MARCH 17, 2017

Dear Friends,

Here is the 197th issue of our weekly gardening newsletter for Houston, the Gulf Coast and beyond. We really appreciate all of our readers hanging in there with us, sharing stories and inspiring us in so many ways. 
 
Thanks so much!
 
This newsletter is a project of The Lazy Gardener, Brenda Beust Smith, John Ferguson and Mark Bowen (John and Mark are with Nature's Way Resources). We also have a great supporting cast of contributing writers and technical specialists who will chime in and tweak away regularly. We would love to keep receiving your input on this newsletter . . . . comments . . . . suggestions . . . . questions. . . .E mail your thoughts to: lazygardenerandfriends@gmail.com. Thanks so much for your interest.
 
Please    or sign yourself up to receive this newsletter by clicking the "Join Our Mailing List" link just below. We will never sell or share our mailing list to protect the privacy of our subscribers.

Enjoy!

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OUR VIEWS OF GARDENS EXPANDING
AS WORLD-REACH SHRINKS


        "China and the USA share similar climactic zones and the same kind of challenges . . .  
             . . .  "Let's not forget that China is home to many genera popular in the USA market" 
                                                                                  -- Dr. David Creech

By BRENDA BEUST SMITH
 
Too often we become so focused on our own home landscapes, we ignore what's happening horticulturally throughout the city, state, country, especially, the rest of the world. But . . .that's changing. 

In a recent Texas A&M "Green Trends"™ e-newsletter, renowned U of Georgia professor of horticulture Allan Armitage notes, "the thrill of new plants is fading."  Now our horizons are expanding exponentially. 

I've certainly watched this happen here in our Upper Texas Gulf Coast subtropical pocket. When I started garden writing back in the '70s, most of our plants were hybridized not with us in mind, but for gardeners from the middle of the country. Plants sold here came primarily from California & Florida for two reasons:
  1. The nation's middle tier of gardeners had the longest growing season (translation: $$$). Our growing season was too long. Further north: too short. Middle tier represented the highest profit margins.
  2. We started gardening in February. Still do. We only buy plants with flowers on them in the nurseries. Still do. But back then, where did nurseries get plants with flowers on them in January? California & Florida.
Main problem: all our insects + plants not hardy enough to repel them. We led the nation in horticultural chemical use. Eventually our growing population and changing attitudes made it profitable for local growers to develop & market more ecologically-friendly varieties, especially natives.

Gardeners increasing sophistication is reflected in our readers' responses to this newsletter. Always before, my Chronicle columns were aimed at novice gardeners. Now I'm lucky enough to work with two guys (John Ferguson & Mark Bowen) who agree: our readers are well-informed gardeners, who already know . . .  
  • which plants do best here
  • how to make them self-sufficient through proper planting is this subtropical area
Now a steadily increasing number of gardeners want landscapes that proclaim their deep appreciation for natives and wildlife, as well as focuses on specific functions such as limited space and healthy eating. Decorative plants must also be pollinators, attract and entertain children as well as repel unwanted invaders (deer & rabbits).  
 
Borders are becoming increasingly irrelevant. Kids in school are tracking butterflies & birds from Canada to Mexico. So many of locally super-hardy plants are coming up from even further South rather than down from the north as they usually have before, as well as from points far away who share our growing conditions. I had one email from a lady who wanted to know when to plant okra. She was in Sydney, Australia. She had googled "subtropical planting time okra" and one of my columns popped up!

Our own beautiful baldcypress trees are now being used to combat pollution in China. Former Houston garden writer Mike Peters, now with China Daily, has written extensive about Dr. David Creech's work in China with these and with blueberries, another favorite exchange plant. Dr. Creech, below right, directs the SFA Gardens at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches ( a mere 2+ hours NE of Houston).     


 
Work by Dr. David Creech, right, at SFA Gardens led to the first crops of Golden Kiwi
fruit,
Actinidia chinensis , with heat tolerance and better adaptation to Texas.
Center, Texas baldcypress trees are now being grown in China to help control pollution
 
Now Dr. Creech is heading back to China for the 19th International Botanical Congress (IBC 2017). This global gathering in July will, Dr. Creech says, benefit all of us, as he details in our Spotlight article below.

It's difficult, if not impossible, to accurately describe what an impact Dr. Creech and his staff have had on our home gardens.  So many of our favorite and now-hardiest flowers and shrubs are the result of hybridization and/or promotion through SFA's Mast Arboretum, the 8-acre Ruby M. Mize Azalea Garden, the 42-acre Pineywoods Native Plant Center and SFA's 68-acre Recreational Trail & Gardens.

And, speaking of global awareness, Happy St. Patrick's Day! (which also happens to be my late grandmother, Estelle Beust's birthday! Miss you, Nana!) 

But before we get a China preview from Dr. Creech, boy, hasn't it been . . .
 

*  *  * 
  
. . .  GREAT SPRING FOR AMARYLLIS!

These so-easy-for-us bulbs are absolutely spectacular in area gardens! So maybe reader Marion Nojek shouldn't have been so surprised when this gorgeous spider amaryllis (left above) suddenly appeared in her garden. She didn't plant it. No idea where it came from, she wrote when she sent in this photo.

What a treat! This surprise visitor is probably a "true" South African amaryllis. "True amaryllis" have more slender, delicate stems with smaller, more delicate flowers than the more common, familiar large trumpet-flowered amaryllis (right). Now, however, these Central/South America natives are officially classified as "Hippeastrums."  
 
But don't sweat it. They'll both always be "amaryllis" to most of us.  Far more interesting is their ubiquitous familiar name's origin. Amaryllis was the love-struck maiden in Virgil's epic "Eclogues." She stabbed her heart with a golden arrow, then daily visited the cottage of handsome, cold-hearted Alteo, shedding drops of blood along the way. On the 30th day, beautiful scarlet flowers sprouted from her red drops. Alteo fell in love with her and henceforth "amaryllis" came to mean pure pastoral beauty. 

