JANUARY 9, 2018

Dear Friends,

Here is the 235th issue of our weekly gardening newsletter for Houston, the Gulf Coast and beyond. We really appreciate all of our readers hanging in there with us, sharing stories and inspiring us in so many ways. 
 
Thanks so much!
 
This newsletter is a project of The Lazy Gardener, Brenda Beust Smith, John Ferguson and Mark Bowen (John and Mark are with Nature's Way Resources). We also have a great supporting cast of contributing writers and technical specialists who will chime in and tweak away regularly. We would love to keep receiving your input on this newsletter . . . . comments . . . . suggestions . . . . questions. . . .E mail your thoughts to: lazygardenerandfriends@gmail.com. Thanks so much for your interest.
 
Please    or sign yourself up to receive this newsletter by clicking the "Join Our Mailing List" link just below. We will never sell or share our mailing list to protect the privacy of our subscribers.

Enjoy!

Join Our Mailing List!
 

 

JANUARY -- TIME TO PLANT FRUIT TREES & ROSES!  
 
Nature has undoubtedly mastered the art of winter gardening and even the most  
experienced gardeners can learn from the unrestrained beauty around them.
                                                                   -- Vincent A. Simeone, noted arborist; Director, Planting Fields Arboretum State Historic Park


By BRENDA BEUST SMITH
 
Nothing brings out a lazy gardener's gardening ergophobia more than this week's roundup.  Boy, do I admire, and envy, those who can pluck fresh fruit off their own fruit trees.  Hopefully this will be the year (now that I have a new home) when I overcome mine and actually plant some!

Truth is, success with fruit trees (as with most plants) starts with planting the right varieties for YOUR gardening situation.

In the Greater Houston area, there is NO excuse for planting the wrong varieties.  And, yet, this is by far the most common mistake people make when purchasing fruit trees for our unique subtropical climate.


All varieties of the same fruit are NOT equal.  Some are geared to a specific amount of cold. Some will, and some won't, tolerate the sporadic hard cold and often extensive rains we get here.    

Always buy from a source you trust or -- at least -- from a retailer/grower marketing specifically to this area.    
Even better, take advantage of the wide range of expertise now available.   

Almost every Master Gardener group in the multi-county Greater Houston area holds a fruit tree sale this January and February (our optimum planting times).  

 
In addition to these, the nation's largest single-day offering honor goes to our own Urban Harvest , whose Sat., Jan. 13, Annual Fruit Tree Sale will be 9am-1pm at Houston Community College West Loop, 5601 West Loop South.
 
Be assured at the Urban Harvest sale, their 100+ varieties are proven winners in the Greater Houston area's hundreds of Community Gardens, almost all the result of Urban Harvest instructions and assistance.
 
One can plant later in the spring and cross fingers it doesn't get too hot too soon. But for optimum potential, the sooner you plant now, the better. 

Check out the listings below of local sales and fruit tree lectures & classes submitted for publication.   
 
Perhaps the best advantage of shopping the sales sponsored by Master Gardeners and - equally as exciting - Urban Harvest sales, is the array of local experts on hand to answer questions and make recommendations for your specific situation.

For example, I asked Brazoria County Master Gardener Gil Livanec what varieties have him particularly excited among BCMG's incredible array at their Sat., Feb. 10 Citrus & Fruit Tree sale. Gil's said two instantly come to mind . . .  

 
  • BURGUNDY PLUM, left & center  -- - a reddish-purple flesh and skin. Semi-freestone. Fruit keeps well on tree and is self-pollinating. Low chill hours (250-350) make it a 'go to' fruit for the gulf coast. 
  • ARIZONA ARAVAIPA AVOCADO, right -- a Haas variety (Guatemalan) that originated from a very old (est.100 years) tree in Aravaipa Canyon, AZ. It is extremely cold hardy
Gil points out Texas A&M puts coastal Texas in the 400 chill hour zone.  You can review their offerings at https://txmg.org/brazoria.  As with all sales, be sure to go early.  And, if you can, take your own wagon!

WALLER COUNTY:  It's too late to take advantage of Waller County Master Gardeners' Fruit Tree Sale's Pre-Order opportunity. But on Sat., Jan. 6, (day of pre-order pickups), all their remaining inventory will be on sale, including Red Baron peaches, Garnet Sash pomegranates and Texas Everbearing peaches.
 

