AUGUST 4TH, 2017

Dear Friends,

Here is the 217TH issue of our weekly gardening newsletter for Houston, the Gulf Coast and beyond. We really appreciate all of our readers hanging in there with us, sharing stories and inspiring us in so many ways. 
 
Thanks so much!
 
This newsletter is a project of The Lazy Gardener, Brenda Beust Smith, John Ferguson and Mark Bowen (John and Mark are with Nature's Way Resources). We also have a great supporting cast of contributing writers and technical specialists who will chime in and tweak away regularly. We would love to keep receiving your input on this newsletter . . . . comments . . . . suggestions . . . . questions. . . .E mail your thoughts to: lazygardenerandfriends@gmail.com. Thanks so much for your interest.
 
Please    or sign yourself up to receive this newsletter by clicking the "Join Our Mailing List" link just below. We will never sell or share our mailing list to protect the privacy of our subscribers.

Enjoy!

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ENJOY THE RAIN BUT PREPARE FOR MORE HOT SUN!

By BRENDA BEUST SMITH
 
WOULDN'T YOU KNOW . . .the very week I decide to focus on how we are now moving into our hottest season, rains would come! Oh, well . . . it's still true our highest temps occur August through early to mid September.
This is a gardening challenge I never "sweat" (pardon the pun). If all else fails, you can always resort to the Lazy Gardener's approach. If a plant can't survive given all our bugs, heat, drought, freezes, floods and my total neglect, obviously God doesn't want it in my garden. More on this later.
Most gardeners have treasured plants they don't want destroyed by heat. Organic mulch is your best friend on so many different levels:
  • Keeps soil cooler in summer (and warmer in winter)
  • Replenishes organic matter in soil so, among other benefits, it holds water more efficiently.
  • Keeps vital microbacterial activity at higher levels than it would be in hotter, drier soils.
  • Helps cut down on weed growth
Don't panic when you see wilted leaves in the evening. Plants wilt on purpose, reducing exposed leaf surface to prevent as much moisture evaporation as possible. If the leaves are back to normal formation in the morning, that's what the plant was probably doing.
Signs the plant is at least starting to suffer from the heat and/or moisture shortages:
  • Leaves still wilted in the morning
  • Scorch spots -- leaves will sunburn
  • Excessive leaf drop, misshapen fruit or flowers, bitter tasting edibles and (of course)
  • It dies
But then, in excessive heat, plants that go dormant in winter may decide a summer dormancy period is in order. This is a very effective self-defense mechanism to help preserve what resources it has left. The silver lining in one of these abnormal dormant periods is when they do come back out in fall, you get unexpected bloom periods. In my yard, this often happens with my pink magnolia. Enjoy.  Can't stop it anyway.

More water may help prevent this, of course. But too often the way we water is more damaging than helpful:
  • Worst possible method: a hand-held hose in the still-hot evening. When you only wet upper soil layers, roots tend to grow upward. Sun comes out; these layers bake along with the roots growing in them.
  • If that's all you have time to do, at least lay the hose down and let water run very slowly so it goes down and not out sideways. The next day, or an hour later, move it to another plant.
  • Overhead sprinklers used during the day when temps are high (even late into evening) lose easily 50% or more moisture to evaporation - useless to plants; waste of a valuable resource.
  • Excessive watering in one area  forces valuable oxygen out of the soil. Plants may suffer not only from heat, but also from oxygen deprivation.  
Ideal watering systems are buried underground and release water very slowly over a prolonged period of time. This way the water has time to be absorbed by lower soil levels encouraging roots to grow downward.

Next best: soaker hoses facing only downward. Water slowly released slowly so it can trickle downward.

How much and how often should you water? Every plant has different demands. In general, better to do a prolonged (1+ hour) slow drip watering once a week than quick waterings every day.

Young plants (e.g. just-set-out fall vegetables) would benefit from an overhead and west-side shade cloth. A west-side trellis covered with a summer hardy vine can also be used to soften rays.