Amaryllis love us so much. In colder climes, they have to be lifted and saved during winter. Here they just lie low until cold spells speed past.  Couple of amaryllis cultural notes:
  • Don't remove spent foliage after flowers fade. Let it die back naturally. Amaryllis (and other bulbs) use fading foliage to replenish the bulb for future blooms. With amaryllis in particular, the bulbs store nutrients for two year's worth of flowers.
  • If amaryllis quit blooming, chances are they either
             1. suffered some sort of nutrient loss one or two years previously or  
             2. the bulbs have sunk too deep (usually the reason in this area).  
 
The full "neck" of the bulb should be above ground. After bulbs bloom out, dig them up disturbing the roots as little as possible, fill in underneath with good soil and gently replace the roots and bulb.  
 
P.S. Potted amaryllis can go in the ground anytime, or can be left in pots to rebloom.  
 
Now . . . more on China!

 
SENDING IN EVENT NOTICES?  
FIRST, PLEASE CHECK OUT THE CALENDAR BELOW.    
Events NOT submitted in our exact format (it never changes!) will take far longer to be added to the calendar. 
Make sure whoever sends in your notices sees this info. Thanks. Brenda

  *Brenda's column in the free, emailed LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER   
is based on her 45+ years as the Houston Chronicle's Lazy Gardener. To sign up: CLICK HERE

*  *  *  
 
 I    
"The research environment in China is different . . .   Instead of facing massive 
cuts in ... funding, the reverse is true ... So, how does this benefit Texas?" 

THE CHINA CONNECTION 
 
by DR. DAVID CREECH
Stephen A. Austin State

I've been wandering around China since 1997 as part of several collaborative projects with the Nanjing Botanical Garden.  I've been asked many times why are you going to China all the time?  Well, that's easy. Most of my work in China puts a focus on  Taxodium (Baldcypress) breeding and improvement with Professor Yin Yunlong and his team and the development of a blueberry industry in China with Professor Yu Hong and her team.

This July I head to Shenzhen for the International Botanical Congress where I moderate a session and present a paper on our salt tolerance research at our Moody Gardens research plot. Just the opportunity to connect with so many scientists across a wide range of Horticulture makes it all worthwhile.  

Hibiscus syriacus , center, can be grafted on Hibiscus hamabo, left, to increase saltwater tolerance.
Right,
Cornus wilsoniana is a Chinese dogwood with beautiful bark and large flowers 
 
The research environment in China is different.  Instead of facing massive cuts in both state and national funding, the reverse is true.  It's no secret that China is investing heavily in science at both the provincial and central government level.  There are new buildings everywhere.  The labs are packed with very high tech instrumentation.  There are PhD's under every rock and research teams are tackling exciting new challenges at every turn.  Let's face it; any casual stroll through the science journals of the world reveals that China has upped their game. 

The IBC2017 conference ( http://www.ibc2017.cn/) features a global list of participants who lead their respective fields, whether it's genomic work, plant physiology or dealing with climate change impacts on botanical diversity, this conference has it all.  I've attended conferences before in China and let's just say they're dramatic.

I don't think anyone will argue that most science conferences in the USA are a bit bland. It's speaker after speaker, up for the requisite 15 to 20 minutes to present their research.  Sure, there's great value in co-mingling with like-minded researchers and developing that important social/professional network, but science conferences in the USA are not all that exciting. 

The top conferences in China are the opposite and include elaborate banquets with outrageous entertainment and plenty of toasting.  The pre and post conference tours are to die for. It's something to look forward to.

So, how does this benefit Texas?  Well, there's a wealth of plant materials.  Even though it's harder than ever to move Chinese plant material into the USA, it can be done with the proper permitting and protocols. The introduction of bald cypress hybrids (Montezuma cypress X Bald cypress) with alkalinity and salt tolerance, no knees and a fast growth rate is surely a good thing. 

Even though this a native-to-the-USA woody, it's China that has implemented controlled crosses and selection from massive seedling fields.  Let's not forget that China is home to many genera popular in the USA market.       
 
My latest excitement is Cornus wilsoniana, a really cool Chinese dogwood with beautiful bark and large flowers.  Learning that  Hibiscus syriacus can be grafted on  H. hamabo means that the popular Althaea may be grown in environs with saltier soils is possibly a breakthrough Texas coastal residents.  
 
Our work at SFA Gardens has led to the first crops of Golden Kiwifruit,  Actinidia chinensis, and a China connection, after two years of USDA quarantine, promises seven new varieties with heat tolerance and better adaptation to Texas.

China and the USA share similar climactic zones and the same kind of challenges.  By working together we can both plan and plant for a better world!

* Dr. David Creech can be contacted at: dcreech@sfasu.edu or through his "Life on the Green Side" blog 
* A great opportunity to visit the SFA Gardens (& hopefully meet Dr. Creech) will be at the 2017 Reeves Lecture Series every 2nd Thurs, 7pm, at Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St., Nacogdoches:   Apr 13: Steven Chamblee/Chandor Gardens, "Great Garden Ideas"; May 11: Brie Arthur, Media Star,"The Foodscape Revolution"; June 8: Dennis Werner/North Carolina State University - "Is Redbud the next crapemyrtle?"; July 13: Greg Grant, Smith County Horticulturist - "A Bright Spot in the Heart of Tyler - The Idea Garden";  Aug 10: Jenny Cruse Sanders /Atlanta Botanical Garden, "The Greater Atlanta Pollinator Partnership";  Sept 14: George Hull, Portland Horticulturist - "From Over the Top to Down Under, Adventures in Horticulture"; Oct 12: Rebecca Turk/Moore Botanical Gardens - "Moore Farms Botanical Garden: A Germinating Success"; Nov 9: Andrew Bunting/Chicago Botanical Garden - "Magnolias: Queen of the Garden" & Dec 14:Dave Creech - "Year in Review; Surviving Academia With No Permanent Injuries."    
 
