JULY 7, 2017

Dear Friends,

Here is the 213TH issue of our weekly gardening newsletter for Houston, the Gulf Coast and beyond. We really appreciate all of our readers hanging in there with us, sharing stories and inspiring us in so many ways. 
 
Thanks so much!
 
This newsletter is a project of The Lazy Gardener, Brenda Beust Smith, John Ferguson and Mark Bowen (John and Mark are with Nature's Way Resources). We also have a great supporting cast of contributing writers and technical specialists who will chime in and tweak away regularly. We would love to keep receiving your input on this newsletter . . . . comments . . . . suggestions . . . . questions. . . .E mail your thoughts to: lazygardenerandfriends@gmail.com. Thanks so much for your interest.
 
Please    or sign yourself up to receive this newsletter by clicking the "Join Our Mailing List" link just below. We will never sell or share our mailing list to protect the privacy of our subscribers.

Enjoy!

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CRAPES, OLEANDERS, BOTTLEBRUSHES,
FALL EDIBLES & PURPLE EVERYWHERE!     


When I am an old woman I shall wear purple / With a red hat that doesn't go. . .
I shall go out in my slippers in the rain / And pick the flowers
in other people's gardens, / . . . But maybe I ought to practise a little now
So people who know me are not too shocked and surprised,
When suddenly I am old and start to wear purple!
--Jenny Joseph, "When I Am an Old Woman I Shall Wear Purple"


By BRENDA BEUST SMITH
 
Once again, readers have come up with far better gardening topics than I do. Two responses to last week's notes on crapes are a good example.
  • HELP SETTLE AN OLEANDER-VS.-CRAPES BET?
Randy Jones lives in Pasadena and daily passes the incredible plantings along 610 as it passes from I-10E to the Ship Channel bridge. It's hard to tell going so fast, he writes, but are these crapes? Or oleanders? He has a bet with a friend. It's hard telling these two apart when they get so big and you're speeding past.
 
First, thanks, Randy, for calling attention to these freeway plantings I consider some of the most gorgeous in our whole area. They so help to alleviate the daily driving grind for so many.

(If you have a favorite freeway planting, send a picture.  I'd love to give a tout to the
Texas Department of Transportation (TXDoT) and its local partners for such plantings.)

 
At first glance, it looks as if Randy's stretch of 610 is mainly oleanders, but if you happen to notice the pale lavender upward pointing branches usually behind the oleanders, those are crape myrtles.

Most mass-planted roadway oleanders and crapes are identical shades of pink, red and white. Oleanders have long, thin leaves are long and thin; crape leaves tend to be more rounded. But that's a difficult distinction to make at 60mph.

Focus on flowers. Leaves surround oleander flowers. Crapes's conical-shaped flower often hide all leaves. Individual crape blooms are too tiny to be seen from a moving car on a freeway even if you tried.

Crapes and oleanders are often interplanted on roadways to achieve more spectacular color. Each will have downtimes which may or may not coincide before another bloom cycle begins. Usually crapes are pruned into tree shapes, to take advantage of their beautiful sculptural bark on smooth angular trunks when leaves fall off in winter. But they can grow into huge oleander-like shrubs, which may or may not be evergreen.


Crape myrtles, left, are often interplanted with oleanders on roadways, center, and can be hard to tell apart at 60mph. Crape flowers, left, almost hide their green foliage, where as foliage usually shows around oleander blooms
  • CORRECTLY-PRUNED CRAPES GREAT FOR ENTRYWAYS
This sculptural aspect, left above, is one reason crapes are so often used at entryways where close-up viewing occurs year-round. A perfect example of fantastic pruning: Ruth Simmons sent in the picture at left below of these gorgeous crapes at the entryway of River Oaks Place, 1201 McDuffie. In the 20 years she's lived there, she's never seen them so beautiful. Not only are the blooms more prolific than normal, she says, they're of exceptionally high quality this year.