Water container plants with ice cubes. These melt slowly enough for water to trickle down to the bottom. Or, design your own sun plant protectors. I'm not promoting sale of these items below. Just offering ideas that appear to be easy to re-create with whatever materials you have available:
 
   
L to r: Portable lath house, A child's umbrella, Shade Dots (top), and (below) Garden Guards.
At far right above, DON'T DO THIS!  Enclosed clear plastic may work in colder
climates, but here our intense sun will quickly bake whatever's underneath.
Be sure shade materials or designs allow for plenty of air circulation.
 
If all else fails, there's always the Lazy Gardener's approach -- everything in my yard now is at least 10 years old, some dating back four or five decades. This means they've survived all our bugs, heat, drought, freezes, floods and my total neglect. True Lazy Gardener treasures!

So what's healthy & blooming right now here in spite of all above challenges -- especially my total neglect? At this writing, these include:
  • LARGE SHRUB/SMALL TREE: American beautyberry, crape myrtle, hardy hibiscus, Mexican orchid tree (bauhinia), thryallis.
  • MID-SIZE SHRUB: antique roses
  • VINES: coral vine, sweet autumn clematis
  • TALL PERENNIALS: giant green coneflower, butterfly ginger, pineapple ginger, swamp coneflower,
  • LOW PERENNIALS: indigo plant (indigofera), lantana, plumbago (blue & white), shrimp plants
  • VERY LOW GROWER: purple oxalis
  • BULBS: giant white spider lilies (hymenocallis)

Blooming in my yard now: above l to r: lantana, Mexican orchid tree, plumbago, purple oxalis, sweet  
autumn clematis and thryallis. Below, l to r, American beautyberry, coral vine, green coneflower,  
butterfly & pinecone gingers, giant white spider lilies and indigofera  


Wish I could grow the beautiful yellow/orange/red pride of Barbados (below left). It's gorgeous now all over town. It just doesn't like my yard. Sad to say, I have too much of the other three below, l to r, invasive tall Mexican petunia (ruellia), yellow wedelia and our orange native trumpet vine --  all considered weeds by most gardeners. In less challenging days, I clean them out. One of these days they will take over everything!


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TREASURING OUR BUTTERFLIES . . .  & THANKS TO THE POST OFFICE!!!

One of the most wonderful trends I've watched develop over the decades is the proliferation of school habitat gardens. Today, thanks to dedicated teachers and parents who spend countless hours volunteering to keep them going --  children are so much more knowledgeable about nature than we ever were.


A great success story -- in great part encouraged by these children-oriented habitat gardens -- is the nationwide (and beyond) focus on monarch butterflies, now so threatened by urban sprawl and other factors. A fantastic resource is the National Butterfly Center. Log on to: www.nationalbutterflycenter.org.  Become a member (I am), contribute to support it and become aware of the new challenges it's now facing.

This Mission, TX, site is also a GREAT place to get tons of free information on habitats for butterflies. Check out: materials to expand the horizons of school children now involved in wildlife gardens.

By the way:
  • If your school/church/center's Habitat Garden has an upcoming open-to-public event that publicity will help succeed, let me know. Be happy to give you advance coverage!
  • And if you're not yet aware of our area's need for volunteers (adult and young ones) to help with numerous annual Butterfly Counts, check the Butterfly Enthusiasts of Southeast Texas website:  
 
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TIP O' THE TROWEL TO THE U. S. POSTAL SERVICE  for its new Pollinator stamps (and to Kinglsea
von Helms for sharing news of these delightful treats). Featured are monarchs ( Danaus plexippus) and
western honeybees (Apis mellifera) pollinating a variety of native plants. Order online: Pollinator Stamps


Brenda's column in the LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER 
Is based on her 40+ years as the Houston Chronicle's Lazy Gardener 
Email questions, comments to her at lazygardener@sbcglobal.net



 

 
 
 
 
 
JOHN'S CORNER
 
 
MINERALS - The Elements and What They Do

Part 33


51) Antimony (Sb) - Antimony is an element sometimes referred to as a metalloid. It is metallic in appearance (bright and silvery) but brittle, and with more of a crystal structure than other metals.

