What is Sustainable Landscaping? - FREE Presentation on Monday, January 8th
Healing the earth, one yard at a time

January 2018 Newsletter


In this edition:

UPCOMING WILD ONES PROGRAMS
What is Sustainable Landscaping? - January 8
Wild Ones Book Club - January 20
Folklore of Plants - February 12
Plant Natives 2018! Symposium - March 17

VOLUNTEER TO HELP!

CERTIFICATE IN NATIVE PLANTS CLASSES
January - March 2018 Classes

INTERESTING INFORMATION

CONNECT WITH US


UPCOMING WILD ONES PROGRAMS

Monday, January 8
6:00 pm
green|spaces
63 E. Main St., Chattanooga
FREE and open to the public

Choosing native plants is a good start, but what else can we do to responsibly manage land?   Join Lyn Rutherford, Landscape Inspector for the City of Chattanooga, for an introduction to environmentally-friendly landscaping. 

Bring some tips to share!






Saturday, January 20
2:00 pm
4918 Marlow Drive, Red Bank TN
FREE for all Wild Ones Members


The Tennessee Valley Wild Ones Book Club's January book is Andrea Wulf's   Founding Gardeners: The Revolutionary Generation, Nature, and the Shaping of the American Nature.  Join us to discuss how the landscape design concepts of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams and James Madison evolved to prefer native plants.  The discussion will be led by Ann Brown. To benefit from this program, it is recommended that you read the book prior to the meeting.  See you then!




Monday, February 12
6:00 pm
green|spaces
63 E. Main Street, Chattanooga TN
FREE and open to the public

SAVE THE DATE!
March 17, 2018

Plant Natives 2018!  What's the Buzz? -- the sixth annual native plant symposium -- will be a great opportunity to learn about the types of native pollinators that visit our gardens and how we can foster all parts of their life cycles.  

The keynote speaker will be Heather Holm, author of Bees: An Identification and Native Plant Forage Guide.

Be sure to mark your calendar!


Certificate in Native Plants Classes

The Certificate in Native Plants program is designed to expand students' knowledge of botany, ecology, conservation, and uses of native flora in the southeastern United States. Students will get both classroom education and hands-on application to increase knowledge and skills that can be applied at home, in the community, and at work. The course setting will provide a common ground for native plant enthusiasts to meet and connect with others who share their interests. 

The CNP is designed to benefit both home gardeners and landscaping professionals alike.  You do NOT need to be working toward the Certificate in order to register for classes.

Most CNP classes are limited to 25 participants.  They fill up quickly, so register now to ensure your place.  

Class registration for early 2018 classes is currently open for:

Understanding Botanical Names
Instructor - John Manion
ELECTIVE CLASS
Saturday, January 13, 2018
9:00am - 12:00pm
Reflection Riding Arboretum & Nature Center


Invasive Plant Control
Instructor - John Evans
ELECTIVE CLASS
Saturday, February 10, 2018
9:00am - 12:00pm
Reflection Riding Arboretum & Nature Center


Native Plant Propagation Workshop - Seeds 
Instructor - John Evans
ELECTIVE CLASS
Saturday, March 10, 2018
9:00am - 12:00pm
Reflection Riding Arboretum & Nature Center
Native Plant Propagation Workshop - Cuttings & Divisions
Instructor - John Evans
ELECTIVE CLASS
Saturday, March 10, 2018
1:00pm - 4:00pm
Reflection Riding Arboretum & Nature Center
 INFO & REGISTER 




INTERESTING INFORMATION

Lookout Mountain Towns Join in 
Effort to Attract Bees

Lookout Mountain, Tn., and Lookout Mountain, Ga., are joining in the effort to attract bees.  Ann Brown said,  "The Bee City USA committee will be responsible for creating dialogue and hands-on educational programs and projects to raise awareness of the vital ecosystem service pollinators provide to our mountain environment."  Read more.



Ec o s ystems in the Southeast 
are Vu lner able to Climate Change
"From the mo untains to the coast, the southeastern U.S. contains ecosystems that harbor incredible biodiversity. Many of those ecosystems are already highly at risk from u rbanization and other human land-use change. Identifying the ecosystems at risk from climate change will help inform conservation and management to ensure we don't lose that biodiversity." 


NEW Book Available:
Woody Plants of Kentucky and Tennessee: 
The Complete Winter Guide to 
Their Identification and Use. 
For centuries people have used trees, shrubs, and woody vines for food, clothing, ritual, construction, scientific study, and more. However, these important plants are easy to overlook during the winter months, when the absence of leaves, fruit, and other distinguishing characteristics makes them difficult to recognize.

This comprehensive volume is the essential guide to woody plants in Kentucky, Tennessee, and surrounding states during the winter season. Featuring color images of more than four hundred species, this detailed botanical resource provides keys to the genera and species, as well as descriptions of the genera. The species accounts include useful information on Latin meanings, common names, habitats and distributions, and notes on toxicity, nativity, rarity, and wetland status. In addition, authors Ronald L. Jones and B. Eugene Wofford provide notes on practical uses for the plants, including food, medicine, fiber, and weapons.

Winter identification of woody plants can be a daunting exercise, but Jones and Wofford present clear and authoritative information that can help anyone spot these species in the wild. Whether taken into the field or enjoyed at home, Woody Plants of Kentucky and Tennessee: The Complete Winter Guide to Their Identification and Use is a comprehensive and accessible resource for professional and amateur botanists, students, commercial landscapers, homeowners, and outdoor enthusiasts.  Available at your local booksellers or via Indiebound (a searchable database of independent bookshops), Amazon, Barnes and Noble.



The Bitter Battle Over the World's 
Most Popular Insecticides
"When the Swedish study was published in April 2015, it made headlines around the world. It was the first to show that neonicotinoid chemicals - known as neonics - could harm bees in a real-world farming situation.  Bee populations are declining in many parts of the globe, a worrying sign for the crops and wild plants that rely on these pollinators for their survival. Parasites, disease and shrinking food resources are all prime suspects. But a link to neonics has become a major flashpoint."  Read more.

CONNECT WITH US

Become a Wild Ones Member!
Join the Tennessee Valley Chapter

See what's happening on our social media sites:

Wild Ones: Native Plants. Natural Landscapes is a national non-profit organization with over 50 chapters in 13 states that promotes environmentally sound landscaping practices to preserve biodiversity through the preservation, restoration and establishment of native plant communities. Please read more information about Wild Ones at www.wildones.org.
 
The Tennessee Valley Chapter presents guest speakers, field trips and other special events throughout the year, as well as an annual native plant and natural landscaping symposium in early spring. 
 
To contact our chapter, email us at tnvalleywildones@gmail.com