 
Ruth Simmons sent in this lovely shot, left, of spectacular crapes at the entrance to River Oaks Place. Center, yes, Mickey, some crapes now do have purple leaves! Right, Woodland's Red bottlebrushes tolerate more cold

  • PURPLE LEAVES . . . TREAT OR PROBLEM
Another crape question came from friend Mickey January. She had seen what she thought was a crape, but it had purple leaves.  Purple's been an "in" color for some time now everything, including flowers and, now especially, in leaves. So yes, Mickey, there are a lot of purple leaf crapes available now. Check them out!
 
  • ARE CRAPES REALLY MORE BEAUTIFUL THIS YEAR? 
Our memories are so short and crapes are always so gorgeous, Mercer Botanic Garden Director Darrin Duling may be right when he says he's not sure they're MORE beautiful this year. But, he muses, crapes did start to bloom "in early April this year, which is very premature." Darrin adds, "If there is a difference, maybe it is because we have had a relatively dry winter and spring which parallels the summer monsoon climate in their native India."

 
*  *  *
 
SPEAKING OF BOTTLEBRUSH DIEBACK ( which we did last week), D arrin will address in greater depth this unusual one-side bottlebrush dieback reported around town in one of his  upcoming "Ask the Gardener" columns for The Tribune.
 
Speaking of these gorgeous plants that were so hard hit by January's deep freeze, Darrin said he's very happy to see  Woodlander's Red (Callistemon citrinus 'Woodlander's Hardy') bottlebrushes available here now.  This new one (pictured at right above) is more cold-hardy than our usually-planted ones, he says.  
 
*  *  *
 
THINK IT'S TOO HOT TO PLANT VEGETABLES NOW? WRONG!
 
Experienced vegetable gardeners are planning & planting for fall harvests. If you're not, better get started NOW! Vegetable gardeners' best friend, Urban Harvest, has a great program coming up for those of you new to this area and our usually-unique edibles planting schedule:

SAT., JULY 22: FALL VEGETABLE GARDENING, 9:30am-noon, Houston Museum of Natural Science, Moran Conference Hall,  5555 Hermann Park Dr. $30. Urban Harvest event. Register: 713-880-5540; urbanharvest.org
 
To get you off to a good start (and speaking of purple!) our Spotlight below is an excerpt from an edible gardening article this area's vegetable guru, Urban Harvest co-founder Dr. Bob Randall's wrote for the Houston Chronicle.

 

 
Brenda's column in the LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER
Is based on her 40+ years as the Houston Chronicle's Lazy Gardener
Email questions, comments to her at lazygardener@sbcglobal.net
 



 
L to r, Early Jersey Wakefield cabbage, Purple Savoy cabbage and purple/violet cauliflowers


JULY & AUGUST IN HOUSTON  
AREA VEGETABLE GARDENS


By DR. BOB RANDALL
Excerpted from  " Planning the Fall Vegetable Garden"
(Houston Chronicle)
 
  By August, warmth-loving quick-growing veggies can go in the ground. Plant bush snap bean seeds, Edamame edible soy seeds, and summer squash seeds. In early August, you can even get a new crop of sweet potatoes if you choose a 90-day variety like Beauregard.
 

As well, there are many kinds of Cabbage family relatives (Brassicas) suitable for August seed planting or September transplanting. I mainly grow heirloom cabbages like Early Jersey Wakefield or some of the beautiful blue - purple Savoy varieties. We can also grow early and later broccolis, and both the gorgeous violet cauliflowers and the ordinary white ones.

Brussels spouts are also possible, especially north of FM1960, but July planting from seed is best. Collards and kales (both European and Siberian) by contrast are very easy, and by far the most nutritious of any vegetable. I especially like the heirloom Green Glaze. All of these, however, need very good soil fertility. Use a balanced organic fertilizer (about 1/2 cup per square foot or more) and re-fertilize especially if you see yellow or reddish leaves. 

 
Brussels sprouts, Siberian kale and Green Glaze collard greens

As with many fall vegetables, the difficult choice is between planting the seeds where they will grow and using transplants. If you plant the seeds, you will need to water daily for a while, and protect them from snails and their kin. I use shears to cut the bottoms off gallon nursery pots and circle the area where three seeds or so are planted. This keeps off birds and most snails, and tells me where to water in the searing heat. Later I cut off all but the best one.