Antimony is found in igneous rocks at 0.2 ppm, shale's at 1.5 ppm, and limestone at 0.2 ppm. In soil, antimony ranges from 2-10 ppm. Very little antimony is in fresh or seawater.
Adding a little antimony to lead makes it harder and is commonly used in making bullets. The electro-plates used in lead acid batteries in our automobiles use antimony. When antimony is cast, and as it cools, it emits melodic sounds. Unlike most elements, antimony expands as it cools.

Antimony is below and in the same column on the periodic table as arsenic hence, it has similar properties. The most common electrical or valence state of antimony is +3.
In nature, antimony is often found with sulfite minerals like stibnite (Sb2S3) and may substitute for arsenic (As) in other minerals. Over 100 known minerals contain antimony. Antimony is sometimes concentrated in coals, carbonaceous shale, and sewage sludge.
In addition to hardening lead antimony is used in making flame resistant clothing, other fabrics, and even children's toys. It is found in some semi-conductors and other electrical devices.

The composer Mozart is believed to have been killed by antimony poisoning. Mozart ingested a compound of antimony "tartar emetic" (an antimony potassium salt) which doctors prescribed as a hangover cure. Mozart was a heavy drinker.

Antimony in the form of lead antimonate was used as a yellow pigment on ornamental bricks in the Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar's palace.

Antimony often occurs in soluble forms of which some may be complexed by humates which increase its mobility in the soil. Antimony is easily absorbed hence clay sediments may become enriched with this element. Depending on other soil minerals, antimony may be fixed or readily move through the soil profile.

Antimony contamination is becoming a major problem from land applications of sewage sludge and the burning of coal.

In humans, antimony is found in our bones and other tissues. However, antimony does not seem to accumulate in our bodies. Historically antimony compounds have been used to treat several medical problems. Some antimony compounds have been found to cause cancer in rodent studies when breathed. 

Gardening and Landscaping Problems Associated with Antimony (Sb)

Antimony is not considered an essential element for plants; however it is easily absorbed by plants, if present in the soil, in soluble forms.

One study found increased auxin production by rhizobacteria with increased antimony concentration in the soil (Picard and Bosco 2006).

There is no evidence of toxicity to plants unless extremely high levels of antimony are encountered. Most plants have from 1-30 ppm in their tissues. Spinach grown on contaminated soils had 1,130 ppm of antimony.

Sources: coal, sewage sludge, Biosolids compost (compost made from sewage sludge), metal smelters
 
52) Tellurium (Te) - Tellurium is known as a silvery white, semi-metal. Tellurium is in the same column of the periodic table as selenium at the boundary between metals and non-metals and has properties of both.

Tellurium is found in igneous rocks at 0.001 ppm, land plants at 2-25 ppm, and in land animals at 0.02 ppm. Very little tellurium is found in fresh or seawater. Tellurium is rarer on Earth than the universe in general.

Tellurium is used in making rubber, tinting glass and ceramics, electronic devices, and as a catalyst in oil refining. Tellurium is used as an alloying agent as it makes alloys easier to machine and mill. Tellurium is also used to make our Blu-ray players.
Tellurium is found in tumor suppression protein sequences, as it works with selenium to help the body fight cancer, tumors and viruses.

There is no known biological role for tellurium. It is found in human blood at only 6 ppb, in tissue at 15 ppb, and none in our bones. When we ingest tellurium, it is slowly excreted in our urine with some being converted to a obnoxious and volatile dimethyl telluride (Te(CH3)2) which is then expelled in our breath and sweat glands and has a pungent garlic like odor. This odor can last for weeks.

Microorganisms can absorb tellurium and then emit it in a volatile form by methylating it to dimethyl telluride (Te(CH3)2). Tellurium is fixed by organic matter and some coals can have 20-2,000 ppm of tellurium.

Recent studies have found that tellurium compounds have anti-oxidant properties including anti-tumor and chemo protective effects (Zemolin et al. 2013).