L to r,  Red Baron peaches, Garnet Sash pomegranates and Texas Everbearing peaches.   
For a full list of Waller County Master Gardeners's Jan. 6 sale multiple-variety inventory, log onto
P.S. Waller County Master Gardeners Training Program starts Jan. 6. Mostly Saturday classes until mid-April. $140. Register: txmg.org/wallermg/classes 

*  *  *

BE AWARE: CITRUS GREENING & CITRUS CANKER:  Two citrus crises do have local gardeners keeping an eye out, although neither has been the problem locally as in other areas.  Still you need to be aware since statewide dictates might affect your purchases.
Even if you're not interested in growing fruit, remember citrus trees have gorgeous flowers


LEARN FROM LOCAL EXPERTS -- A SPECIAL PLUG FOR SALES & CLASSES
            (If your fruit tree sale/class/lecture isn't listed here, send it in. I'll be glad to publish it as well)


SAT., JAN. 13: FORT BEND MASTER GARDENERS FRUIT & CITRUS TREE SALE, 9am-noon, Fort Bend County Fairgrounds, 1402 Band Rd, Rosenberg. fbmg.org; 281-341-7068; FortBendmg@ag.tamu.edu

SAT., JAN 13: URBAN HARVEST FRUIT TREE,  9am-1pm at Houston Community College West Loop, 5601 West Loop South. urbanharvest.org

Sat, Jan 20. URBAN HARVEST BASIC FRUIT TREE CARE. 9:30am-noon $30. University of St. Thomas, Hall, 3800 Montrose Blvd. Register: 713-880-5540; urbanharvest.org/classes-calendar

SAT. JAN. 20:  FRUIT &NUT TREES FOR MONTOMERY COUNTY 8-10am; PLANTING & CARE 10:30-12:30, AgriLife Extension Office, 9020 Airport Blvd., Conroe. $5 per/$8 both. Master Gardener event. 936-539-7824, mcmga.com

SAT., JAN. 20: BARE ROOT FRUIT TREES by DIANNE NORMAN, 1-2pm, Wabash Feed & Garden Center, 4537 N. Shepherd. Free. 713-863-8322, wabashfeed.com 


SAT. JAN. 27:  MONTGOMERY COUNTY MASTER GARDENER FRUIT AND NUT TREE SALE, 8 am presentation, sale 9-noon, AgriLife Extension Office, 9020 Airport Rd, Conroe. 936-539-7824, mcmga.com

SAT., JAN., 27: HARRIS COUNTY FRUIT TREE SALE , 9am-1pm   Houston Farm & Ranch parking lot, 1 Abercrombie Dr., Bear Creek Park.  facebook.com/HarrisCountyMasterGardeners/

SAT., FEB. 10: URBAN  HARVEST FRUIT TREE TRAINING & PRUNING SERIES, 3 session-class, 10am-12:30pm. 1st class: University of St. Thomas, 3800 Montrose Blvd. $90. Register: 713-880-5540,
urbanharvest.org/classes-calendar

SAT., FEB. 10: URBAN HARVEST GROWING FRUIT TREES IN A SMALL SPACE, 9:30-11:30am, Houston Museum of Natural Science, 5555 Hermann Park Dr. $30.  Register: 713-880-5540, urbanharvest.org/classes-calendar

SAT. FEB 10:  PLANTING FRUIT TREES, by HERMAN AUER, 9-10:30 am; Galveston County AgriLife Extension Bldg, Carbide Park, 4102 Main (Hwy 519), La Marque. Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com. 281-309-5065,  aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html

FEB 17, 2018:  SPRING PLANT SALE PRE-SALE PRESENTATION, 8-8:50am; SPRING PLANT SALE, 9am-1 pm, Location:  Galveston County Fairgrounds, Jack Brooks Park-Rodeo Arena, Hwy 6 and Jack Brooks Rd, Hitchcock.281-309-5065

SAT., FEB. 24: HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENER PRECINCT 2 FRUIT TREE & TOMATO SALE, Pasadena Fairgrounds. hcmga.tamu.edu/public/pubSales.aspx 


*  *  * 


JANUARY IS ALSO "ROSE MONTH" for us .  . .  the optimum time for planting roses, especially bare root ones, in the ground in this area. As with fruit trees, you can plant later in spring.  But planting now gives roses the best root production.

In our Spotlight article below, Weeks Roses' Lothar Behnke gives a preview of this famous grower's 2018 introductions that have him especially excited for our area -- the subject of his upcoming lecture: 
  • THURS,.Jan.11: Modern Roses for a Troubled Earth by Lothar Behnke, 7:00pm, Cherie Flores Garden Pavillon,1500 Hermann Dr. Houston Rose Society event. Free. houstonrose.org
  Weeks Roses is one of the largest commercial rose growers in the United States since 1938. Dallas-ite Lothar is a well-known rose expert who's particularly excited about a new Rosette-disease-resistant variety.

NOTES FOR ROSE LOVERS:
  • The Houston Rose Society's Feb. Pruning Meeting is always the most popular of the year for visitors.  Valentine's Day is often touted as our best day to cut back hybrid tea and other varieties.  Hybrids need this for best blooming. Others will be helped as well, but it's not quite as necessary.
    THURS,. Feb.8: BETTER PRUNING FOR BETTER BLOOMING by HRS CONSULTING ROSARIANS 7pm, Cherie Flores Garden Pavillon,1500 Hermann Dr. Houston Rose Society event.  Free.  houstonrose.org
  • If you to plan ahead, the Houston Rose Society's Annual Spring Show will be Sat., April 21, noon-4pm at Memorial City Mall, 303 Memorial City Way. Houstonrose.org.  A highlight of this show will be the participation of Klein Oak High School students, a result of their enthusiasm following a special floral class given by HRS's Gaye Hammond. She has the magic touch.


