Lupus Foundation
Lupus News
January 2016
From the Desk of the President:  Moving into 2016
by Tharan W. Leopold, LFM President

As we head into our remarkable 40th year, I feel honored to be part of such an amazing community of lupus champions. YOU make our work meaningful and inspiring through your advocacy, participation, and support. We simply could not accomplish all that we do without your efforts--thank you!
 
At the core of our mission is funding lupus research to discover a cure. In this edition of Lupus News, we have the distinct honor to highlight Dr. Erik Peterson (University of Minnesota-Twin Cities) and Dr. Uma Thanarajasingam (Mayo Clinic) who were selected by the Lupus Foundation of Minnesota Board of Directors to receive funding for their proposed research projects.
 
Speaking of research, you will also see that applications are currently being accepted for the student summer fellowship program . Students who apply and are selected as a fellow will have an amazing opportunity to work in a laboratory setting researching lupus.
 
I hope you will join us as we prepare for an exciting 2016, with a host of new and returning seminars, expanded educational support groups, and events across the state. With each effort, we are making great strides toward our vision of "a world without lupus."
 
May a healthy mind, body and spirit be yours today and all year through!

Learn more about neonatal lupus and a rare condition known as congenital heart block (CHB) from Dr. Buyon and meet the Lunds (Kenzie with her mom, Jessica, pictured above), a family who understands the reality of this disease and CHB.
Exploring neonatal lupus with a research expert and personal experience
The basics behind this rare disease and even rarer instance of CHB
Though uncommon, the newborn of a mother with lupus may have neonatal lupus. But the name "neonatal lupus" is a misnomer.
 
First, it's important to note that neonatal lupus is a rare disease. Even though the word 'lupus' is in the name, this is misleading because it doesn't mean the baby has lupus.
 
As Jill Buyon, MD, a 2011 LFM-funded lupus clinical researcher at the New York University (NYU) School of Medicine, and leading expert in the area/field explains, "the name originated because the skin rash seen in babies with this disease resembled the cutaneous lesions seen in adults with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)." 
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Congratulations to 2016 lupus clinical research grant recipients
As we continue to support current research efforts to help realize our vision of a world without lupus, we are proud to present our lupus clinical research grant recipients for 2016. Totaling over $70,000, these grants have been awarded to two Minnesota-based researchers. Grantees and their project titles are listed at the right.

To learn more about each grant recipient's research project, click below.

Each year, the LFM Investment Committee approves award amounts and the Research Committee reviews and ranks grant applications. These funding recommendations are then presented to the Board of Directors for approval.
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Erik Peterson, Ph.D. ( left)
University of Minnesota
Role of SLE Risk Gene PTPN22 in Candida Immunity

Uma Thanarajasingam,
M.D.,  Ph. D.  ( right )
Mayo Clinic
The Human Immune Response in SLE
 

Ask a Doctor
Q: Many doctors have informed me that I should not have any immunizations because it may cause a flare of my lupus. If so, are there any immunizations that won't cause such a reaction?
- Melody, Brainerd
The decision to receive any medical intervention should come down to evaluation of the potential risks and benefits. 
 
Patients with lupus have a higher baseline risk of infection due to impaired immune response. These types of infection are mostly bacterial, followed by viral and fungal. Additionally, many patients with lupus are treated with ... 
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Making an impact on lupus research
Undergrads invited to apply for LFM's 2016 Student Summer Fellowship Program
The Lupus Foundation of Minnesota (LFM) invites candidates to apply for its annual 2016 Student Summer Fellowship Program. Since 1981, LFM has provided undergrads with the unique opportunity to partner with accomplished researchers at local institutions working on lupus-related autoimmune research.
 
The goal of the program is to inspire a new generation of researchers committed to improved detection, treatment and a cure. To date, support from individual donors has provided over $463,966 to offer 118 fellows the opportunity to work on vital research efforts.
 
Fellows work closely with faculty supervisors to plan and execute experiments and perform literature searches and conduct corresponding research in tandem with the principle investigator. Fellowships begin in June and conclude mid-August when fellows complete a final report, which addresses both the project proposal and research question, and they provide a brief public presentation of their research to program colleagues, LFM board members and staff, supporters, friends, family, and the general public.

researcher_science_tube.jpg
Completed  fellowship applications must be received by 4:30 p.m. on Monday, February 1. Candidates will be notified of their fellowship placements in mid-March.
 
Learn more about the Student Summer Fellowship experience from previous fellows through their  blog posts and  video clips. For more information, contact Director of Education  Sandy Parnell
Dermatologist Noah Goldfarb, M.D.
The relationship between lupus and dermatology
Learning the basics behind lupus and skin-related diseases
Approximately 85 percent of people living with lupus have lupus-related skin diseases, also known as cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) . To gain a better understanding of the relationship between lupus and dermatology, we invited dermatologist Dr. Noah Goldfarb to respond to some frequently asked questions.
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Special thanks to LFM's outgoing board members
Acknowledging two individuals who provided a combined total of nearly 20 years of service to support those living with lupus
As we begin a new year, the Lupus Foundation of Minnesota (LFM) offers appreciation to Lynn Clarey and Dale Allen Berry, two outgoing members, for their generosity and support in serving on LFM's Board of Directors.
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Lynn Clarey (left) and Dale Allen Berry (right)
Upcoming events  (click the links for more information and registration)
On January 5, individuals living with lupus and other chronic conditions began meeting in Cambridge. This new LFM Educational Support Group will meet the first Tuesday of every month. Learn more about LFM's Educational Support Groups on our website, and consider joining one in your area today.





February 11: Reflexology: Sole Care





Can you help us?
One way you can contribute to the Lupus Foundation of Minnesota is through the donation of in-kind goods, helping us to reduce expenses and raise further dollars. Needed items include:

For meetings, workshops and seminars
Bottled water
Meals, snacks

For general office
Copy paper
4' x 6' whiteboard

For fundraising events
Gift cards (restaurants, convenience stores, coffee shops, etc.)
Concert and event tickets
Gift baskets and basket items

If you're able to make such a donation, contact us at info@lupusmn.org or 952-746-5151.



Contact Us
Lupus Foundation of Minnesota
The Atrium Suite 135
2626 East 82nd Street
Bloomington, MN 55425

Phone: 952-746-5151
Toll-Free: 1-800-645-1131
Email: info@lupusmn.org
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