Gardening and Landscaping Problems Associated with Tellurium (Te)

Tellurium has no known biological function. New research has found that fungi can incorporate it in place of sulfur and selenium into some of their amino acids.
Plants absorb tellurium easily and the amount in their tissues is related to the amount in the soil. Plants can absorb tellurium from the soil and have been found with levels of 6 ppm, although most plants have far less. Onions and garlic can have 300 ppm and is what give them their strong odor. 

Sources: coal and fly ash from coal, smelters
 
 
53) Iodine (I) -
"As one moves down the Halogen column on the periodic table, the elements mellow a bit, from vicious fluorine (#9) to deadly chlorine (#17) to barely-liquid bromine (#35) - until you reach iodine, an element so comparatively benign that it is used to cure hoof fungus in horses."

Iodine is gray-black substance that is barely solid at room temperatures; however, with a little heat it quickly evaporates (sublimates) into a beautiful violet vapor without going through a liquid phase. This effect is increased in areas of high humidity.

Iodine is released from rocks during weathering, where it is rapidly transported to ocean basins. Most of the iodine in nature (70%), is found in ocean sediments.

Iodine occurs in igneous rocks at 0.5 ppm, shale at 2.3 ppm, sandstone at 1.7 ppm, limestone at 1.2 ppm, and soil at 5 ppm. Very little iodine is found in fresh or seawater as it is readily absorbed into plants and animals. Marine plants can have 30-1,500 ppm, and marine animals 1-150 ppm. Land animals only have 0.43 ppm but iodine is essential to their health. 
Soils average 2.8 ppm of iodine but it varies widely from 0.1-10 ppm. Soils derived from volcanic ash may have 100 ppm of iodine. Iodine binds readily to organic matter hence tend to accumulate on the surface of soils ("O" horizon).

Under anaerobic conditions, iodine is leached out of our soils. Depending on the chemical form of iodine, it may very stable or very mobile in soils and water. The most common electrical or valence state for iodine is -1.

Iodine is used in colorants and inks, many common chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and used as a catalyst in several applications. When I was a boy, a tincture of iodine was used to treat cuts and scrapes.

Iodine is essential for mammals, especially humans. The World Health Organization estimates that 2 Billion people are deficient in iodine, which is over 30% of the world's population.
The most famous health problem caused by a lack of iodine is goiter. Many years ago, we used to get iodine from chewing gum (Iodigum) which was later replaced by iodized salt.
Natural occurring salt has iodine in it, but the common manufactured white or bleached salt (sodium chloride - NaCl) does not, as all the trace minerals have been removed, hence iodine has to be added back. However, only 20% of the brands of "iodized" salt have enough iodine to meet even the minimum daily requirement if you eat salt.

Note: Potassium iodate when stabilized with calcium carbonate as found in sea salt at the end of 8 months only 3.5 % of the iodine was lost.

Iodine is essential for proper brain functioning and intelligence, it is important for the metabolism of fats, and it helps with the assimilation of phosphorous and the utilization of calcium.

The human thyroid gland requires iodine to make hormones like thyroxine andtriiodothyronine which are required for metabolic functioning. Iodine also blocks toxins from accumulating in our thyroid gland.

A deficiency of iodine is associated with the occurrence of many forms of cancers, intellectual impairment, severe mental retardation, growth stunting, apathy, impaired movement, impaired speech, and impaired hearing. Iodine has been shown to help prevent cancer and breast cancer cells to not die unless they have iodine. Iodine deficiencies have been associated with goiter, cretinism, numbness in ones fingers, nervousness, flabby skin, drooling, and childlike behavior.

A lack of iodine can cause cravings for chocolate (particularly in women), weight gain, fatigue, intolerance of cold, and prenatal deficiency leads to brain damage in infants.
Many forms of pollution displace iodine in our bodies or prevent us from absorbing it. Fluoride added to our public water systems prevents the body from absorbing iodine in the thyroid gland. This is another reason to filter fluoride out of our water systems and not use toothpaste or other items with fluoride added. 

Bromine, which is added to flour and bread, also blocks iodine from being absorbed in our bodies. Then we have many synthetic chemicals called xenoestrogens that are used in hand lotions and other personal care products prevent the absorption of iodine. Other chemicals found in air pollution prevent iodine absorption.