 

A LITTLE LATE BUT . . . be sure to water well before a freeze is forecast.  Well-hydrated roots can withstand much lower temperatures than dehydrated ones.   


 

CAMELIA SHOW POSTPONED:  The Jan. 13-14 Coushatta Camellia Society Annual Show and Plant Sale has been rescheduled it for Sat.-Sun., Feb. 24-25, 1-4pm, at First Christian Church, 3500 W. Loop 336N, Conroe. coushattacamelliassociety.com; 713-865-6482.

 

URBAN HARVEST CLASSES:  FInancial assistance is available to attend an Urban Harvest class. Contact lilly@urbanharvest.org. And while we're on the subject of this incredible organization, Urban Harvest has something else very special at its Sat., Jan. 13 Fruit Tree Sale on HCC's West Loop Campus: "BUY TO DONATE" Shoppers can purchase an extra tree (or trees) and donate them to Urban Harvest to be distributed to area community gardens & farms.


NOW, NEW MODERN ROSES FOR  TROUBLED EARTH! . . .

  

*  *  *
Brenda's column in the LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER 
Is based on her 40+ years as the Houston Chronicle's Lazy Gardener.  To sign up for this free,  
weekly Greater Houston area gardening report or  past issues, go to natureswayresources.com.


*  *  * 



     


 

Above, l to r, 'Top Gun,' 'Easy Spirit,' 'Easy on the Eyes' and 'Parade Day'
Below, l to r, 'Lady In Red,' 'Rosie the Riveter,' 'Frida Kahlo' and 'Hot & Sassy'


Modern Roses for a Troubled Earth 
Weeks Roses - New intro's for 2018

by Lothar Behnke 
 
2018 marks the 80th year in business since Ollie and Verona Weeks started this venture. Today, we are the only major rose supplier in the US still hybridizing and bringing new products to the marketplace. Here are the new 2018 introductions: 
  • Top Gun - red shrub rose, probably our most-anticipated intro, as Top Gun raises the disease-resistance to a new level, including RRD. Will one ever be able to say total resistance to RRD? Probably not, but just as we heard of "Bullet-proof" terms of roses before, there is no such thing.
  • Easy Spirit - white Floribunda added to our "Easy-to-Love Roses" collection. This will be the best white Floribunda for years to come (30-40 petals).
  • Easy on the Eyes - Outstanding disease-resistance highlights this proliferous Hulthemia-based rose with pink-magenta colors.
  • Parade Day - Fuchsia-pink, striped with white Grandiflora, strong fragrance.
  • Lady In Red - Old-fashioned English-flowered climber. Profusion of good-sized red blooms.
  • Rosie the Riveter - Orangey-gold/pink with gold reverse Floribunda. Moderate frag. Great name.
  • Frida Kahlo - Scarlet-red, striped gold, with red blush on finish, Floribunda. Mild fruitiness.
  • Hot & Sassy - Novel smoky, dark-orange Miniature rose.
Turns out that all 2018 introductions are from the works of both Christian Bedard and Tom Carruth; none of the new entries come from "outside" breeders, which is a bit of a rarity as we tend to scour all corners of the globe for outstanding new crosses.

The 8 new introductions come from crosses up to 10 years ago and more, so the incidence of finding Top Gun with such strong RRD resistance is pure chance, as RRD only reared it's ugliness since that time, and North Texas seems to be the epicenter of the issue.

Please take good care of those beautiful roses.

*  *  *
 
You can contact Lothar through weeksroses.com/contactForm.php or meet him in person at :  
  •  THURS,.JAN. 11: MODERN ROSES FOR A TROUBLED EARTH by LOTHAR BEHNKE, 7pm, Cherie Flores Garden Pavillon,1500 Hermann Dr. Houston Rose Society event. Free. houstonrose.org
 

 
JOHN'S CORNER

News from the wonderful world of soil and plants #32

The etc Group released the 2017, third edition of its report "Who Will Feed Us - The Peasant Food Web vs. The Industrial Food Chain". The full report can be found at http://www.etcgroup.org/content/who-will-feed-us-industrial-food-chain-vs-peasant-food-web. 

There is some very interesting data presented

Peasants (poor people) are the main or sole food providers to more than 70% of the world's people; however, they only use 25% of the resources (land, water, fossil fuel, etc.). This is compared to the Industrial Food Chain (conventional agriculture) that uses 75% of the world's agricultural resources and is a major source of GHG (Green House Gases), pollution and erosion.

For every dollar ($1) consumers pay to food chain retailers, society pays another $2 for the chains health and environmental impact (damages and hidden cost). This is 5 times all governments' combined annual military expenditures.