 
 
 
JOHN'S CORNER                                                   

MINERALS - The Elements and What They Do
Part 15
 
23) Vanadium (V) - Vanadium is a silvery grey metal and occurs naturally in over 70 minerals and is essential for all living organisms. Vanadium is found in igneous rocks at 135 ppm, shale at 130 ppm, both sandstone and limestone at 20 ppm, fresh and seawater at 0.001 ppm and soils at 100 ppm. It is found in land and marine plants at 1.6 ppm and 2 ppm respectively.
 
This metal is used in industry as a few percent vanadium carbide makes steel harder and stronger than even titanium steel. The green color in many emeralds comes from vanadium impurities in the gemstone.
Vanadium was found to be an essential trace element in 1971, however it is poorly absorbed by humans when in its metallic state with only 0.1-1% of what is there being absorbed. As in many nutrients if the mineral form of vanadium is chelated then absorbability can reach 40%, and if in is in plant derived colloids up to 98% absorption can be achieved. As in most nutrients, we must get them in a plant-derived form to ensure we have sufficient amounts for good health.
 
Vanadium stimulates glucose oxidation and transport in fat cells, along with glycogen synthesis in the liver and muscles. Vanadium enhances the stimulating effect of insulin on DNA synthesis. It appears to function like insulin by alternating cell membrane function, hence vanadium has a very beneficial effect for humans with glucose tolerance problems. Vanadium supplementation can have a major effect in reducing or eliminating most cases of adult onset diabetes.
 
Vanadium inhibits cholesterol synthesis in animals and humans and vanadium has known anti-carcinogenic properties. A few vanadium deficiency diseases are slow growth, increased infant mortality, infertility, elevated cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, hypoglycemia, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity.
It is an essential component of several human enzymes and vanadium supplements has shown a growth promoting effect on chickens.
 
Often our cravings for sweets and chocolate are symptoms of a vanadium and chromium (Cr) deficiency. Chocolate often has higher levels of these nutrients.
 
Gardening and Landscaping Problems Associated with Vanadium (V)
 
Many plants absorb vanadium easily from the soil (especially if it is acidic) if it is present in the soil. Vanadium is absorbed and stored in soils by humus (especially in alkaline soils) and by clay minerals to some degree.
Observations have found that the ions of vanadium, vanadate (VO4-3) and vanadyl (VO2+) in various complexes have both stimulating and inhibiting impacts on several plant enzymes.
Vanadium may substitute for molybdenum (Mo) in nitrogen fixation by some microorganisms. Vanadium also accumulates in the nodules on certain legumes.
 
Other plant enzymes use vanadium to convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia to make amino acids. Vanadium is required by some algal and bacteria species for them to grow.
 
Spinach (500-800 ppm) and lettuce (280-710 ppm) tend to accumulate more vanadium than other plants.
One study found that vanadium levels over 3,000 ppm (very rare), might have some inhibitory effects on some plants.

Sources: granite sand, basalt sand


"REAL FOOD FAKE FOOD- Why You Don't Know What You are Eating & What You Can Do About It", Larry Olmstead, Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 2016, ISBN: 978-1-61620-421-1

The government agency called the FDA is often referred to as Failure Deception and Abuse, this book is another example of why. Growing fruits and vegetables in our back yards has exploded in recent years and this book is another example of why we need to grow our own food or shop at local farmers markets. Several people have written on the essence of this book so here is what they have to say.

You've seen the headlines: Parmesan cheese made from wood pulp. Lobster rolls containing no lobster at all. Extra-virgin olive oil that isn't. Fake foods are in our supermarkets, our restaurants, and our kitchen cabinets. Award-winning food journalist and travel writer Larry Olmsted exposes this pervasive and dangerous fraud perpetrated on unsuspecting Americans. In Real Food / Fake Food, award-winning journalist Larry Olmsted convinces us why real food matters and empowers consumers to make smarter choices
  
 "Olmsted makes you insanely hungry and steaming mad--a must-read for anyone who cares deeply about the safety of our food and the welfare of our planet." -Steven Raichlen, author of the Barbecue! Bible series

"The world is full of delicious, lovingly crafted foods that embody the terrain, weather, and culture of their origins. Unfortunately, it's also full of brazen impostors. In this entertaining and important book, Olmsted helps us fall in love with the real stuff and steer clear of the fraudsters." -Kirk Kardashian, author of Milk Money: Cash, Cows, and the Death of the American Dairy Farm

Olmsted brings readers into the unregulated food industry, revealing the shocking deception that extends from high-end foods like olive oil, wine, and Kobe beef to everyday staples such as coffee, honey, juice, and cheese. It's a massive bait and switch in which counterfeiting is rampant and in which the consumer ultimately pays the price.

But Olmsted does more than show us what foods to avoid. A bona fide gourmand, he travels to the sources of the real stuff to help us recognize what to look for, eat, and savor: genuine Parmigiano-Reggiano from Italy, fresh-caught grouper from Florida, authentic port from Portugal. Real foods that are grown, raised, produced, and prepared with care by masters of their craft. Part cautionary tale, part culinary crusade, Real Food / Fake Food is addictively readable, mouthwateringly enjoyable, and utterly relevant.
 

 




 *   *   *
LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER
CALENDAR EVENTS & ANNOUNCEMENTS

PLEASE READ BEFORE SUBMITTING AN EVENT TO THIS CALENDAR.   
Events NOT submitted in the EXACT written format below may take two weeks or longer to be reformatted/retyped.
After that point, if your event does not appear, please email us. 
Sorry, no children's programs.
Submit to: lazygardener@sbcglobal.net 
 
IF WE INSPIRE YOU TO ATTEND ANY OF THESE EVENTS, PLEASE TELL SPONSORS YOU HEARD ABOUT IT IN  
T HE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER 
 
FRI., MAR 17: EXPLORING SPICE ISLANDS IN FOOTSTEPS OF DAVID FAIRCHILD by CHAD HUSBY, Ph.D., 7pm, Peckerwood Garden, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org,  979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org

FRI-SAT., MAR. 17-18: MARCH MART Plant Sale, Fri. 10am-4pm, Sat. 8am-4pm, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble.