Selenium deficiency excavates the effects of iodine deficiency and in humans; we cannot use iodine efficiently if we do not have sufficient copper.

Humans lose a lot of iodine when we sweat and it must be replaced, especially in hot and humid weather (e.g. Houston and Gulf Coast).

Iodine occurs in soils mainly in fixed forms where it is readily absorbed by humic and fresh organic matter. Iodine is also absorbed onto clays and in the lattice of many minerals. Hence, the phytoavailability of iodine is low.

Gardening and Landscaping Problems Associated with Iodine (I)

Historically iodine was not considered essential for plants, however some new studies have found that in small amounts iodine has a stimulating effect on growth. However, how iodine influences plant growth is not fully understood.

Cabbages, onions, and mushrooms raised in good soil can have 10 ppm of iodine. Other foods are codfish, oysters, shrimp, herring, lobster, and sunflower seeds.

The lack of iodine in our food is an example of why we need to grow food organically. Farmers use artificial fertilizers which acidify the soil, then they have to lime the fields to raise the pH where the lime reduces the uptake of iodine by plants. Nitrates also prevent humans from absorbing iodine from our food.

Toxicity issues are rare under normal cond itions, as the soil cannot hold enough soluble iodine to cause a problem. Iodine tends to bind tightly to soils hence the phytoavailability is low and not available to roots and not easily volatized. The few rare cases of toxicity reported were from agricultural fields near coastlines where large amounts of kelp were used as fertilizers. The physical symptoms were chlorosis in the older leaves while the younger leaves became dark green.

Plants more easily absorb soluble forms of iodine, thus marine plants tend to have more iodine than land plants. Marine plants range from 53-8,800 ppm of iodine.
The decomposition of organic matter by bacteria allows soil iodine to become phytoavailable where most of it is in the plants roots. Foliar application of iodine in the form of potassium iodide (KI) has been found to increase the nitrate accumulation in spinach and to increase the vitamin-C content of radishes.

Iodine content of vegetables was found to be lower in summer and higher in winter.
Plants are also capable of absorbing iodine from the atmosphere and can absorb iodine from foliar applications.

Sources: seaweed, saltwater fish emulsion, sewage sludge
 
 


 



 

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LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER
CALENDAR EVENTS & ANNOUNCEMENTS

PLEASE READ BEFORE SUBMITTING AN EVENT TO THIS CALENDAR.   
Events NOT submitted in the EXACT written format below may take two weeks or longer to be reformatted/retyped.
After that point, if your event does not appear, please email us. 
Sorry, no children's programs.
Submit to: lazygardener@sbcglobal.net 
 
IF WE INSPIRE YOU TO ATTEND ANY OF THESE EVENTS, PLEASE TELL SPONSORS YOU HEARD ABOUT IT IN  
T HE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER 

 
 


 

 
WED., AUG. 9: MERCER STUDENT RESEARCH & EDUCATION SYMPOSIUM ENCORE noon-2pm, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free. Register: 713-274-4160.

THURS., AUG. 10: THE GREATER ATLANTA POLLINATOR PARTNERSHIP: A MODE
L OF URBAN POLLINATOR CONSERVATION by JENNY CRUSE SANDERS, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu
 
THURS.,Aug.10: RAINWATER HARVESTING AND WATER CONSERVATION by SKIP RICHTER, 7:30pm, Cherie Flores Garden Pavillon, 1500 Hermann Dr. Houston Rose Society event.  Free.  houstonrose.org

   
THURS., AUG. 10: FALL VEGETABLES, 6:30 pm, Barbara Bush Memorial Library, 6817 Cypresswood Drive Spring. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600
 
SAT., AUG 12:. BEES: LOVE 'EM and RAISE 'EM!  9-11am, AgriLife Extension Office, 9020 Airport Road, Conroe. Montgomery County Master Gardener event. $5. 936-539-7824; mcmga.com

TUES., AUG. 15: FALL VEGETABLES, 6:30pm, Spring Branch Memorial Library, 930 Corbindale. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600

