February 28, 2017

THE "DAY WITHOUT A WOMAN" STRIKE DETAILS ARE OUT, AND HERE ARE 3 WAYS TO PARTICIPATE
Sara Levine, Bustle
The date of the  "Day Without A Woman" strike coincides with another important event: International Women's Day - which is no coincidence. International Women's Day began in 1908 when thousands of women gathered in New York City to demand better working conditions, better pay, and the right to vote.
The purpose of "A Day Without A Woman" is to recognize "the enormous value that women of all backgrounds add to our socio-economic system - while receiving lower wages and experiencing greater inequities, vulnerability to discrimination, sexual harassment, and job insecurity".
The Women's March website suggests three ways to
participate in the strike:
  1. Women take the day off work - whether you are paid or unpaid.
  2. Refrain from shopping for the day - or if you must shop, choose small,
    women- and minority-owned businesses.
  3. Wear red in solidarity with those participating in and supporting the strike.

Read more here. Visit the Women's March website here.

A monthly column by Heidi Holliday, Executive Director of the Kansas for Economic Growth, 

THE TIDE IS TURNING
Friends, the momentum is on our side.
Last week both chambers of the Kansas legislature passed HB 2178, the first comprehensive tax reform package sent to Governor Brownback's desk. Unfortunately, the governor vetoed the bill. But what happened next made national news - a bipartisan majority of legislators in both chambers voted to override his veto. While there weren't quite enough Senate votes to override the governor's veto, the progress we've made every week since the start of the session is historic.
In the 90 minutes we had to mobilize around Wednesday's debate, over 1,000 Kansans sent e-mails, made phone calls, or tweeted to their senators. That's incredible.
When the Kansas Legislature returns on March 6, the
tax debate will continue (and it will likely move quickly).
As new proposals surface, remember we need tax
reform that:
  1. Is comprehensive and proactive, ending this perpetual cycle of crisis. It must include three core structural reforms: ending the "March to Zero," closing the "LLC loophole," and reinstating a third income tax bracket;
  2. Restores fairness and accountability to our system, ensuring that everyone chips in while preserving current rates for as many people as possible; and
  3. Gets our state back on track to fiscal sanity by ending costly and ineffective tax loopholes for corporations, preventing further cuts to state revenues, and meeting our state's basic needs like schools, healthcare, roads, and public safety.
This week marks the legislature's mid-session recess. Look for opportunities to engage with your legislators in your community and let them know Kansans want comprehensive tax reform in 2017.

You can sign up for updates here: http://riseupkansas.org/get-involved/.
STEVE KRASKE: NANCY KASSEBAUM TALKS DONALD TRUMP, SAM BROWNBACK AND WHY SHE'S SO FRUSTRATED WITH AMERICAN POLITICS
Steve Kraske, The Kansas City Star
She walked away from public office 20 years ago, and she has been out of the limelight for most of that time. But let's just say it plainly:
We still wonder what Nancy would say.
What would former Kansas Sen. Nancy Kassebaum say about Donald Trump? Gov. Sam Brownback? Politics in America today?
And so I chatted her up on the radio recently and had another long talk with her on the phone. From out there in the Flint Hills, it all came back again: the common sense, the reasonableness, the steady thinking.
So of course I wanted to know what Kassebaum would say about Trump and Brownback and politics these days. Here's a hint:
"I'm more sad than mad," she said.  Read more here .


INSIGHT KANSAS: BROWNBACK OBSTRUCTS MAJORITY WILL
H. Edward Flentje, Hays Post
In a flurry of statehouse drama rarely seen, Governor Sam Brownback vetoed the monumental tax bill Wednesday morning, within a couple hours the House overrode the veto, and that afternoon the Senate narrowly sustained the governor.
In the end Brownback had obstructed the will of legislative majorities and struck down the best legislative work Kansans have seen for many years. Two of every three state representatives and three of every five state senators voted to override the governor's veto, falling short by only three votes in the Senate.
A bipartisan legislative coalition had crafted and passed a tax bill that responsively addressed the billion-dollar financial crisis confronting state government.
Read more here.
BROWNBACK TAX VETO STANDS AFTER SENATE FAILS TO OVERRIDE
Jonathan Shorman, cjonline.com
Gov. Sam Brownback's signature 2012 tax policy remains Kansas law after legislators on Wednesday failed to find the votes needed to defeat his veto of a massive package of tax increases intended to help fill the state's budget shortfall.  The House voted to override the governor by a tight margin, 85-40, just one vote more than the required two-thirds majority. But support waned in the Senate, with senators voting 24-16 to override, short of the 27 votes needed.
"While 24 senators formed a bipartisan coalition to override Brownback's veto, the Senate Republican president and majority leader failed to lead and bring about the change they promised to Kansas voters in the 2016 elections," Hensley said.  Read more here .