SAT.. MAR. 18, HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENER PERENNIAL, HERBS & PEPPER SALE, 8am, Plant Overview, 9am-1pm Sale. Campbell Hall, Pasadena Fairgrounds, 7600 Red Bluff Rd., Pasadena.  hcmga.tamu.edu

SAT., MAR. 18: GREAT GULF COAST PLANTS FOR SUN OR SHADE with Linda Gay, Enchanted Forest 10am - 10611 FM 2759, Richmond - 281-937-9449; Enchanted Gardens 2pm - 6420 FM 359, Richmond - 281-341-1206 Free. myenchanted.com
   
SAT., MAR. 18: TOMATO STRESS MANAGEMENT, PART 3 by IRA GERVAIS, 9-11:00 am, & CULTURE & CARE OF PALMS by OJ MILLER, 1-3:00 pm, AgriLife Extension, Carbide Park, 4102-B Main, La Marque. Galveston County Master Gardener events. Free, but pre-register:  galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-534-3413, www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston

SAT. MAR. 18: MONTGOMERY COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS SPRING PLANT SALE, 8am Program; 9am-noon Sale. AgriLife Extension Office, 9020 Airport Road, Conroe.   936-539-7824; w ww.mcmga.com

SAT., MAR. 18: ROSES: PLANTING, GROWING AND UPKEEP, 10am, Maud Smith Marks Library, 1815 Westgreen Blvd. Katy. Free Harris County Master Gardener event. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf   281-855-5600

SAT.-SUN., MAR. 18-19:  DAYLILY SALE, 9am-5pm. Angleton Market Days, Brazoria County Fairgrounds, 901 S. Downing St., Angleton.  Lone Star Daylily Society event.  979-236-1478. lonestardaylilysociety.org

SUN., MAR. 19: ENIGMATIC HORSETAILS: ANCIENT PLANTS IN MODERN WORLD by CHAD HUSBY, 2pm, Judson Robinson Jr. Community Center, 2020 Hermann Dr.  Free. Texas Gulf Coast Fern Society event.  tgcfernsoc.org


MON., MAR. 20, OPEN GARDEN DAY, 8:30 - 11 am, GENOA FRIENDSHIP GARDEN, 1202 Genoa Red Bluff Rd., Houston, TX 77034.  Master Gardeners available to answer your questions.  FREE. https://hcmga.tamu.edu.
 
MON., MAR. 21: EARTH-KIND RESIDENTIAL LANDSCAPING SCHOOL begins (also Mar. 22, 28 & 29), 6-8pm, AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Dr. $40/household. Harris County AgriLife Extension event. Ute.Schaefer@ag.tamu.edu or
713-274-0959 

TUES., MAR. 21: NORTHERN PERU - BROMELIADS of Tabaconas Namballe Sanctuary, Archaeological Sites and Cordillera Negra & Blancaby SCOTT SANDEL, 7:30pm, West Gray Multi-Service Center, 1475 W Gray.  Free. Bromeliad Society / Houston event. bromeliadsocietyhouston.org

TUES., MAR. 21: ROSES: PLANTING, GROWING & UPKEEP, 6:30pm, Spring Branch Memorial Library, 930 Corbindale. Free Harris County Master Gardener event.: hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf ; 281-855-5600

WED. MAR. 22: FAIRY GARDENING-MAGICAL MINIATURE LANDSCAPE by ANGELA CHANDLER, Noon-1pm, The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. Free. arborgate.com

SAT., MAR. 25: JOIN THE PERENNIAL PLANT MOVEMENT, Enchanted Forest 10am - 10611 FM 2759, Richmond - 281-937-9449; Enchanted Gardens 2pm - 6420 FM 359, Richmond - 281-341-1206 Free. myenchanted.com
 
SAT. MAR. 25: GARDENING WITH COLOR-CREATING THE 'WOW' FACTOR by GAYE HAMMOND, 10am, The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. Free. arborgate.com

SAT. MAR 25: HERB TALK with JEANNIE DUNNIHOO, 10am, Nature's Way Resource, 101 Sherbrook cir, Conroe.  Free.  natureswayresources.com
 
SAT., MAR. 25: NATIVE LANDSCAPING CERTIFICATION LEVEL 1 CLASS (Introduction), 8 am-4:30 pm, Armand Bayou Nature Center, 8500 Bay Area Blvd, Pasadena. $37. Native Plant Society of Texas-Houston Chapter; Registration: npsot.org/wp/nlcp; npsot.org/wp/houston/native-landscaping-certification

SAT, MAR 25: TURNING DIRT INTO SOIL by JIM GILLIAM, 1-2:30 pm, AgriLife Extension, Carbide Park, 4102-B Main, La Marque. Galveston County Master Gardener events. Free, but pre-register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-534-3413, www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston
 
THURS. MAR. 30: WOODY TREES AND SHRUBS TO MAKE YOUR NEIGHBORS ENVY YOU by DR. DAVE CREECH, 10am, The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. Free. arborgate.com
 
SAT., MAR 25: PECKERWOOD GARDEN OPEN DAY, 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org

SAT., MAR. 25: GARDEN VILLAS GARDEN CLUB PLANT & GARDEN ACCESSORIES SALE, 9am-1pm, Mt. Carmel Academy, 7155 Ashburn. Free. bburns50@aol.com

SUN., MAR. 26. URBAN HARVEST RESTORING NATURE THROUGH PERMACULTURE classes, noon-5pm. Japhet Creek Community Classroom, 4466 Billy St. $238. Prereqisits: 713-880-5540urbanharvest.org.