TUE., AUG 15: A HOMEOWNER'S GUIDE TO WEED CONTROL by GALVESTON COUNTY MASTER GARDENER , 6:30-8:00 pm, AgriLife Extension Bldg., Carbide Park, 4102 Main (Hwy 519), La Marque. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-534-3413, aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html

THURS., AUG. 17: FALL VEGETABLES, 6:30pm, Freeman Branch Library, 16616 Diana Lane. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600

SAT., AUG. 19: FALL VEGETABLES, 10am, Maud Smith Marks Library, 1815 Westgreen Blvd. Katy. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600
 
TUES., AUG. 22, HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS OPEN GARDEN DAY AND SEMINAR: FALL VEGETABLES, 9-11:30 am, 3033 Bear Creek Drive. Free. Register: ogd.harrishort@gmail.com

TUES., AUG. 22: GROWING FRUIT TREES IN CONTAINERS, 1pm. The Sugarland Branch Library, 550 Eldridge, Sugarland.  Free.  A Sugarland Garden Club event. beatles11@peoplepc.com, 281-778-5844

SAT., AUG. 26: GARDEN TO VASE - HANDS-ON WORKSHOP, 10am-noon, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. $40. Register: 713-274-4166.
 
THURS., SEP. 6:  SMALL ORNAMENTAL TREES FOR THE HOUSTON AREA by LINDA GAY 10 am , MUD Building, 805 Hidden Canyon Dr, Katy. Free, Nottingham Country Garden Club event.   ncgctx.or g
   
THURS., SEPT. 7: STROLLER STROLLS, 9-10am, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free. Register: 713-274-4160.
 
SAT., SEPT. 9: WILDSCAPES WORKSHOP & NATIVE PLANT SALE, 8am-3:30pm, Houston Community College, 5601 West Loop South. Native Plant Society of Texas-Houston Chapter event. $40 Aug. 26, $50 after. Register: npsot.org/wp/houston/wildscapes-workshop/

SAT., SEPT 9:  SIMPLY SUCCULENTS by PAULA SPLETTER, 9-11am & HERBS by TRICIA BRADBURY, 1-3pm; AgriLife Extension Bldg, Carbide Park, 4102 Main (Hwy 519), La Marque. Galveston County Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-534-3413, aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston

WED., SEPT. 13: THE MERCER SOCIETY'S OPEN GREENHOUSE, 10am-noon, and YOUR GARDEN & CLIMATE CHANGE, noon, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free.

THURS., SEPT. 14: FROM OVER THE TOP TO DOWN UNDER, ADVENTURES IN HORTICULTURE by GEORGE HULL, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu

THURS., SEPT. 14: GARDENING WITH CHILDREN & GRANDCHILDREN, 6:30 pm, Barbara Bush Memorial Library, 6817 Cypresswood Drive Spring. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600
 
THURS,.SEPT. 14: ROSES LOVE COMPANIONS by LINDA B GAY, 7:30pm, Cherie Flores Garden Pavillon, 1500 Hermann Dr. Houston Rose Society event.  Free.  houstonrose.org 
 
SAT., SEPT. 16: GARDENING WITH CHILDREN & GRANDCHILDREN, 10am, Maud Smith Marks Library, 1815 Westgreen
Blvd. Katy. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600
 
SAT., SEPT 16:  A PASSION FOR PLUMERIA by LORETTA OSTEEN, 1-3pm; AgriLife Extension Bldg, Carbide Park, 4102 Main (Hwy 519), La Marque. Galveston County Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-534-3413, aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston

TUES., SEPT. 19: GARDENING WITH CHILDREN & GRANDCHILDREN, 6:30pm, Spring Branch Memorial Library, 930 Corbindale. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. Register: ogd.harrishort@gmail.com
 
THURS., SEPT. 21: GARDENING WITH CHILDREN & GRANDCHILDREN, 6:30pm, Freeman Branch Library, 16616 Diana Lane. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600

THURS., SEPT. 21-24: MASTER COMPOSTER TRAINING, Green Building Resource Center, 1002 Washington Ave. $40. Green Building Resource Center. Register: 832-394-9050; steve.stelzer@houstontx.gov; codegreenhouston.org

SAT., SEPT. 23: UNDER THE MAJESTIC OAKS - 7th ANNUAL LEAGUE CITY GARDEN CLUB GARDEN WALK, 10am-4pm; $15 advance ticket, Nana's Attic, 501 E. Main, League City. leaguecitygardenclub.org; 281-535-0777.