KANSAS SENATE NEEDS HELP TO REMEMBER ITS TRUE PURPOSE
Jason Probst, The Hutchinson News
Back on the campaign trail last summer and fall, many of today's senators were candidates, and a good number of them were doing all they could to get away from Gov. Sam Brownback and his tax-cut experiment that created a tax-free life for 330,000 business while increasing sales and property taxes on everyone else.
Kansans should do what they can to remind senators still struggling with their purpose of the promises they made on the campaign trail and what the people of this state
expect from them this session. Read more here.
THE GOP'S ZOMBIE ORTHODOXY ON TAX CUTS STUMBLES ON
James Downie, The Washington Post
In 2012, Brownback and Republicans in the state legislature eliminated the state's top tax bracket, lowered rates across the board and created an exemption for "pass-through income," ostensibly to help small businesses. In doing so, they made the classic supply-side prediction: The cuts would unleash a wave of economic growth, which would generate tax revenue to at least partly reduce the cost of the cuts. Everybody wins!  As usual with supply-side economics, that's not what actually happened.  Read more here .
IN WARNING SHOT, MOODY'S CALLS BROWNBACK VETO OF TAX BILL A 'CREDIT NEGATIVE'
Jonathan Shorman, cjonline.com
Moody's criticized the veto in a statement.
"With the state for now sticking with a lower-tax policy, Kansas will continue to struggle to balance its budget, consider deferring pension contributions again, and drain its highway fund of funding for crucial transportation projects," Moody's senior analyst Dan Seymour said.
Moody's commentary constitutes a "credit negative" to the state. Read more here.
PROJECTED SAVINGS ON SCHOOL SPENDING GIVE LAWMAKERS PAUSE
John Hanna, The Wichita Eagle
Kansas legislators were skeptical of projected savings in education spending from Gov. Sam Brownback's plan as they did preliminary work Monday on a new formula for distributing state aid to public schools.
Lawmakers in both parties questioned whether the state would quickly see savings from Brownback's plans to create a single health insurance plan for the state's 286 school districts and centralize some purchasing of supplies and services.
Consolidating health insurance plans is complicated because many districts offer better coverage than the state does to its employees. Also, benefits have been negotiated between teachers and school boards.
Read more here.
DAY OF EDUCATION AND ADVOCACY AT THE CAPITOL
Thursday, March 16,  9am-2pm
KS Statehouse 915 SW Jackson St.
Tickets available here.
 