At least 3.9 billion people are either hungry or malnourished (lack of calories or lack of nutrition from those calories) because the industrial food chain is too distorted and vastly too expensive and will never be able to feed the world.

The industrial Food Chain uses 75% of the worlds agricultural land and in the process annually destroys 75 billion tons of topsoil, responsible for 7.5 million hectares of forest being cut down (over 18 million acres per year), 90% of agricultural fossil fuel use (and GHG) and at least 80% of the fresh water use. This leaves us with a bill of $12.37 trillion (for food and damages) and still leaving 3.9 billion people underfed or malnourished.
 
Domesticated animals on factory farms transmit over 60% of all infectious human diseases, significantly caused by extreme genetic uniformity. Feeding these animals antibiotics, to increase their growth, and to keep them alive, costs the USA alone over $55 billion each year. "Antibiotic resistance is a threat that may equal climate change."

The study found that for every $1 spent on artificial fertilizers, more than $4 are incurred in soil and environmental damages.

Agriculture uses 70% of the world's freshwater usage, over 1/3 of our major aquifers are distressed and 2/3 of the aquifers are being depleted. Note: No water in the aquifers will mean no food in the future. This reminded me of the prophecy in Revelations 6:6-8 on famine.

The study found that the cost for conventional food is $7.55 trillion and the hidden social, environmental, and health costs are an additional $4.8 trillion per year.

Note: The industrial agriculture also uses 100 million child laborers, which violates human rights. When one buys conventional food, they are contributing to the abuse of children.
 
We all know that our teeth and bones use calcium phosphate to make them strong and hard. New studies have found that members of the rock nettle family also use this mineral in their teeth. Researchers at Bonn University have found that Thal Cress (Arabidopsis thaliana) uses this mineral in their trichomes (think spines or teeth) to harden them. When pest insects like aphids try to walk over them they are impaled on the spines.
As more plants are hybridized for larger yields, the quality and quantity of the nutrition in them declines including their pollen. When bees eat the pollen from these plants and when exposed to neonicotinoid pesticides the death rate of the bees is 50% higher than either poor nutrition or pesticides alone. Proceedings of The Royal Society, December 20, 2017.

A study on deforestation by the University of Basel has found that 36 billion tons of valuable topsoil is loss every year due to deforestation, water, and changes in land use. This study supports the data in the etc Group study.

Documents obtained from the FDA through Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) has shown that they expect the usage of the toxic and controversial herbicide known as 2,4-D is expected to triple in the next year. Other items found is that pesticide residues on our food have increased from 37% in 2005 to 50% today. The FDA is also doing less testing of food for toxic chemical residues (if one does not test they will not find anything). A USDA report found that 85% of the food samples tested were contaminated with pesticide residues! Environmental Health News, December 21, 2017. The full article by Carey Gillam, an investigative environmental reporter can be found at http://www.ehn.org/what-foods-have-the-most-pesticides-on-them-2518891617.html

Note: Carey Gillam, the author of the book "White Wash" on the dangers of Round-Up in our food supply and the government cover-up, will be speaking at an OHBA event on the evening of May 15, 2018 in the Brown Auditorium at the Museum of Fine Arts.

A new problem in agriculture is emerging. In California, oil companies whom use water for fracking, which is often contaminated by drilling chemicals and carcinogenic chemicals like ethyl-benzene. This wastewater, is now being used by some growers for irrigation. So on top of pesticides and herbicides we now have industrial and drilling chemicals on and in our food. Halos Mandarins, Pom Wonderful juice or Wonderful pistachios and almonds are among a few brands tested so far that use fracking waste water.

An invasive pest, the Emerald Ash borer is starting to adapt to eating other species of trees. The white fringe tree (Chionanthus virginicus) of the southeast and commercial olive trees (Olea europaea) have been found to host the larva. So far the larva do not survive to maturity. The parasitic wasp species Tetrastichus planipennisi has proven to be an effective control in ash trees; however, they do not attack the larva if it is on a fringe tree. Science News 12/23/17.
 
Several studies have shown that when birds eat seeds treated with small amounts of the insecticide "imidacloprid: a common neonicotinoid pesticide, they lost weight and became disoriented and could not migrate. Science News 12/23/17.
 
 








 



 *   *   *
LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER
CALENDAR EVENTS & ANNOUNCEMENTS

PLEASE READ BEFORE
SUBMITTING AN EVENT TO THIS CALENDAR.   
   
NO EVENTS ARE PICKED UP FROM NEWSLETTERS! SUBMIT WITH REQUEST FOR CALENDAR PUBLICATION 
Events NOT submitted in EXACT written calendar format below may take 2+ weeks to be posted.
After that point, if your event does not appear, please email us. Adult gardening/plants events only 

Submit to: lazygardener@sbcglobal.net  
DO NOT CREATE LINKS IN YOUR SUBMISSION!!!  WE WILL DO THAT. 
 