If you grow transplants, you can keep them away from pests easily, but will need to transplant them at some point. It is not at all easy to move plants in September, so the care if anything will increase at that point. If you will be gone in late August, your only option is to try to buy quality transplants in September. Although you will have less variety choice, this option works especially if you find healthy green plants without wiry stems in three-inch wide pots.

Whether you buy or grow transplants, be careful to do the following:
  1. Keep small plastic pots out of direct sun, since they heat up.
  2. Plant late in the day or on a rare rainy day.
  3. Construct light shade over newly planted plants and keep there until the plants are growing well."

*  *  *
FOR MORE HELP, LOG ONTO THE URBAN HARVEST WEBSITE, www.urbanharvest.org, OR ATTEND:

SAT., JULY 22: FALL VEGETABLE GARDENING, 9:30am-noon, Houston Museum of Natural Science,  
Moran Conference Hall,  5555 Hermann Park Dr. $30. Urban Harvest event. Register: 713-880-5540; urbanharvest.org 
 
 
 
 
JOHN'S CORNER

MINERALS - The Elements and What They Do

Part 29






39) Yttrium (Y) - One writer describes Yttrium as a "hippy" element. Yttrium is a silvery metal of group 3 of the periodic table and behaves chemically similarly to the lanthanide group. It is often classified as a rare earth element (even though it is twice as abundant as lead).

Yttrium is found in igneous rocks at 33 ppm, shale at 18 ppm, sandstone at 9 ppm, and limestone at 4.3 ppm. Very little is found in seawater (0.0003 ppm) however in soils it is found at an average of 50 ppm with a range of 2-100 ppm. In marine mammals, it occurs at 0.1-0.2 ppm and land animals at 0.04 ppm. Yttrium is found in mammalian bone, teeth, and liver.

Yttrium has an electrical or oxidation state +3 and never occurs alone in nature. However, it is often found in association with many minerals like oxides, carbonates, silicates, and phosphates.
When yttrium is combined with barium and copper into an oxide (YBa2Cu3O7), it becomes a superconductor of electricity when cooled to very cold temperatures. When yttrium is combined with aluminum and silicates we get garnet crystals which is used to produce powerful lasers and it can also make very hard diamond-like gemstones.

It is used in color television and computer monitors, luminescence and semi-conductor devices. It is used in ceramics and glass manufacturing and is used as a catalyst in the production of some plastics.

Exposure to some yttrium compounds can cause lung disease in humans. Excess yttrium may cause some toxicity issues from enzyme inhibition to indirect effects by binding to cofactors, vitamins, and substrates.  In general, yttrium salts, are considered mildly toxic if they are soluble and non-toxic if they are insoluble.

For years, it was thought that Yttrium had no biological role in humans even though it is found in every living organism (sometimes in high amounts). However, recent research is suggesting that it does play a role.

It has been found that high levels of aluminum suppresses the body's ability to utilize yttrium and boron, and can trigger the suppression of beneficial probiotic organisms.

Yttrium also enhances normal cell growth and doubles the lifespan of laboratory animals. In rodent studies, 14% of the ingested Yttrium can be detected in the newborn mice. Yttrium has been detected in nucleic acids and even human breast milk contains 4 ppm of Yttrium.

A deficiency of yttrium has been linked to several metabolic diseases (Lou Gehrig's, Alzheimer's, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease). In the absence of certain trace elements, DNA will make use of substitutes. One doctor has found that if there is an Yttrium deficiency, which is used at junction of a gene and DNA molecule, without Yttrium, aluminum is used which is a different size atom that results in misalignment of the gene and a genetic mutation due to nutrition.

Gardening and Landscaping Problems Associated with Yttrium (Y)

Most plants have about 0.6 ppm of yttrium. However, many edible plants may have 20-100 ppm with cabbage at the higher end of the range.

The seeds of woody plants can have 700 ppm of yttrium. Nuts are seeds and are some of the healthiest foods we can eat; I wonder if this is a coincidence?

Mosses and lichens tend to accumulate more yttrium (20-100 ppm) than other species, which suggest that a lot of their accumulation is from atmospheric deposition.

