JUNE 2016

Splenic hemangiosarcoma is a malignant neoplasm of vascular endothelial origin which occurs more frequently in dogs than in any other species. It is diagnosed in middle-aged to older dogs with the following breeds over-represented in published studies: German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers.

Increasing evidence suggests that dysregulation of molecular pathways leading to overexpression of angiogenic growth factors and their receptors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor, and angiopoietins, is important in the pathogenesis of this malignancy.

The most common primary tumor site in the dog is the spleen. Other commonly reported primary tumor sites include: right atriums, skin/subcutis, liver. Hemangiosarcoma is the most common splenic neoplasm but it is by no means the only differential for splenomegaly or splenic masses in dogs. 

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A 33.7 kg, 10 year-old neutered male mixed breed presented to his local emergency service for acute onset of anorexia, restlessness and mild dyspnea. At presentation, he had evidence of abdominal fluid and CBC/chemistry panel revealed hypocalemia of 7.2 (reference range 9-12.2 mg/dL) and hypoproteinemia of 4.7 (reference range 5.5-7.6 g/dL). Ultrasonographic examination of his abdomen and thorax revealed a 6.9 x 5.2 cm solid mass along the right cranial aspect of the heart along with a moderate amount of free fluid in the pleural space (see figure 1). The dog was prescribed Lasix 40 mg twice a day after abdominocentesis was performed. Thoracocentesis was not performed. Given the solid nature of the mass and the location at the heart base, a presumptive diagnosis of a chemodectoma was made. Other differentials in this case were hemangiosarcoma, thyroid tumor, lymphoma or hemangiosarcoma. Because of the proximity of the mass to normal heart and lung tissue, the recommendation was made for stereotactic radiation therapy.

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Cytology Case Report- Eastern Vetpath
An eight-year-old neutered male retriever mix dog diagnosed with osteosarcoma of the mid-left ulna in February of 2016, had a partial mid-ulnectomy with clean margins and had been doing well. No adjuvant chemotherapy or radiation therapy were administered post-operatively. Four months after the mid-ulnectomy, a small growth on the lateral aspect of left forelimb was noted and had been getting larger. Radiographs (see below) show a mass (approximately 2×2 cm) in the soft tissues where the partial ulnectomy was performed. The mass was nonpainful and firm. A fine needle aspirate of the mass was obtained and submitted for cytologic evaluation.

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New cell therapies target diseases of old age in pets
Little Jonah once radiated pain. The 12-year-old Maltese dog's body was curled and stiff from the effort of walking with damaged knees. But after Kristi Lively, Jonah's veterinary surgeon, enrolled him in a clinical trial of a therapeutic antibody to treat pain, his owner returned to the Village Veterinary Medical Center in Farragut, Tennessee, with tears in her eyes. Her tiny companion trotted easily alongside her. "I got my dog back," she said.

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Dog Apparently Dumped at Newport Beach Recovering After Having 46-Pound Tumor Removed
A golden retriever named Henry was recovering Wednesday after undergoing surgery to remove a 46-pound tumor on his side less than a month after he was found wandering alone on the sand in Newport Beach, apparently after having been dumped.

Henry was discovered at the beach on May 12,  the huge mass on his right side.

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