Kansans gather at the Kansas Statehouse to learn about and advocate for Water, Energy, Air, Land, Transportation, and Health!
  1. Get up-to-date on current environmental advocacy
  2. Visit the Solutions Showcase
  3. Enjoy a Local Foods Lunch (RSVP by March 9th)
  4. Sample New Ideas at the Cookies & Conservation Conversation
  5. Meet with your legislators
Agenda  (a more detailed agenda to come soon)
9:00-9:45: Climate Prayer Vigil
10:00-11:30: Advocacy Overview
10:00-2:00: Solutions Showcase (booth exhibits)
11:30-1:00: Speakers & Local Foods Lunch
1:00-2:00: Cookies & Conservation Conversation
1:00-3:00: Meetings with legislators
MORE BUNK: TRUE DECEPTION TIED TO THOSE WHO LIE ABOUT VOTER FRAUD
Dena Sattler, The Garden City Telegram
It's baffling that people who want to be taken seriously continue to argue, without offering evidence, that voter fraud is widespread in the United States.
Kansas secretary of State Kris Kobach, who apparently knows no shame, continues to spread baseless allegations, both in Kansas and nationwide.
Mr. Kobach also went on TV to spread the fantasy, citing a 2014 study that's been widely criticized as inaccurate and that even one of the authors indicated is open to misinterpretation.
The real voter fraud doesn't involve people casting ballots illegally. Rather, it involves people spreading the lie that voter fraud is common and undermines our elections.  Read more here.
FOR ONE FAMILY, MOVE TO KS
MEANT MEDICAID DELAYS
Andy Marso, kmuw 89.1
All that Michael Sykes has to show for his months-long quest to get his mother's
nursing home bed covered by KanCare is a  pile of paperwork.
Sykes has already appealed an initial denial of his mom's coverage and been turned down again. He's mulling his options. But even before the denials, he was struggling to get answers.
"From that point, from the May 25 application, we did not receive any notification other than requests for information which constituted me faxing them well over 200 pages of documents, trying to meet their requirements so they could make a determination on
Mom," he says. Listen here.
PART 2: KANSAS LAWMAKERS CONSIDERING 'KANCARE FIX' DESPITE OBJECTIONS FROM BROWNBACK ADMINISTRATION
Jim McLean, kmuw 89.1
Kansas was out in front of just about every other state in 2013 when it fully privatized its Medicaid program and renamed it KanCare.
The switch to managed care was one of the first big policy changes made by Gov. Sam Brownback, who promised it would both improve health care and lower costs.  KanCare was immediately controversial.  Some beneficiaries complained to lawmakers about having to fight efforts by the for-profit managed care organizations to reduce their services. Legislators also started hearing complaints from hospitals, doctors and other health care providers, who said they were having trouble getting paid on time and getting the MCOs to authorize certain tests and treatments.  Despite the complaints, Brownback touted KanCare as a success in his 2017 State of the State  address to the Legislature. Listen here .
WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH KANCARE? CHALLENGES INCLUDE APPLICATION BACKLOG
Andy Marso, KPR
Kansans have been facing long waits to find out if they qualify for health coverage under KanCare, the state's Medicaid program. The state has cleared up much of the backlog over the past year, but thousands of applications for long-term care coverage are still hung up. As Andy Marso reports from the Kansas News Service, that's left applicants frustrated and forced nursing homes to absorb months of delayed payments.
LOOK FOR PART 2
KanCare providers, instead of dealing with one payer, are now dealing with three, each with its own set of rules for reimbursements. We'll learn more about the challenges that poses in part two of our story tomorrow (THUR). 
Listen here.
SOLIDARITY EVENT
Wednesday, March 8, 12-5 p.m.
Buford M. Watson Jr Park,  727 Kentucky Street, Lawrence

Women all over the world are planning to go on strike on March 8 - which is also International Women's Day. 

Women are called on to abstain from whatever work you do. In solidarity with women around the world and as a place for women and femmes (and their allies) in Lawrence and the surrounding areas to spend the day together in community, we will have speakers, performers, and more (details to follow). THIS IS AN INTERSECTIONAL EVENT AND WILL BE SAFE FOR ALL WOMEN. We are dedicated to centering the issues of marginalized women. Please join us.

Visit Facebook page here.
LEAGUE & LIBRARY PRESENT
TUESDAY TOPICS
Winter/Spring 2017, 4th Tuesday

Central Branch Public Library
3RD Floor Auditorium, 
Main & William, Wichita

Bring a brown bag lunch, drinks furnished

MEDIA INFLUENCE ON PUBLIC POLICY
February 28, Noon-1 p.m.,
Central Library, 223 S. Main
Today's news travels rapidly, through Twitter, Instagram, and other social media outlets. How has our society changed in the way news is reported? And what impact does this have on the news we receive? Join us as our presenters discuss the way that media affects and influences our decisions as citizens.
This program will be presented by Jeffrey W. Jarman, Ph.D., Interim Director, Elliott School of Communication, WSU.  There will be time for questions from the audience at the conclusion of the program.

These programs are free and open to the public. Feel free to bring a brown bag lunch, drinks will be provided.