Sources: NPK artificial fertilizers at 14 ppm, Phosphorous (P) fertilizers at 114 ppm, sewage sludge 11 ppm, fly ash from burning coal at 44 ppm
 
40) Zirconium (Zr) - Zirconium is a hard silvery metal that is very resistant to corrosion due to an oxide layer that forms. It will burn in air like a few other metals and is unaffected my most acids. Zirconium is the 12th most abundant element in the earth's crust.

Zirconium is found in igneous rocks at 165 ppm, shale at 160 ppm, sandstone at 220 ppm, and limestone at 19 ppm. Fresh and seawater have very little zirconium at less than 1 ppm. Soils average around 300 ppm, marine plants at 20 ppm, and land plants at less than 1 ppm. Due to its low solubility, it does not tend to accumulate in living organisms with land animals at less than 1 ppm, and marine animals 0.1-1.0 ppm.

Zirconium occurs naturally in a combined state with other elements. It is not very soluble hence; we do not know as much about it as other elements in regards to living systems. The most common electrical state is +4 even though others do occur. The most common mineral is zircon (ZrSiO4) which is zirconium silicate.

One of the first uses for zirconium was in the form of zirconium carbonate where it was used to treat poison ivy. The zirconium compound reacted with the irritant urushiol and rendered it inactive.
Several semi-precious gemstones have zirconium as a component (made from zirconium silicate and zirconium oxide). The most famous is the gemstone cubic zirconia that out sparkles diamond.
Zirconium is used in certain types of incendiary cluster bombs due to its burning in air. Zirconium compounds are very hard (8.5 Mohs) which is many times harder than quartz. When zirconium is combined with yttrium, it makes a coating that protects jet engines and turbines from the high temperatures (does not melt until 4,3770C). 

Zirconium is used in many products from televisions to ceramics (ex. ceramic knives). Zirconium oxide (ZrO2) is very hard and often used as an abrasive.

Gardening and Landscaping Problems Associated with Zirconium (Zr)
Zirconium is not considered essential to plants however new research suggests that zirconium participates in several physiological processes (similar to titanium).

Growth of chlorella green algae is stimulated if exposed to trace amounts of zirconium ascorbate. In experiments with fungi (yeast) it was found that zirconium ascorbate or zirconium citrate increased protein synthesis.

Some plants have no measurable zirconium at all. However, the leaves of deciduous trees can have as much as 500 ppm (ex. Ash tree).

Organic acids form decaying organic matter and fungi help zirconium become more available.
Recent research has found zirconium in the nodules produced by nitrogen fixing bacteria. Zirconium tends to accumulate in the roots of some plants. Zirconium in Tomato roots have been found to range from 0.5-7.0 ppm.

In remediation of mine tailings and in some soils mycorrhizal fungi hyphae colonize mostly on zirconium and titanium mineral grains and would not colonize a soil if these minerals were missing.
Zirconium toxicity is extremely rare.

Sources: granite sand, basalt sand, compost made from deciduous leaves,
 
 



IN THE NEWS:

Mom's Across America has just released a new video on the dangers of GMO's and Round-Up and how it hurts our children.

 




 

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 *   *   *
LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER
CALENDAR EVENTS & ANNOUNCEMENTS

PLEASE READ BEFORE SUBMITTING AN EVENT TO THIS CALENDAR.   
Events NOT submitted in the EXACT written format below may take two weeks or longer to be reformatted/retyped.
After that point, if your event does not appear, please email us. 
Sorry, no children's programs.
Submit to: lazygardener@sbcglobal.net 
 
IF WE INSPIRE YOU TO ATTEND ANY OF THESE EVENTS, PLEASE TELL SPONSORS YOU HEARD ABOUT IT IN  
T HE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER 

 
 


 



SAT. JULY 8: CREATE YOUR OWN JUNGLELOW, USING BEAUTIFUL TROPICAL PLANTS THAT CLEANSE YOUR INDOOR SPACE by LINDA GAY, 10am, The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. arborgate.com

SAT., JULY 8: ALL ABOUT GINGERS, 10-11am, Buchanan's Native Plants, 611 E 11th. Free. 713-861-5702;
buchanansplants.com/events 
 
