPP provider. Participants for this certification will need to currently be an instructor in one AHA course, and have completed the online training to become a PEPP provider.  As part of this free certification, participants need to commit to teaching at least 1 class a year in order to increase the knowledge of PEPP.   To register for this course, please contact Courtney VanJelgerhuis .

DOWNLOAD YOUR TOOLKIT HERE:

PEDIATRIC ADVOCATE CORNER

This section or our newsletter is focused on highlighting information from the Pediatric Readiness Survey that our emergency departments participated in during 2014.  Results for Indiana, as well as nationally, demonstrate that there is a real need for us to improve our readiness to care for children.  The EMSC National Resource Center has created a Pediatric Readiness Toolkit to assist emergency departments with this process (download this toolkit by clicking on the checklist above).  

Pediatric Readiness Assessment Portal is Reopen!

Did you participate in the 2013/2014 Pediatric Readiness Assessment?  Want to know how your efforts to improve pediatric readiness in your facility compare to your assessment score?  You now have the opportunity to show how far you come and help identify where you still have room for improvement.

The Pediatric Readiness (Peds Ready) assessment portal reopened on November 1, providing hospitals an opportunity to reassess their readiness in caring for ill and injured children. Upon completion of the assessment, respondents will receive an electronic gap analysis report containing their new Readiness Score, compared to their 2013-14 Readiness Score (if applicable), as well as a breakdown of the overall scoring. To access the portal, go to www.pedsready.org.




SPECIAL INTEREST

Winter Safety Tips
 
Up to now we have had an unseasonably warm winter but with several months left to go, there is no doubt that Indiana will receive its fair share of cold weather.  Remember these important safety tips to keep our kids safe during the the upcoming winter months.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends:

What to Wear 
  • Dress infants and children warmly for outdoor activities. Several thin layers will keep them dry and warm. Don't forget warm boots, gloves or mittens, and a hat.
     
  • The rule of thumb for older babies and young children is to dress them in one more layer of clothing than an adult would wear in the same conditions.
     
  • Blankets, quilts, pillows, bumpers, sheepskins and other loose bedding should be kept out of an infant's sleeping environment because they are associated with suffocation deaths and may contribute to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Sleep clothing like one-piece sleepers or wearable blankets is preferred.
     
  • If a blanket must be used to keep a sleeping infant warm, it should be thin and tucked under the crib mattress, reaching only as far as the baby's chest, so the infant's face is less likely to become covered by bedding materials.
     
Hypothermia 
  • Hypothermia develops when a child's temperature falls below normal due to exposure to colder temperatures. It often happens when a youngster is playing outdoors in extremely cold weather without wearing proper clothing or when clothes get wet. It can occur more quickly in children than in adults.
     
  • As hypothermia sets in, the child may shiver and become lethargic and clumsy. Speech may become slurred and body temperature will decline in more severe cases.
     
  • If you suspect your child is hypothermic, call 911 at once. Until help arrives, take the child indoors, remove any wet clothing, and wrap him in blankets or warm clothes. 
     
Frostbite 
  • Frostbite happens when the skin and outer tissues become frozen. This condition tends to happen on extremities like the fingers, toes, ears and nose. They may become pale, gray and blistered. At the same time, the child may complain that his/her skin burns or has become numb.
     
  • If frostbite occurs, bring the child indoors and place the frostbitten parts of her body in warm, not hot, water (about the temperature of most hot tubs is recommended, approximately 104 degrees). Warm washcloths may be applied to frostbitten nose, ears and lips.
     
  • Do not rub the frozen areas.
     
  • After a few minutes, dry and cover the child with clothing or blankets. Give him/her something warm to drink.
     
  • If the numbness continues for more than a few minutes, call your doctor.
     
Winter Health 
  • If your child suffers from winter nosebleeds, try using a cold air humidifier in the child's room at night. Saline nose drops or petrolatum jelly may help keep nasal tissues moist. If bleeding is severe or recurrent, consult your pediatrician.
     
  • Many pediatricians feel that bathing two or three times a week is enough for an infant's first year. More frequent baths may dry out the skin, especially during the winter.
     
  • Cold weather does not cause colds or flu. The viruses that cause colds and flu tend to be more common in the winter, when children are in school and are in closer contact with each other. Frequent hand washing and teaching your child to sneeze or cough into the bend of her elbow may help reduce the spread of colds and flu.
  • Children 6 months of age and up should get the influenza vaccine to reduce their risk of catching the flu. It is not too late to get the vaccine! Around 80% of all influenza illness generally occurs in January, February, and March.