SAT. SEPT 23:  BULB MANIA by DODIE JACKSON, 9-11am & COMPOSTING, TURNING DIRT INTO SOIL & SOIL HEALTH ASSESSMENT by JIM GILLIAM, 1-3pm; AgriLife Extension Bldg, Carbide Park, 4102 Main (Hwy 519), La Marque. Galveston County Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-534-3413, aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston

TUES., SEPT. 26, HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS OPEN GARDEN DAY AND SEMINAR: GARDENING WITH CHILDREN & GRANDCHILDREN, 9-11:30 am, 3033 Bear Creek DrIve. Free. Register: ogd.harrishort@gmail.com
 

SAT., SEPT 30:  FAVORITE FALL VEGETABLES (CRUCIFEROUS & OTHER VEGETABLES) by GENE SPELLER, 1-3pm, AgriLife Extension Bldg, Carbide Park, 4102 Main (Hwy 519), La Marque. Galveston County Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-534-3413, aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston

SAT., OCT. 7: HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENER FALL PLANT SALE, Bear Creek Garden, 3033 Bear Creek Dr. 281-855-5600


SAT.-SUN., OCT. 7-8: SPRING BRANCH AFRICAN VIOLET CLUB ANNUAL FALL SALE, 10-4 Sat., 10-3 Sun. Judson Robinson Jr. Community Center, 2020 Hermann Dr. Free. 281-748-8417, kjwross@yahoo.com 

TUES., OCT. 10: GROWING PLUMERIAS, 7:30pm, Cherie Flores Garden Pavillion, 1500 Hermann Dr. Free. Plumeria Society of America event. theplumeriasociety.org; 281-438-3653

THURS., OCT. 12: MOORE FARMS BOTANICAL GARDEN: A GERMINATING SUCCESS by REBECCA TURK, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu

THURS., OCT. 12: TREES: PLANTING AND CARE (INCLUDES FRUIT TREES), 6:30 pm, Barbara Bush Memorial Library, 6817 Cypresswood Drive Spring. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600

THURS.-SAT., OCT. 12-14: 2017 BULB & PLANT MART. Garden Club of Houston event.

SAT., OCT. 14: GALVESTON COUNTY MASTER GARDENER ANNUAL FALL PLANT SALE, 9 am-1pm. Galveston County Fair Grounds, Jack Brooks Park - Rodeo Arena, Hwy. 6 @ Jack Brooks Rd., Hitchcock.

TUES., OCT. 17: TREES: PLANTING AND CARE (INCLUDES FRUIT TREES), 6:30pm, Spring Branch Memorial Library, 930 Corbindale. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600
 
THURS., OCT. 19: TREES: PLANTING AND CARE (INCLUDES FRUIT TREES), 6:30pm, Freeman Branch Library, 16616 Diana Lane. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600
 
SAT., OCT. 21: TREES: PLANTING AND CARE (INCLUDES FRUIT TREES), 10am, Maud Smith Marks Library, 1815 Westgreen Blvd. Katy. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600
 
TUES., OCT. 24, HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS OPEN GARDEN DAY & SEMINAR: GARDENING WITH CHILDREN & GRANDCHILDREN, 9:00-11:30 am, 3033 Bear Creek DrIve. Free. Register: ogd.harrishort@gmail.com
 
THURS., NOV. 9: MAGNOLIAS: QUEEN OF THE GARDEN by ANDREW BUNTING, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu
 
THURS., DEC. 14: THE YEAR IN REVIEW by DAVID CREECH, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu

If we inspire you to attend any of these, please let them know you heard about it in . . .  
THE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS NEWSLETTER! 
& please patronize our Newsletter & Calendar sponsors below! 
 