SAT., JULY 8: RAINWATER HARVESTING AND IRRIGATION BY THE HOMEOWNER!  9-11am, AgriLife Extension Office, 9020 Airport Road, Conroe. $5. Montgomery County Master Gardener event. 936-539-7824;mcmga.com
 
SAT., JUL 8: PECKERWOOD GARDEN OPEN DAY, AMAZING SUMMER LANDSCAPE. 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; eventregistration@peckerwoodgarden.org 
 
TUES., JULY 11: GROWING PLUMERIAS, 7:30pm, Cherie Flores Garden P
avillion, 1500 Hermann Dr. Free. Plumeria Society of America event. theplumeriasociety.org; 281-438-3653

WED., JULY 12: EASY EDIBLES, noon-2pm, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free. Register: 713-274-4160.

THURS., JULY 13: A BR IGHT SPOT IN THE HEART OF TYLER by GREG GRANT, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu
 
THURS., JULY 13: HOUSTON ROSE SOCIETY ICE CREAM SOCIAL, 7-9pm, Cherie Flores Garden Pavilion, 1500 Hermann Dr. Free. houstonrose.org

THURS., JULY 13: RAISED BEDS, LOW VOLUME DRIP IRRIGATION & RAIN BARRELS, 6:30pm, Barbara Bush Memorial Library, 6817 Cypresswood Dr, Spring. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600

SAT., JULY 15: GREAT PEPPER EXTRAVAGANZA - PRESENTATION & TASTING, 9am-Noon, AgriLife Extension Bldg., Carbide Park, 4102 Main (Hwy 519), La Marque.  Galveston County Master Gardener event. Free, but pre-register:
galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-534-3413, www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html

SAT., JUL 15: EVENING AT PECKERWOOD, 5pm, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. Register: peckerwoodgarden.org,  979-826-3232; eventregistration@peckerwoodgarden.org

SAT., JULY 15: PATIO, PORCH AND POOL CONTAINER GARDENING by LINDA GAY, 10am, The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. arborgate.com
 
SAT., JULY 15: TEXAS ROSE RUSTLERS ANNUAL MEET, 9am-4pm, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free. Register: texasroserustlers.com

SAT., JUL 15: FRUIT TREES , 9-11am, AgriLife Extension Office, 1402 Band Rd, Rosenberg. $15.  Fort Bend County Master
  fortbend.agrilife.org/gwc/;  281-342-3034; brandy.rader@ag.tamu.edu.

SAT., JULY 15: RAISED BEDS, LOW VOLUME DRIP IRRIGATION & RAIN BARRELS, 10am, Maud Smith Marks Library, 1815 Westgreen Blvd. Katy. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600

SAT., JULY 15: SQUARE FOOT GARDENING, 9:30-11:30am,
University of St. Thomas, Malloy Hall, Rm 014, 3812 Yoakum Blvd.  
$30. Urban Harvest event. Register: 713-880-5540; urbanharvest.org
 
SUN., JULY 16: Ferns of New Caledonia by Adam Black, 2:00pm, Judson Robinson Jr. Community Center, 2020 Hermann Dr.  Free. Texas Gulf Coast Fern Society event.  tgcfernsoc.org 
 
TUES., JULY 18: RAISED BEDS, LOW VOLUME DRIP IRRIGATION & RAIN BARRELS, 6:30pm, Spring Branch Memorial Library, 930 Corbindale. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-560

WED., JULY 19: OHBA: ORGANICS AT MERCER, 5:30pm-8pm, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. $15. Register: ohbaonline.org 
 
THURS., JULY 20: RAISED BEDS, LOW VOLUME DRIP IRRIGATION & RAIN BARRELS, 6:30pm, Freeman Branch Library, 16616 Diana Lane. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600

THURS., JULY 20: "FEDERALLY-PETITIONED PLANT SPECIES OF TEXAS - STATUS OF OUR ENDANGERED SPECIES", by ANNA W. STRONG, 6:45pm, Houston Arboretum, 4502 Woodway Dr. Free. Native Plant Society of Texas - Houston Chapter event. npsot.org/houston

SAT., JULY 22: GINGERS IN YOUR GARDEN, 10am-noon, Mercer Botanic GardeN, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. $40. Register: 713-274-4166.
 