Winter Sports and Activities
  • Set reasonable time limits on outdoor play to prevent hypothermia and frostbite. Have children come inside periodically to warm up.
     
  • Using alcohol or drugs before any winter activity, like snowmobiling or skiing, is dangerous and should not be permitted in any situation. 

Sledding 
  • Keep sledders away from motor vehicles.
     
  • Children should be supervised while sledding.
     
  • Keep young children separated from older children.
     
  • Sledding feet first or sitting up, instead of lying down head-first, may prevent head injuries.
     
  • Consider having your child wear a helmet while sledding.
     
  • Use steerable sleds, not snow disks or inner tubes.
     
  • Sleds should be structurally sound and free of sharp edges and splinters, and the steering mechanism should be well lubricated.
     
  • Sled slopes should be free of obstructions like trees or fences, be covered in snow not ice, not be too steep (slope of less than 30ยบ), and end with a flat runoff.
     
  • Avoid sledding in crowded areas.

Sun Protection
  • The sun's rays can still cause sunburn in the winter, especially when they reflect off snow.  Make sure to cover your child's exposed skin with sunscreen and consider using sunglasses. 

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EDUCATION AND  PEDIATRIC RELATED EVENTS


Upcoming Courses:
  • Indiana School Nurse Emergency Care Course
    Indiana EMSC and the Indiana Department of Education are pleased to announce the Indiana School Nurse Emergency Care course. This course is a hybrid course with an online portion to be completed prior to attending a one-day in-person training that will take place in the summer of 2016.  
     
    Online training modules include topics such as:
    • The School Nurse Role in Emergency Care
    • Legal Issues in Nursing
    • Assessment and Triage
    • Medical Emergencies
    • Abdominal and Genitourinary Emergencies
    • EENT and Dental Emergencies
    • Emergencies Involving Mental or Behavioral Health
    • School Emergency Response and Crisis Management
     
    To register for this course, please click here
     
  • Webinar: Injury and Violence Prevention: Gaining Momentum in 2016
    Join the  South to Southwest (S2SW) Injury Prevention Network and the Safe States Alliance for an inspiring first-of-the year presentation about why the work we do in injury and violence prevention is important, relevant, and exciting. This is a great opportunity to find inspiration and motivation for your work in 2016. This webinar will be held January 6, 2016 from 2:00 - 3:30pm ET. The speaker, Dr. David Hemenway, Professor of health policy at the Harvard School of Public Health, and author of the book, While We Were Sleeping: Success Stories in Injury and Violence Prevention, will outline how the public health science behind injury prevention has enabled our field to accomplish great things in the past, and help us understand the possibilities for the future. This important presentation will help ground your work in a broader context, and help you understand the wider field of injury prevention. To register, visit:  https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8256354130260863490
  • National Child Passenger Safety Certification. Child car seats reduce the risk of injury by 71% yet 73% of child restraints are used incorrectly and one-third of children are not using any type of restraint whatsoever. One way to help ensure that car restraints are being used correctly is to become a certified child passenger safety technician (CPST) through Safe Kids Worldwide ( http://cert.safekids.org/become-tech ). This is a four day course with three quizzes, three skills assessments and one car seat clinic. It is open to anyone who would like to become a technician. With the fee of $85 to sign up for the class, you are provided with a workbook that is essential to learning how to become a technician. Getting certified may be time-intensive but it is worth it when provided families the education they need to protect their child's future.    
     
  • Free Pediatric Online Training
  • FREE TRAINING - The Center for Global Health at the Colorado School of Public Health Online Pediatrics in Disasters Course
    Although a quarter of the world's population is under the age of five, 50 percent of the victims of man-made and natural disasters are children. Children are vulnerable in disasters for physiological, psychological and developmental reasons. Too often medical staff are ill-prepared for pediatric triage and emergency stabilization in terms of knowledge and experience, as well as equipment and supplies. The Pediatrics in Disaster training program trains health care providers to prioritize life-saving care for children in disasters. Because of the vulnerability of children and adolescents, pediatricians and other health professionals must ensure that local, regional and national disaster preparedness planning meets the specific needs of children and adolescents.  Click here to register
Contact Information:

Program Director:
Elizabeth Weinstein, M.D.

Program Manager:
Courtney VanJelgerhuis

3930 Georgetown Rd., Indianapolis, IN 46254
courtney.vanjelgerhuis@indianapolisems.org
(317) 630-7888