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Events NOT submitted in the EXACT written format below may take two weeks or longer
to be reformatted/retyped. After that point, if your event does not appear, please email us.
Sorry, no children's programs. - Submit to: lazygardener@sbcglobal.net 
 
IF WE INSPIRE YOU TO ATTEND ANY OF THESE EVENTS, PLEASE TELL SPONSORS YOU HEARD ABOUT IT IN 
T HE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER 
  
 
 
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                                                ABOUT US



 
BRENDA BEUST SMITH
 
WE KNOW HER BEST AS THE LAZY GARDENER . . . 

. . . but  Brenda  Beust Smith is also:

   * a national award-winning writer & editor
   * a nationally-published writer &  photographer 
   * a national horticultural speaker
   * a former Houston Chronicle reporter
   
When the Chronicle discontinued  Brenda 's 45-year-old Lazy Gardener" print column a couple of years ago, it ranked as the longest-running, continuously-published local newspaper column in the Greater Houston area.

Brenda 's gradual sideways step from Chronicle reporter into gardening writing led first to an 18-year series of when-to-do-what Lazy Gardener Calendars, then to her Lazy Gardener's Guide book and now to her Lazy Gardener's Guide on CD (which retails for $20. However, $5 of every sale is returned to the sponsoring group at her speaking engagements).

A Harris County Master Gardener,  Brenda  has served on the boards of many Greater Houston area horticulture organizations and has hosted local radio and TV shows, most notably a 10+-year Lazy Gardener run on HoustonPBS (Ch. 8) and her call-in "EcoGardening" show on KPFT-FM. 

Brenda recently ended her decades-long stint as Production Manager of the Garden Club of America's BULLETIN magazine. Although still an active horticulture lecturer and broad-based freelance writer,  Brenda's main focus now is   THE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER with John Ferguson and Mark Bowen of Nature's Way Resources.

A native of New Orleans and graduate of St. Agnes Academy and the University of Houston,  Brenda  lives in Aldine and is married to the now retired Aldine High School Coach Bill Smith. They have one son, Blake.

Regarding this newsletter, Brenda is the lead writer, originator of it and the daily inspiration for it. We so appreciate the way she has made gardening such a fun way to celebrate life together for such a long time.
 
 
JOHN FERGUSON
 
John is a native Houstonian and has over 27 years of business experience. He owns Nature's Way Resources, a composting company that specializes in high quality compost, mulch, and soil mixes. He holds a MS degree in Physics and Geology and is a licensed Soil Scientist in Texas. 
 
John has won many awards in horticulture and environmental issues. He represents the composting industry on the Houston-Galveston Area Council for solid waste. His personal garden has been featured in several horticultural books and "Better Homes and Gardens" magazine. His business has been recognized in the Wall Street Journal for the quality and value of their products. He is a member of the Physics Honor Society and many other professional societies.   John is is the co-author of the book Organic Management for the Professional. 
 
For this newsletter, John contributes articles regularly and is responsible for publishing it.
 
 
MARK BOWEN
 
Mark is a native Houstonian, a horticulturist, certified permaculturist and organic specialist with a background in garden design, land restoration and organic project management. He is currently the general manager of Nature's Way Resources. Mark is also the co-author of the book Habitat Gardening for Houston and Southeast Texas, the author of the book Naturalistic Landscaping for the Gulf Coast, co-author of the Bayou Planting Guide and contributing landscape designer for the book Landscaping Homes: Texas. 
 
With respect to this newsletter, Mark serves as a co-editor and periodic article contributor.
 
 
 
PABLO HERNANDEZ
 
Pablo Hernandez is the special projects coordinator for Nature's Way Resources. His realm of responsibilities include: serving as a webmaster, IT support, technical problem solving/troubleshooting, metrics management, quality control, and he is a certified compost facility operator.
 
Pablo helps this newsletter happen from a technical support standpoint. 
 

 
 
COUPON: Nature's Way Resources. 50% OFF Pomegranates & Pears at Nature's Way Resources (expires 8/15/17)
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