TUES.
, MAR. 28, HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS OPEN GARDEN DAY & ROSE SEMINAR\ , 9:-11:30am, 3033 Bear Creek Drive. Free. Register: ogd.harrishort@gmail.com

SAT., APR. 1: COCKRELL BUTTERFLY CENTER SALE, 9am, Houston Museum of Natural Science,  hmns.org

SAT., APR. 1.: WHITE OAK GARDEN SPRING PLANT SALE, 9am program by HEIDI SHEESLEY, 10am-2pm (or till sold out) sale, White Oak Conference Center, 7603 Antoine Dr. nnmd.org

SAT. APR. 1:  MEMORIAL NORTHWEST LADYBUGS GARDEN CLUB PLANT SALE, 9am-2pm, MNW Community Center Parking Lot, 17440 Theiss Mail Route Road, Spring. mnwhoa.org.

SAT. APR 1: EDIBLE POLLINATORS by DAVE & TRISH WHITINGER, 10am, The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. Free. arborgate.com
 
SAT., APR 1: SFA GARDENS PLANT SALE, 9 am - 2 pm, at the Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet Street, Nacogdoches, TX 75962.  Inventory will be posted on the SFA Gardens FB page. 
 
SAT,M APR. 1: Urban Harvest's Warm Weather Gardening. 9:30-11:30am. University of Houston, Central Campus, Charles McElhinney Hall, Rm 106, 3623 Cullen Blvd. $40.  713-880-5540; urbanharvest.org
 
SAT.-SUN., April 1-2:  HOUSTON ORCHID SOCIETY SHOW & SALE, 9am-5pm. Houston Museum of Natural Science Main Lobby, 5555 Hermann Park Drive, Houston. Free. http://www.houstonorchidsociety.org/show.html  

MON., APR. 3-MAY 1: LANDSCAPE FOR LIFE, 9am-noon, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. $150. Register: 713-274-4160.

TUES. APR. 4: WHATS NEW AND UNIQUE IN THE PLANT WORLD by RAND HOPKINS, 10am, The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. Free. arborgate.com

WED., APR. 5, 2017: PLANT SALE, 9am-noon, Clear Lake United Methodist Church, 16635 El Camino Real. Free. Gardeners By The Bay event.  281-474-5051

THURS., APR. 6: STROLLER GARDEN STROLLS, 9-10am, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free. Register: 713-274-4160.

SAT., APR. 8: PLANNING AND PLANTING A HABITAT GARDEN by NANCY GRIEG,- Enchanted Forest 10am - 10611 FM 2759, Richmond - 281-937-9449 - Enchanted Garden 2pm - 6420 FM 359, Richmond 281-341-1206 free. my enchanted.com 
 
SAT. APR. 8: THE ART OF ESPALIER by ANGELA CHANDLER, 10am, The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. Free. arborgate.com

SAT., APR 8: PECKERWOOD GARDEN OPEN DAY, 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org

SAT., APR. 8: NATIVE LANDSCAPING CERTIFICATION LEVEL 3 CLASS (Installing/Maintaining), 8 am-4:30 pm, Kleb Woods Nature Center, 20303 Draper Road, Tomball. $57. Native Plant Society of Texas-Houston Chapter; Register: npsot.org/wp/nlcp; npsot.org/wp/houston/native-landscaping-certification.

WED., APR. 12: GARDENING IN SMALL SPACES, noon-2pm, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free. Register: 713-274-4160.

WED. APR. 12: SOLVING HOUSE PLAN PROBLEMS WTH LANDSCAPING FENG SHUI by KATHERINE ASHBY, Noon-1pm, The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. Free. arborgate.com
 
THURS., APR.13: DELIGHTING IN THE FRAGRANCE OF GARDEN ROSES by MICHAEL SHOUP, 7:30pm, Cherie Flores Garden Pavillon, 1500 Hermann Dr. Houston Rose Society event. Free. houstonrose.org

THUR., APR. 13: SOILS & MULCH by JOHN FERGUSON, 10am, Bayland Community Center, 6400 Bissonnett at Hillcroft. Free. Houston Area Daylily Society event. 281-723-7409


THUR., APR 13:  GRAF TING PECAN TREES by GALVESTON COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS, 2-3 pm, 15102 Williams Street, Santa Fe. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-534-3413, aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston

THURS., APR. 13 GREAT GARDEN IDEAS BY STEVEN CHAMBLEE, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404; sullivanfa@sfasu.edu

THURS., APR. 13: HOW TO TAKE CARE OF YOUR HAND TOOLS by LOUIS MICKLER, 10am, Genoa Friendship Garden, 1202 Genoa Red Bluf. Free.  hcmga.tamu.edu.
 
 THURS., APR. 13: GREAT GARDEN IDEAS BY STEVEN CHAMBLEE, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404; sullivanfa@sfasu.edu

FRI., APR 14: "PEACE, LO
VE AND MILAGROS: LIFE LESSONS FROM THE ROAD" by STEVEN CHAMBLEE. 10 am. White Oak Conference Center, 7603 Antoine. Free. Houston Federation of Garden Clubs event. www.houstonfederationgardenclubs.org

SAT. APR. 15: VERTICAL GARDENS MADE EASY...AND AFFORDABLE! by STEVEN CHAMBLEE, 10am, The Arbor Gate,
15635 FM 2920, Tomball. Free. arborgate.com
 
MON., APR. 17: ALL ABOUT MULCHES by JOHN FERGUSON, 2 pm, AgriLife Extension Center, 9020 Airport Rd., Conroe. Free. Montgomery County Master Gardeners. 512-577-2914, mcmga.com/

MON., APR. 17: OPEN GARDEN DAY & PLANT SALE, 8:30-11am, Genoa Friendship Garden, 1202 Genoa Red Bluff Rd., Houston, TX 77034. Master Gardener event. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu.