IF WE INSPIRE YOU TO ATTEND ANY OF THESE EVENTS, PLEASE TELL SPONSORS YOU HEARD ABOUT IT IN  
THE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER! 

   




Wed. Jan. 10: Trees of Houston: How to prepare for spring, noon-2pm, Mercer Botanic Gardens West Side Arboretum Pavilion, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free. Register: 713-274-4160

THURS,.JAN. 11: MODERN ROSES FOR A TROUBLED EARTH by LOTHAR BEHNKE, 7pm, Cherie Flores Garden Pavillon,1500 Hermann Dr. Houston Rose Society event. Free. houstonrose.org

THU. JAN 11:  COLLECTION & STORAGE OF BUD WOOD FOR GRAFTING by SUE JEFFCO, 9-10 am; Galveston County Master Gardeners' Discovery Garden, Carbide Park, 4102 Main (Hwy 519), La Marque. Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-309-5065, aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html

THURS., JAN. 11: PROTECTING AMERICA'S TREASURES by JOE WIEGAND, 10am, Museum of Fine Arts, 1001 Bissonnet. Free. 28th Annual Sadie Gwin Blackburn Environmental Seminar. River Oaks Garden Club event. riveroaksgc.org

FRI., JAN. 12: A CAMELIA COLLECTION - RESTORING IMA HOGG'S CAMELIA COLLECTION AT BAYOU BEND by BART BRECHTER. 10 am. White Oak Convention Center, 7603 Antoine, Free. Houston Federation of Garden Clubs event. houstonfederationgardenclubs.org
 
SAT., JAN. 13: BEAUTY'S COMMUNITY GARDEN PEACE THROUGH P.I.E. CONTEST, 10:30am-1pm, St. Matthews United Methodist Church, 4300 N. Shepherd. Free. peace-throughpie.eventbrite.com; beautysgarden1@gmail.com; 832-910-8261

SAT. JAN 13:  GROWING GREAT TOMATOES, PART 2 OF 3, by IRA GERVAIS, 9-11am; KITCHEN GARDENING by MARY DEMENY, 1-3pm; AgriLife Extension Bldg, Carbide Park, 4102 Main (Hwy 519), La Marque. Galveston County Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-309-5065, aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html
 
SAT., JAN. 13: FRUIT & CITRUS TREE SALE, 9am-noon, Fort Bend County Fairgrounds, 1402 Band Rd, Rosenberg. Fort Bend Master Gardener event. fbmg.org; 281-341-7068; FortBendmg@ag.tamu.edu

SAT., JAN. 13: GROWING HEIRLOOM TOMATOES by DIANNE NORMAN, 1-2pm, Wabash Feed & Garden Center, 4537 N. Shepherd. Free. 713-863-8322, wabashfeed.com

SAT.-SUN., JAN. 13-14: CONROE CAMELLIA SHOW AND PLANT SALE. 1-4 pm, First Christian Church, n. Loop 336 West, Conroe. Free. Bloom entry Sat. 7:30-10am. 713-865-6482; coushattacamelliasociety.com


MON., JAN. 15: HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS SATELITE OPEN GARDEN DAY, 8:30-11am, Genoa Friendship Gadens, 1202 Genoa Red Bluff Rd. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu

TUE. JAN 16:  SQUARE-FOOT GARDENING, by JOHN JONS, 6:30-8:30pm; AgriLife Extension Bldg, Carbide Park, 4102 Main
(Hwy 519), La Marque. Galveston County Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-309-5065, aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html
 
TUE., JAN. 16: THE EXTRAORDINARY PLANT COLLECTIONS AT PECKERWOOD GARDEN by ADAM BLACK, 7:30pm, West Gray Multi-Service Center, 1475 W Gray.  Free. Bromeliad Society / Houston event. bromeliadsocietyhouston.org

THU. JAN 18:  WEDGE GRAFTING, by SUE JEFFCO, 9-10am; Galveston County Master Gardeners' Discovery Garden in Carbide Park, 4102 Main (Hwy 519), La Marque. Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-309-5065, aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html

THURS., JAN. 18: GROWING ORGANIC VEGETABLE SERIES, 6:30-9pm, 10-class course, University of Houston Central Campus. $280. Urban Harvest event. Register:  713-880-5540 ; urbanharvest.org/classes-calendar

SAT., JAN 20: PECKERWOOD GARDEN EVENING AT PECKERWOOD LECTURE TOPIC TBA, 7pm, Peckerwood Garden, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. REGISTER: eventregistration@peckerwoodgarden.org. peckerwoodgarden.org,  979-826-3232
 
SAT. JAN 20:  SUCCESSFUL SPRING VEGETABLES, by HERMAN AUER, GCMG Vegetable Specialist, 9-11:30am; SMALL TREES, SMALL YARDS by SANDRA DEVALL, 1-3:30pm; AgriLife Extension Bldg, Carbide Park, 4102 Main (Hwy 519), La Marque. Galveston County Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-309-5065, aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html
 