SAT., JULY 22: PLUMERIA SOCIETY OF AMERICA SHOW & SALE, 9:30am-3pm, Fort Bend County Fairgrounds, 4310 TX-36,
theplumeriasociety.org;  281-438-3653, Rosenberg. Free.

SAT., JUL 22: PECKERWOOD GARDEN DAY, 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; eventregistration@peckerwoodgarden.org
 
SAT., JULY 22: FALL VEGETABLE GARDENING, 9:30am-noon, Houston Museum of Natural Science, Moran Conference Hall, 5555 Hermann Park Dr. $30. Urban Harvest event. Register: 713-880-5540; urbanharvest.org
 
TUES., JULY 25, HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS OPEN GARDEN DAY AND SEMINAR: LOW VOLUME DRIP IRRIGATION & RAIN BARRELS, 9:00-11:30 am, 3033 Bear Creek Drive. Free. Register: ogd.harrishort@gmail.com

TUE., AUG 1: GARDENING BY THE SQUARE FOOT by GALVESTON COUNTY MASTER GARDENER, 6:30-8pm, AgriLife Extension Bldg., Carbide Park, 4102 Main (Hwy 519), La Marque. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-534-3413, aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html

WED., AUG. 2: MERCER STUDENT RESEARCH & EDUCATION SYMPOSIUM, 5:30 pm-8pm, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free. Register: 713-274-4160.
 
THURS., AUG. 3: STROLLER STROLLS, 9-10am, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free. Register: 713-274-4160.
 
FRI., AUG. 4: PROJECT LEARNING TREE, 9am-4pm, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free. Register: plttexas.org
 
WED., AUG. 9: MERCER STUDENT RESEARCH & EDUCATION SYMPOSIUM ENCORE noon-2pm, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free. Register: 713-274-4160.

THURS., AUG. 10: THE GREATER ATLANTA POLLINATOR PARTNERSHIP: A MODEL OF URBAN POLLINATOR CONSERVATION by JE
NNY CRUSE SANDERS, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu
 
THURS., AUG. 10: FALL VEGETABLES, 6:30 pm, Barbara Bush Memorial Library, 6817 Cypresswood Drive Spring. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600
 
TUES., AUG. 15: FALL VEGETABLES, 6:30pm, Spring Branch Memorial Library, 930 Corbindale. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600
 
TUE., AUG 15: A HOMEOWNER'S GUIDE TO WEED CONTROL by GALVESTON COUNTY MASTER GARDENER , 6:30-8:00 pm, AgriLife Extension Bldg., Carbide Park, 4102 Main (Hwy 519), La Marque. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-534-3413, aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html 
 
THURS., AUG. 17: FALL VEGETABLES, 6:30pm, Freeman Branch Library, 16616 Diana Lane. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600

SAT., AUG. 19: FALL VEGETABLES, 10am, Maud Smith Marks Library, 1815 Westgreen Blvd. Katy. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600
 
TUES., AUG. 22, HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS OPEN GARDEN DAY AND SEMINAR: FALL VEGETABLES, 9:00-11:30 am, 3033 Bear Creek Drive. Free. Register: ogd.harrishort@gmail.com

TUES., AUG. 22: GROWING FRUIT TREES IN CONTAINERS, 1pm. The Sugarland Branch Library, 550 Eldridge, Sugarland.  Free.  A Sugarland Garden Club event. beatles11@peoplepc.com, 281-778-5844

SAT., AUG. 26: GARDEN TO VASE, 10am-noon, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. $40. Register: 713-274-4166.
 
THURS., SEPT. 7: STROLLER STROLLS, 9-10am, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free. Register: 713-274-4160.
 
WED., SEPT. 13: THE MERCER SOCIETY'S OPEN GREENHOUSE, 10am-noon, and YOUR GARDEN & CLIMATE CHANGE, noon, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free.