TUES., APRIL 18: HERBS, 6:30pm, Spring Branch Memorial Library, 930 Corbindale. Free Harris County Master Gardener event.
  hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf    281-855-5600

THURS. APR. 20: VEGETABLES - IS IT TOO LATE? by JEREMY KOLLAUS, 10am, The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. Free. arborgate.com
 
THURS., APR. 20: HERBS, 6:30pm, Freeman Branch Library, 16616 Diana Lane. Free. Harris County Master Gardener event.
 
THURS., APR. 20: HOW TO GROW STONE FRUIT by Herman Auer, 6:30-8pm, AgriLife Extension Center, 3033 Bear Creek Dr. Free. Gulf Coast Fruit Study Group event. 281-855-5600; Ute.Schaefeer@ag.tamu.edu

FRI., APR 21: EVENING AT PECKERWOOD LECTURE SERIES, 7pm, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org,  979-826-3232
; info@peckerwoodgarden.org

SAT., APR. 22: HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENER SPRING PERENNIAL SALE, Bear Creek Garden, 3033 Bear Creek Dr. 281-855-5600


SAT., APR. 22: POOLSIDE CONTAINERS AND IDEAS, Enchanted Forest 10am - 10611 FM 2759, Richmond - 281-937-9449; Enchanted Gardens 2pm - 6420 FM 359, Richmond - 281-341-1206 free. myenchanted.com

SAT. APR. 22: LANDSCAPE DESIGN AND MAINTENANCE MADE EASY by SKIP RICHTER, 10am, The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. Free. arborgate.com
 
SAT., APR. 22: PARTY FOR THE PLANET, 6-10pm, Armand Bayou Nature Center, 8500 Bay Area Blvd. Tickets: abnc.org

SAT., APR 22: PECKERWOOD GARDEN OPEN DAY, 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org

SAT., APR. 22: HERBS, 10am, Maud Smith Marks Library, 1815 Westgreen Blvd. Katy. Free. Harris County Master Gardener event. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600

TUES., APR. 25, HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS OPEN GARDEN DAY & HERB SEMINAR:, 9-11am, 3033 Bear Creek Drive. Free .Harris County Master Gardener event . Register: ogd.harrishort@gmail.com

TUES., APR. 25: BENEFICIALS ON THE GARDEN by DR. WILLIAM M. JOHNSON, 6:30-8 pm, AgriLife Extension, Carbide Park, 4102 Main, La Marque.  Galveston County Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-534-3413, aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston
 
WED., APR. 26: FLOWER POWER by CYNTHIA GRAHAM, RN, BSN, Noon-1pm, The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. Free, arborgate.com

THURS., APR. 27: HERBS, 6:30 pm, Barbara Bush Memorial Library, 6817 Cypresswood Drive Spring. Free Harris County Master Gardener event. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600­­

SAT., APRIL 29: FAIRY GARDEN SEMINARS, 10am, Enchanted Forest, 10611 FM 2759, 281-937-9449; 2pm, Enchanted Gardens, 6420 FM 359, 281-341-1206, both Richmond. $10+. myenchanted.com

SAT. APR. 29: CONTAINER HERB GARDENING by HENRY FLOWERS, 10am, The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. Free. arborgate.com

SAT., APR. 29: SPACE CITY HIBISCUS CHAPTER SHOW & SALE, 1-4pm, East Harris County Activity Center, 340 Spencer Hwy. Pasadena. 

SAT., APR. 29: NATIVE LANDSCAPING CERTIFICATION LEVEL 3 CLASS (Installing and Maintaining Native Landscapes), 8 am-4:30 pm, Kleb Woods Nature Center, 20303 Draper Road, Tomball. $57. Native Plant Society of Texas-Houston Chapter; Register: npsot.org/wp/nlcp; npsot.org/wp/houston/native-landscaping-certification .

THURS., MAY 4: STROLLER GARDEN STROLLS, 9-11am, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free. Register: 713-274-4160.

THURS. MAY 4: RAZZLE DAZZLE BASIL by ANN WHEELER, 10am, The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. Free. arborgate.com
 
SAT. MAY 6: CUT FLOWER GARDEN by SONI HOLIDAY, 10am, Enchanted Forest, 10611 FM 2759, 281-937-9449; 2pm, Enchanted Gardens, 6420 FM 359, 281-341-1206, both Richmond. myenchanted.com
 
SAT. MAY 6: RAZZLE DAZZLE BASIL by ANN WHEELER & CHRIS CROWDER, 10am, The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. Free. arborgate.com

SAT., MAY 6: WATER-WISE GARDENING, 9:30-11:30am, University of St. Thomas, Strake Hall, Rm 107, 3812 Yoakum Blvd. $40. Urban Harvest event. 713-880-5540; urbanharvest.org

WED., MAY 10: WORM COMPOSTING, noon - 2pm, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free. Register: 713-274-4160.
 
THURS., MAY 11: INSECTS IN THE GARDEN, 6:30 pm, Barbara Bush Memorial Library, 6817 Cypresswood Drive Spring. Free Harris County Master Gardener event.  hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf    281-855-5600­­

THURS., MAY 11: THE FOODSCAPE REVOLUTION by BRIE ARTHUR, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu

FRI., MAY 12: BLOOMING BONNETS LUNCHEON, 2:30-4:30pm, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. $25. Register: 713-274-4160.
 