SAT. JAN. 20:  FRUIT &NUT TREES FOR MONTOMERY COUNTY 8-10am; PLANTING & CARE 10:30-12:30, AgriLife Extension Office, 9020 Airport Blvd., Conroe. $5 per/$8 both. Master Gardener event. 936-539-7824, mcmga.com
SAT., JAN. 20: BARE ROOT FRUIT TREES by DIANNE NORMAN, 1-2pm, Wabash Feed & Garden Center, 4537 N. Shepherd. Free. 713-863-8322, wabashfeed.coM
 
SUN., JAN 21: SELAGINELLA by LISA GEORGE AND LARRY RUCKER, 2pm, Judson Robinson Jr. Community Center, 2020 Hermann Dr.  Program free.  Associated project $10. Texas Gulf Coast Fern Societyevent.  tgcfernsoc.org  
TUE. JAN 23:  GARDEN TOOL TALK, by HENRY HARRISON, III, AND TIM JAHNKE, 6:30-8:30pm; AgriLife Extension Bldg, Carbide Park, 4102 Main (Hwy 519), La Marque. Galveston County Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-309-5065, aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html

TUES., JAN. 23: "THE DIRT CURE by MAYA KLEIN, M.D., 5:30-8pm, United Way-Greater Houston, 50 Waugh Dr. $20. Organic Horticulture Benefits Alliance (OHBA) event. Register: eventbrite.com/e/dr-maya-klein-md-tickets-39961950269; ohbaonline.org

WED., JAN.24: FUN HARDY PLANTS & PRECISION PRUNING by LINDA B. GAY, 7pm, Height's Firehouse, 107 W. 12th. Free. Houston Height's Association. houstonheights.org 

SAT., JAN 27: PECKERWOOD GARDEN OPEN DAY, 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; eventregistration@peckerwoodgarden.org

SAT. JAN. 27:  MONTGOMERY COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS FRUIT AND NUT TREE SALE, 8 am presentation, sale 9-noon, AgriLife Extension Office, 9020 Airport Rd, Conroe. 936-539-7824; mcmga.com

SUN., JAN. 28: AVOID ST
ARVATION: DEVELOPING THE RIGHT FEEDING PROGRAM FOR PLANTS AND FACTORS THAT MAKE FERTILIZERS INEFFECTIVE by GAYE HAMMOND, 2-3pm. Klein United Methodist Church, Christian Life Center, 5920 FM 2920, Spring. Free. Cypress Creek Daylily Club event. cypresscreekdaylilyclub.simplesite.com

WED., JAN. 31: BROOKWOOD GIFT & GARDEN CENTER TOUR, 8am-4:30pm, Senior Adult Botanic Bus Trip, Mercer Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. $1. Register: 713-274-4160
 
WED., JAN. 31: BOTANICAL SIDE OF BEVERAGES - KATZ COFFEE & KARBACH BREWING CO., 9:45am - 4:30pm, Senior Adult Botanic Bus Trip, Mercer Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. $4. Register: 713-274-416
THURS., FEB. 1: HISTORY OF BAYOU BEND AND IMA HOGG by DINAH WEEMS, 10am, MUD Building, 805 Hidden Canyon Dr, Katy. Free. Nottingham Country Garden Club event. ncgctx.org

SAT. FEB 3:  SIMPLY SUCCULENTS by PAULA SPLETTER, 9-11am; GROWING BACKYARD CITRUS with ROBERT MARSHALL, 1-3pm, Galveston County AgriLife Extension Bldg, Carbide Park, 4102 Main (Hwy 519), La Marque. Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com. 281-309-5065,  aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html

SAT., FEB. 4: NATURE EXPLORE EDUCATOR WORKSHOP, 9am-noon, a Mercer Botanic Gardens event at Big Stone Lodge, 709 Riley Fuzzel Rd, Spring. $40. Register: natureexplore.org/workshops/educator-workshops
 
THURS,. FEB .8: BETTER PRUNING FOR BETTER BLOOMING by HRS CONSULTING ROSARIANS 7pm, Cherie Flores Garden Pavillon,1500 Hermann Dr. Houston Rose Society event. Free. houstonrose.org

SAT. FEB 10:  PLANTING FRUIT TREES, by HERMAN AUER, 9-10:30 am; Galveston County AgriLife Extension Bldg, Carbide Park, 4102 Main (Hwy 519), La Marque. Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com. 281-309-5065,  aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html

WED., FEB. 14: HISTORIC TEXAS TREES, noon-2pm,  Mercer Botanic Gardens West Side Arboretum Pavilion, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free. Register: 713-274-4160.
 