THURS., SEPT. 14: FROM OVER THE TOP TO DOWN UNDER, ADVENTURES IN HORTICULTURE by GEORGE HULL, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu

THURS., SEPT. 14: GARDENING WITH CHILDREN & GRANDCHILDREN, 6:30 pm, Barbara Bush Memorial Library, 6817 Cypresswood Drive Spring. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600
 
SAT., SEPT. 16: GARDENING WITH CHILDREN & GRANDCHILDREN, 10am, Maud Smith Marks Library, 1815 Westgreen Blvd. Katy. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600
 
TUES., SEPT. 19: GARDENING WITH CHILDREN & GRANDCHILDREN, 6:30pm, Spring Branch Memorial Library, 930 Corbindale. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. Register: ogd.harrishort@gmail.com
 
THURS., SEPT. 21: GARDENING WITH CHILDREN & GRANDCHILDREN, 6:30pm, Freeman Branch Library, 16616 Diana Lane. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600

THURS., SEPT. 21-24: MASTER COMPOSTER TRAINING, Green Building Resource Center, 1002 Washington Ave. $40. Green Building Resource Center. Register: 832-394-9050; steve.stelzer@houstontx.gov; codegreenhouston.org

TUES., SEPT. 26, HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS OPEN GARDEN DAY AND SEMINAR: GARDENING WITH CHILDREN & GRANDCHILDREN, 9-11:30 am, 3033 Bear Creek DrIve. Free. Register: ogd.harrishort@gmail.com  

SAT., OCT. 7: HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENER FALL PLANT SALE, Bear Creek Garden, 3033 Bear Creek Dr. 281-855-5600


SAT.-SUN., OCT. 7-8: SPRING BRANCH AFRICAN VIOLET CLUB ANNUAL FALL SALE, 10-4 Sat., 10-3 Sun. Judson Robinson Jr. Community Center, 2020 Hermann Dr. Free. 281-748-8417, kjwross@yahoo.com 

TUES., OCT. 10: GROWING PLUMERIAS, 7:30pm, Cherie Flores Garden Pavillion, 1500 Hermann Dr. Free. Plumeria Society of America event. theplumeriasociety.org; 281-438-3653


THURS., OCT. 12: MOORE FARMS BOTANICAL GARDEN: A GERMINATING SUCCESS by REBECCA TURK, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu

THURS.-SAT., OCT. 12-14: 2017 BULB & PLANT MART. Garden Club of Houston event.

THURS., OCT. 12: TREES: PLANTING AND CARE (INCLUDES FRUIT TREES), 6:30 pm, Barbara Bush Memorial Library, 6817 Cypresswood Drive Spring. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600

SAT., OCT. 14: GALVESTON COUNTY MASTER GARDENER ANNUAL FALL PLANT SALE, 9 am-1pm. Galveston County Fair Grounds, Jack Brooks Park - Rodeo Arena, Hwy. 6 @ Jack Brooks Rd., Hitchcock.

TUES., OCT. 17: TREES: PLANTING AND CARE (INCLUDES FRUIT TREES), 6:30pm, Spring Branch Memorial Library, 930 Corbindale. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600
 
THURS., OCT. 19: TREES: PLANTING AND CARE (INCLUDES FRUIT TREES), 6:30pm, Freeman Branch Library, 16616 Diana Lane. Harris County Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600
 
SAT., OCT. 21: TREES: PLANTING AND CARE (INCLUDES FRUIT TREES), 10am, Maud Smith Marks Library, 1815 Westgreen Blvd. Katy. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600
 
TUES., OCT. 24, HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS OPEN GARDEN DAY & SEMINAR: GARDENING WITH CHILDREN & GRANDCHILDREN, 9:00-11:30 am, 3033 Bear Creek DrIve. Free. Register: ogd.harrishort@gmail.com
 
THURS., NOV. 9: MAGNOLIAS: QUEEN OF THE GARDEN by ANDREW BUNTING, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu
 
THURS., DEC. 14: THE YEAR IN REVIEW by DAVID CREECH, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu

If we inspire you to attend any of these, please let them know you heard about it in . . .  
THE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS NEWSLETTER! 
& please patronize our Newsletter & Calendar sponsors below! 
 