FRI., MAY 12: ATTWATER PRAIRIE CHICKEN NAT. WILDLIFE REFUGE: PRAIRIE OASIS OF SE TEXAS by TERRY ROSSIGNOL.10 am. White Oak Conference Center, 7603 Antoine. Free. Houston Federation of Garden Clubs event. www.houstonfederationgardenclubs.org

SAT., MAY 13: MOTHER'S DAY MAKE & TAKE FLOWERS/MARKETS, 10am, Enchanted Forest, 10611 FM 2759, 281-937-9449; 2pm, Enchanted Gardens, 6420 FM 359, 281-341-1206, both Richmond. $10+. myenchanted.com 
 
SAT., MAY 13: ART IN THE GARDEN, 10am-3pm, Seminar & FELDER RUSHING, 10am, The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. Free. arborgate.com

SAT., MAY 13: INSTALLING & MAINTAINING NATIVE LANDSCAPES, 8 am-4:30 pm, Kleb Woods Nature Center, 20303 Draper Rd, Tomball. $57. Native Plant Society of Texas-Houston Chapter. Register: npsot.org/wp/nlcp; npsot.org/wp/houston/native-landscaping-certification.

SAT., MAY 13: 'DAYLILY DESIRE' HORTICULTURAL & DESIGN SHOW, 1-3pm, Gethsemane Lutheran Church, 4040 Watonga Ave. Free. Houston Area Daylily Society and Houston Hemerocallis Society event.  ofts.com/hhs.
 
SAT., MAY 13; DAYLILIES & OTHER PLANTS SALE, 10:30 am-sell out, Gethsemane Lutheran Church, 4040 Watonga Ave., . Houston Area Daylily Society event. 713-864-0452.
 
SAT., MAY 13: BRAZOSPORT DAYLILY SOCIETY FLOWER SHOW & SALE, 1-4pm, St. Mark Lutheran Church Fellowship Hall, 501 Willow Dr., Lake Jackson. 

 
SAT., MAY 13: BRAZOSPORT DAYLILY SOCIETY FLOWER SHOW & SALE, 1-4pm, St. Mark Lutheran Church Fellowship Hall, 501 Willow Dr., Lake Jackson.
 
TUES., MAY 16: INSECTS IN THE GARDEN, 6:30pm, Spring Branch Memorial Library, 930 Corbindale. Free Harris County
Master Gardener event. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf. 281-855-5600

THURS., MAY 18: INSECTS IN THE GARDEN, 6:30pm, Freeman Branch Library, 16616 Diana Lane . Free Harris County Master Gardener event. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf   281-855-5600

SAT., MAY 20: MINI SUCCULENT OR HERB GARDEN, 10am, Enchanted Forest, 10611 FM 2759, 281-937-9449; 2pm, Enchanted Gardens, 6420 FM 359, 281-341-1206, both Richmond.
myenchanted.com

SAT., MAY 20: SPACE CITY HIBISCUS CHAPTER SHOW & SALE, 1-4pm, East Harris County Activity Center, 340 Spencer Hwy. Pasadena.

SAT., MAY 20: LONE STAR DAYLILY SOCIETY 23rd ANNUAL FLOWER SHOW & SALE. 10am-4pm Sale; 1-4pm Show. Epiphany Lutheran Church, 5515 W. Broadway, Pearland.  Free. lonestardaylilysociety.org; peskine@comcast.net;  713-882-9958.

SAT.,, MAY 20: INSECTS IN THE GARDEN, 10am, Maud Smith Marks Library, 1815 Westgreen Blvd. Katy. Free Harris County Master Gardener event. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf   281-855-5600
 
SUN., MAY 21:  PAYNE'S IN THE GRASS DAYLILY FARM ANNUAL OPEN GARDEN & SALE.  9-5, 2130 O'Day Road, Pearland, Tx. 77581.  Free.  paynesinthegrassdaylilyfarm. com; 281-485-3821 or 713-419-6661

TUES.,, MAY 23, HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS OPEN GARDEN DAY & INSECTS SEMINAR, 9-11:30am, 3033 Bear Creek Dr. Free. Harris County Master Gardener event. Register: ogd.harrishort@gmail.com

THURS., JUNE 1: STROLLER GARDEN STROLLS, 9-10am, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free. R egister: 713-274-4160.

SAT. JUNE 3: TOMATO CONTEST, 10am, The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. Free. Categories and Guidelines online, arborgate.com

THURS., JUNE 8: PROPOGATION & SEED SAVING, 6:30pm, Barbara Bush Memorial Library, 6817 Cypresswood Dr., Spring. Free. Harris County Master Gardener event. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf ; 281-855-5600­­

THURS., JUNE 8: IS REDBUD THE NEXT CRAPE MYRTLE by DENNIS WERNER, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu

WED., JUNE 14: CARNIVOROUS PLANTS, noon-2pm, Mercer Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free. Register: 713-274-4160.

THURS., JUNE 15: PROPOGATION & SEED SAVING, 6:30pm, Freeman Branch Library, 16616 Diana Lane. Free. Harris County Master Gardener event. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600

SAT., JUNE 17: PROPOGATION & SEED SAVING, 10am, Maud Smith Marks Library, 1815 Westgreen Blvd. Katy. Free. Free. Harris County Master Gardener event. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600
 
TUES., JUNE 20: PROPOGATION & SEED SAVING, 6:30pm, Spring Branch Memorial Library, 930 Corbindale. Free Free. Harris County Master Gardener event. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2017-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600
 
WED-THURS., JUNE 21-22: CULTIVATING THE OUTDOOR CLASSROOM WORKSHOP, 8am-3pm, Gregory Lincoln Education Center, 1101 Taft St. $50. Urban Harvest event. 713-880-5540; urbanharvest.org

TUES., JUNE 27, HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS OPEN GARDEN DAY & PROPOGATION & SEED SAVING SEMINAR, 9-11:30 am, 3033 Bear Creek Dr. Free. Harris County Master Gardener event. Register: ogd.harrishort@gmail.com

THURS., JULY 13: A BRIGHT SPOT IN THE HEART OF TYLER by GREG GRANT, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu
 
THURS., AUG. 10: THE GREATER ATLANTA POLLINATOR PARTNERSHIP: A MODEL OF URBAN POLLINATOR CONSERVATION by JENNY CRUSE SANDERS, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu
 