SAT., FEB 17, 2018:  SPRING PLANT SALE PRE-SALE PRESENTATION, 8-8:50am; SPRING PLANT SALE, 9am-1 pm, Location:  Galveston County Fairgrounds, Jack Brooks Park-Rodeo Arena, Hwy 6 and Jack Brooks Rd, Hitchcock.281-309-5065

SAT., FEB. 17: HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENER TOMATO, PEPPER & HERB SALE, Bear Creek Park's Farm & Ranch Club Parking lot. hcmga.tamu.edu/public/pubSales.aspx

SAT., FEB. 24: NATURE EXPLORER EDUCATOR WORKSHOPS (2), 9am-noon and 1-4pm; Mercer Botanic Garden event at Big Stone Lodge 709 Riley Fuzzel Rd, Spring. $40 each. Register: natureexplore.org/workshops/educator-workshops

­
SAT., FEB. 24: HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENER PRECINCT 2 FRUIT TREE & TOMATO SALE, Pasadena Fairgrounds.
hcmga.tamu.edu/public/pubSales.aspx

SAT. FEB 24:  HOW TO GROW NATIVE MILKWEED, by BARBARA KELLER-WILLY, 1-3 pm; Galveston County AgriLife Extension Bldg, Carbide Park, 4102 Main (Hwy 519), La Marque. Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com. 281-309-5065,  aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html 

SAT.-SUN., FEB. 24-25: COUSHATTA CAMELLIA SOCIETY ANNUAL SHOW & PLANT SALE, 1-4pm, First Christian Church, 3500 W. Loop 336N, Conroe. coushattacamelliassociety.com; 713-865-6482.
 
SUN., FEB. 25: DAYLILY BLOOM DESCRIPTION by JEANNIE MALLICK, 2pm-3pm. Klein United Methodist Church, Christian Life Center, Room #C112, 5920 FM 2920, Spring, TX 77388. Free. Cypress Creek Daylily Club event. www.cypresscreekdaylilyclub.simplesite.com
 
MO N., FEB. 26: SOIL FOOD WEB & COMPOST AND MULCHES, 9am-noon, Mercer Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble. Texas Gulf Coast Gardener program. Register: Jennifer L. Garrison, 713-274-4160

FRI., MAR.9: THOSE ADDORABLE HUMMERS by SUE HEATH. 10 am. White Oak Convention Center., 7603 Antoine. Free. Houston Federation of Garden Clubs event. houstonfederationgardenclubs.org

SAT., MAR. 10:  VEGETABLE & HERB PLANT SALE, 9am-noon, Fort Bend County AgriLife Extension Office, 1402 Band Rd, Rosenberg. Fort Bend Master Gardener event. fbmg.org; 281-341-7068; FortBendmg@ag.tamu.edu

WED., MAR. 21: SNAKE IDENTIFICATION, noon-2pm, Mercer Botanic Gardens West Side Arboretum Pavilion, 22306 Aldine-Westfield, Humble. Free. Register: 713-274-4160  

SAT., MAR. 24:  HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENER PEPPER, PERENNIAL & VEGETABLE SALE. Pasadena Fairgrounds. hcmga.tamu.edu/public/pubSales.aspx

SUN., MAR. 25: STEWARDSHIP OF THE SOIL by JOHN FERGUSON, 6pm, Sunday Evening Conversations on Creation Webinar, Lisa Brenskelle, brenskelle@aol.com

SUN., MAR. 25: HIBISCUS CARE by MARTI GRAVES, 2pm-3pm. Klein United Methodist Church, Christian Life Center, Room #C112, 5920 FM 2920, Spring, TX 77388. Free. Cypress Creek Daylily Club event. www.cypresscreekdaylilyclub.simplesite.com

WED., MAR. 28: NATURE'S WAY RESOURCES HORTICULTURAL TOUR, 10:15am-4:30pm, Senior Adult Botanic Bus Trip, Mercer Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine-Westfield. $1. Register: 713-274-4160

SAT.-SUN., MAR. 3-4: SPRING BRANCH AFRICAN VIOLET CLUB 39th ANNUAL SHOW & SPRING SALE, Sat.:1-5pm show, 9am-5pm sale; Sun. show & sale 10am-3pm., Judson Robinson Jr. Community Center, 2020 Hermann Dr. Free. 281-748-8417, kjwross@yahoo.com

FRI., APRIL 13: THE WORLD OF SEED by ANGELA CHANDLER. 10am., White Oak Convention Center, 7603 Antoine, Free. Houston Federation of Garden Clubs event. houstonfederationgardenclubs.org


SAT,. APR. 21: HOUSTON ROSE SOCIETY ANNUAL SPRING SHOW, Noon-4pm, Memorial City Mall, 303 Memorial City Way. Houston Rose Society event.  Free.  houstonrose.org

WED., APR. 25: PECKERWOOD GARDENS TOUR, 8:15am - 4:30pm, Senior Adult Botanic Bus Trip, Mercer Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine-Westfield. $1. Register: 713-274-4160

MON., MAY 14: INTRODUCTION TO THE SOIL FOOD WEB by JOHN FERGUSON, 6:30pm, University of Houston at Clear Lake, Forest Room on East of Bayou Building. Native Plant Society of Texas at Clear Lake Martha Richeson, 713-962-7747

FRI. MAY 11: HONEY BEES - JAMES AND CHARI OF BLUEBONNET BEEKEEPERS. 10am. White Oak Convention Center, 7603 Antoine. Free. Houston Federation of Garden Clubs event. houstonfederationgardencllubs.org
 


If we inspire you to attend any of these, please let them know you heard about it in . . .  
THE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS NEWSLETTER! 
& please patronize our Newsletter & Calendar sponsors below! 
 