PLEASE READ BEFORE
SUBMITTING AN EVENT FOR THIS CALENDAR. 
Events NOT submitted in the EXACT written format below may take two weeks or longer
to be reformatted/retyped. After that point, if your event does not appear, please email us.
Sorry, no children's programs. - Submit to: lazygardener@sbcglobal.net 
 
IF WE INSPIRE YOU TO ATTEND ANY OF THESE EVENTS, PLEASE TELL SPONSORS YOU HEARD ABOUT IT IN 
T HE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER 
  
 
 
THIS NEWSLETTER IS MADE
POSSIBLE BY THE FOLLOWING SPONSORS











                                             


                                                ABOUT US



 
BRENDA BEUST SMITH
 
WE KNOW HER BEST AS THE LAZY GARDENER . . . 

. . . but  Brenda  Beust Smith is also:

   * a national award-winning writer & editor
   * a nationally-published writer &  photographer 
   * a national horticultural speaker
   * a former Houston Chronicle reporter
   
When the Chronicle discontinued  Brenda 's 45-year-old Lazy Gardener" print column a couple of years ago, it ranked as the longest-running, continuously-published local newspaper column in the Greater Houston area.

Brenda 's gradual sideways step from Chronicle reporter into gardening writing led first to an 18-year series of when-to-do-what Lazy Gardener Calendars, then to her Lazy Gardener's Guide book and now to her Lazy Gardener's Guide on CD (which retails for $20. However, $5 of every sale is returned to the sponsoring group at her speaking engagements).

A Harris County Master Gardener,  Brenda  has served on the boards of many Greater Houston area horticulture organizations and has hosted local radio and TV shows, most notably a 10+-year Lazy Gardener run on HoustonPBS (Ch. 8) and her call-in "EcoGardening" show on KPFT-FM. 

Brenda recently ended her decades-long stint as Production Manager of the Garden Club of America's BULLETIN magazine. Although still an active horticulture lecturer and broad-based freelance writer,  Brenda's main focus now is   THE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER with John Ferguson and Mark Bowen of Nature's Way Resources.

A native of New Orleans and graduate of St. Agnes Academy and the University of Houston,  Brenda  lives in Aldine and is married to the now retired Aldine High School Coach Bill Smith. They have one son, Blake.

Regarding this newsletter, Brenda is the lead writer, originator of it and the daily inspiration for it. We so appreciate the way she has made gardening such a fun way to celebrate life together for such a long time.
 
 
JOHN FERGUSON
 
John is a native Houstonian and has over 27 years of business experience. He owns Nature's Way Resources, a composting company that specializes in high quality compost, mulch, and soil mixes. He holds a MS degree in Physics and Geology and is a licensed Soil Scientist in Texas. 
 
John has won many awards in horticulture and environmental issues. He represents the composting industry on the Houston-Galveston Area Council for solid waste. His personal garden has been featured in several horticultural books and "Better Homes and Gardens" magazine. His business has been recognized in the Wall Street Journal for the quality and value of their products. He is a member of the Physics Honor Society and many other professional societies.   John is is the co-author of the book Organic Management for the Professional. 
 
For this newsletter, John contributes articles regularly and is responsible for publishing it.
 
 
MARK BOWEN
 
Mark is a native Houstonian, a horticulturist, certified permaculturist and organic specialist with a background in garden design, land restoration and organic project management. He is currently the general manager of Nature's Way Resources. Mark is also the co-author of the book Habitat Gardening for Houston and Southeast Texas, the author of the book Naturalistic Landscaping for the Gulf Coast, co-author of the Bayou Planting Guide and contributing landscape designer for the book Landscaping Homes: Texas. 
 
With respect to this newsletter, Mark serves as a co-editor and periodic article contributor.
 
 
 
PABLO HERNANDEZ
 
Pablo Hernandez is the special projects coordinator for Nature's Way Resources. His realm of responsibilities include: serving as a webmaster, IT support, technical problem solving/troubleshooting, metrics management, quality control, and he is a certified compost facility operator.
 
Pablo helps this newsletter happen from a technical support standpoint. 
 

 
 
COUPON: Nature's Way Resources. 50% OFF Pomegranates & Pears at Nature's Way Resources (expires 7/15/17)
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