THURS., SEPT. 14: FROM OVER THE TOP TO DOWN UNDER, ADVENTURES IN HORTICULTURE by GEORGE HULL, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu

OCT. 7: HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENER FALL PLANT SALE, Bear Creek Garden, 3033 Bear Creek Dr. 281-855-5600

THURS., OCT. 12: MOORE FARMS BOTANICAL GARDEN: A GERMINATING SUCCESS by REBECCA TURK, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu
 
THURS., NOV. 9: MAGNOLIAS: QUEEN OF THE GARDEN by ANDREW BUNTING, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu
 
THURS., DEC. 14: THE YEAR IN REVIEW by DAVID CREECH, 7pm, Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St, Nacogdoches.  936-468-4404 or sullivanfa@sfasu.edu

If we inspire you to attend any of these, please let them know you heard about it in . . .  
THE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS NEWSLETTER! 
& please patronize our Newsletter & Calendar sponsors below! 
 
PLEASE READ BEFORE
SUBMITTING AN EVENT FOR THIS CALENDAR. 
Events NOT submitted in the EXACT written format below may take two weeks or longer
to be reformatted/retyped. After that point, if your event does not appear, please email us.
Sorry, no children's programs. - Submit to: lazygardener@sbcglobal.net 
 
IF WE INSPIRE YOU TO ATTEND ANY OF THESE EVENTS, PLEASE TELL SPONSORS YOU HEARD ABOUT IT IN 
T HE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER 
  
 
 
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ADOPTABLE DOG OF THE MONTH



PEGGY SUE

Please Help Peggy Sue Get Adopted. She is a super sweet Pointer Mix and former shelter dog. She is about three years old. She has been spayed and is current on her shots. She is very social and plays well with other dogs and people including children. She is very mellow most of the time but does love to play and be silly in spurts. She is house trained and is not destructive in nature. She does need a companion dog.

The local rescue A Chance To Bloom helped us save her from the shelter initially, they helped her adapt to life outside of the shelter and helped socialize her. Now they are helping us to find a loving forever home. She is currently in the care of her foster who is unfortunately very maxed out with his own adopted former shelter dogs. Peggy Sue is a super special dog that is sure to bring her future family some really good kisses and good times in general.


If interested, please contact A Chance To Bloom  or her foster 
Mark Bowen at markbowenhoutx@gmail.com


                                             


                                                ABOUT US



 
BRENDA BEUST SMITH
 
WE KNOW HER BEST AS THE LAZY GARDENER . . . 

. . . but  Brenda  Beust Smith is also:

   * a national award-winning writer & editor
   * a nationally-published writer &  photographer 
   * a national horticultural speaker
   * a former Houston Chronicle reporter
   
When the Chronicle discontinued  Brenda 's 45-year-old Lazy Gardener" print column a couple of years ago, it ranked as the longest-running, continuously-published local newspaper column in the Greater Houston area.

Brenda 's gradual sideways step from Chronicle reporter into gardening writing led first to an 18-year series of when-to-do-what Lazy Gardener Calendars, then to her Lazy Gardener's Guide book and now to her Lazy Gardener's Guide on CD (which retails for $20. However, $5 of every sale is returned to the sponsoring group at her speaking engagements).

A Harris County Master Gardener,  Brenda  has served on the boards of many Greater Houston area horticulture organizations and has hosted local radio and TV shows, most notably a 10+-year Lazy Gardener run on HoustonPBS (Ch. 8) and her call-in "EcoGardening" show on KPFT-FM. 

Brenda recently ended her decades-long stint as Production Manager of the Garden Club of America's BULLETIN magazine. Although still an active horticulture lecturer and broad-based freelance writer,  Brenda's main focus now is   THE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER with John Ferguson and Mark Bowen of Nature's Way Resources.

A native of New Orleans and graduate of St. Agnes Academy and the University of Houston,  Brenda  lives in Aldine and is married to the now retired Aldine High School Coach Bill Smith. They have one son, Blake.

Regarding this newsletter, Brenda is the lead writer, originator of it and the daily inspiration for it. We so appreciate the way she has made gardening such a fun way to celebrate life together for such a long time.
 
 
JOHN FERGUSON
 
John is a native Houstonian and has over 27 years of business experience. He owns Nature's Way Resources, a composting company that specializes in high quality compost, mulch, and soil mixes. He holds a MS degree in Physics and Geology and is a licensed Soil Scientist in Texas. 
 
John has won many awards in horticulture and environmental issues. He represents the composting industry on the Houston-Galveston Area Council for solid waste. His personal garden has been featured in several horticultural books and "Better Homes and Gardens" magazine. His business has been recognized in the Wall Street Journal for the quality and value of their products. He is a member of the Physics Honor Society and many other professional societies.   John is is the co-author of the book Organic Management for the Professional. 
 
For this newsletter, John contributes articles regularly and is responsible for publishing it.
 
 
MARK BOWEN
 
Mark is a native Houstonian, a horticulturist, certified permaculturist and organic specialist with a background in garden design, land restoration and organic project management. He is currently the general manager of Nature's Way Resources. Mark is also the co-author of the book Habitat Gardening for Houston and Southeast Texas, the author of the book Naturalistic Landscaping for the Gulf Coast, co-author of the Bayou Planting Guide and contributing landscape designer for the book Landscaping Homes: Texas. 
 
With respect to this newsletter, Mark serves as a co-editor and periodic article contributor.
 
 
 
PABLO HERNANDEZ
 
Pablo Hernandez is the special projects coordinator for Nature's Way Resources. His realm of responsibilities include: serving as a webmaster, IT support, technical problem solving/troubleshooting, metrics management, quality control, and he is a certified compost facility operator.
 
Pablo helps this newsletter happen from a technical support standpoint. 
 

 

 
 
COUPON: Nature's Way Resources. 50% OFF Pomegranates & Pears at Nature's Way Resources (expires 3/25/17)
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