PLEASE READ BEFORE
SUBMITTING AN EVENT FOR THIS CALENDAR. 
Events NOT submitted in the EXACT written format below may take two weeks or longer
to be reformatted/retyped. After that point, if your event does not appear, please email us.
Sorry, no children's programs. - Submit to: lazygardener@sbcglobal.net 
 
IF WE INSPIRE YOU TO ATTEND ANY OF THESE EVENTS, PLEASE TELL SPONSORS YOU HEARD ABOUT IT IN 
T HE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER 
  
 
 

THIS NEWSLETTER IS MADE POSSIBLE
BY THE FOLLOWING SPONSORS













                                             


                                                ABOUT US



 
BRENDA BEUST SMITH
 
WE KNOW HER BEST AS THE LAZY GARDENER . . . 

. . . but  Brenda  Beust Smith is also:

   * a national award-winning writer & editor
   * a nationally-published writer &  photographer 
   * a national horticultural speaker
   * a former Houston Chronicle reporter
   
When the Chronicle discontinued  Brenda 's 45-year-old Lazy Gardener" print column a couple of years ago, it ranked as the longest-running, continuously-published local newspaper column in the Greater Houston area.

Brenda 's gradual sideways step from Chronicle reporter into gardening writing led first to an 18-year series of when-to-do-what Lazy Gardener Calendars, then to her Lazy Gardener's Guide book and now to her Lazy Gardener's Guide on CD (which retails for $20. However, $5 of every sale is returned to the sponsoring group at her speaking engagements).

A Harris County Master Gardener,  Brenda  has served on the boards of many Greater Houston area horticulture organizations and has hosted local radio and TV shows, most notably a 10+-year Lazy Gardener run on HoustonPBS (Ch. 8) and her call-in "EcoGardening" show on KPFT-FM. 

Brenda recently ended her decades-long stint as Production Manager of the Garden Club of America's BULLETIN magazine. Although still an active horticulture lecturer and broad-based freelance writer,  Brenda's main focus now is   THE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER with John Ferguson and Mark Bowen of Nature's Way Resources.

A native of New Orleans and graduate of St. Agnes Academy and the University of Houston,  Brenda  lives in Aldine and is married to the now retired Aldine High School Coach Bill Smith. They have one son, Blake.

Regarding this newsletter, Brenda is the lead writer, originator of it and the daily inspiration for it. We so appreciate the way she has made gardening such a fun way to celebrate life together for such a long time.
 
 
JOHN FERGUSON
 
John is a native Houstonian and has over 27 years of business experience. He owns Nature's Way Resources, a composting company that specializes in high quality compost, mulch, and soil mixes. He holds a MS degree in Physics and Geology and is a licensed Soil Scientist in Texas. 
 
John has won many awards in horticulture and environmental issues. He represents the composting industry on the Houston-Galveston Area Council for solid waste. His personal garden has been featured in several horticultural books and "Better Homes and Gardens" magazine. His business has been recognized in the Wall Street Journal for the quality and value of their products. He is a member of the Physics Honor Society and many other professional societies.   John is is the co-author of the book Organic Management for the Professional. 
 
For this newsletter, John contributes articles regularly and is responsible for publishing it.
 
 
MARK BOWEN
 
Mark is a native Houstonian, a horticulturist, certified permaculturist and organic specialist with a background in garden design, land restoration and organic project management. He is currently the general manager of Nature's Way Resources. Mark is also the co-author of the book Habitat Gardening for Houston and Southeast Texas, the author of the book Naturalistic Landscaping for the Gulf Coast, co-author of the Bayou Planting Guide and contributing landscape designer for the book Landscaping Homes: Texas. 
 
With respect to this newsletter, Mark serves as a co-editor and periodic article contributor.
 
 
 
PABLO HERNANDEZ
 
Pablo Hernandez is the special projects coordinator for Nature's Way Resources. His realm of responsibilities include: serving as a webmaster, IT support, technical problem solving/troubleshooting, metrics management, quality control, and he is a certified compost facility operator.
 
Pablo helps this newsletter happen from a technical support standpoint. 
 

 
 
 
 
Save 50%
END OF SEASON CLEARANCE SALE AT NATURE'S WAY RESOURCES

            MOST PLANTS 50% OFF (WITH A FEW EXCEPTIONS)

                 101 SHERBROOK CIRCLE, CONROE TX  
              www.natureswayresources.com or 936-321-6990 
 
Offer Expires: WHILE SUPPLIES LAST