5 CALLS DEBUTS WHAT MAY BE THE EASIEST WAY TO CALL YOUR REPRESENTATIVE YET
Sarah Perez, Tech Crunch
But a new one, 5 Calls , has just launched its simple online tool that makes the more cumbersome process of getting in touch with your representatives a lot easier than before.
The site, created by a team of volunteers, isn't very fancy, but it's certainly efficient.
The idea is that if you have 5 minutes to spare, you can place 5 calls - something that's far more effective in terms of influencing your representatives and getting your voice heard than emailing is said to be. 
Read more here.
LOUDLIGHT:  KANSAS LEGISLATURE WEEK 7 RECAP
Davis Hammett, Loud Light
Turnaround week, due process for teachers, Medicaid/KanCare expansion, Veto override attempt. "An exhausting, an intense and incredible week in the legislature". Watch here.
POLICY PUSH: CONSTITUENTS  NEED TO CONTINUE TO SPEAK OUT ON NEEDED CHANGE
Dena Sattler, Garden City Telegram
The bogus economic strategy Gov. Sam Brownback dubbed a "real-live experiment" lives on - for now.
Ultraconservatives in the Kansas Senate recently blocked needed change in a state facing budget shortfalls of more than $1 billion through mid-2019.
A bill proposed would have dismantled the governor's signature income-tax cut legislation of 2012.
More importantly, the plan would lead to structurally balanced budgets in a state that cannot afford to forgo several hundred million dollars a year in income-tax revenue.
But Brownback - in a perpetual state of denial - vetoed the bill.
Read more here.
TOWN HALL FRUSTRATED SENATORS DID NOT SHOW
Gloria Van Rees, KAKE.com
The Alford Branch Library in south Wichita was the backdrop for the Women's March town hall meeting Tuesday night. A standing-room only crowd filled the conference room to voice their concerns to Kansas Senators Jerry Moran and Pat Roberts. Except they did not show up.
That fact did not go unnoticed. One woman, who did not give her name, read an email she sent to the Senators during the town hall. "I'm standing in a town hall you couldn't bother to show up to," she read.
Bill Ripley has seen a lot in his seven decades, but he said he's now worried more than ever. "I don't think in my 72 years I have ever been more upset with the political situation...as I am right now," said Ripley. Watch here .

TOWN HALL FRUSTRATED SENATORS DID NOT SHOW
James Thompson, YouTube
Watch here.
LETTER: LISTEN TO YOUR CONSTITUENTS, KANSAS REPUBLICANS
I have called Sen. Jerry Moran and Rep. Lynn Jenkins's office many times over the last three months. I hear the frustration in their voices. They don't like hearing from angry constituents.
Policies like cutting Social Security and privatizing Medicaid aren't good when people worked their entire lives for them.
I've worked for 28 years. It's our money. Paul Ryan is pushing this.
Many working people like myself are at jobs that no longer offer health insurance plans. My insurance was unaffordable during President George W. Bush's administration and only covered me. I now have affordable health insurance for my wife and I. Leave it alone.
Tribes in Kansas like the Kickapoo wait for a stable drinking water supply while the Trump administration threatens the water up and down the Missouri River. Tribes also watch the oil greed at Standing Rock and wonder if their treaties will be honored or abrogated.
Memo to Republicans: You threaten water, health or retirement for people and you will have angry constituents. We have a First Amendment right to protest you. Listen.
-- MIKE FORD, Ottawa

BECOME A MEMBER OF WOMEN FOR KANSAS!   

Thanks to the efforts of hundreds of determined Women for Kansas, 2016 was the year we began turning the ship around. In the Senate, we picked up 10 moderate seats; in the House, we added 28. Not quite a legislative majority but changed enough so that Brownback and his lemmings can no longer stream roll over us.
 
Up next: two busy years planning for the 2018 gubernatorial/statewide races. With your support, Women for Kansas will again help lead the way.

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Sustaining member $500.00
Student member $30.00

Mail your check to:
Women for Kansas
P.O. Box 8774
Wichita, Kansas 67208

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FAILED EXPERIMENT
Sophia Tesfaye, SALON
The wave of moderate Republicans who swept last year's GOP primaries  in Kansas should have been Republican Gov. Sam Brownback's  first clue that a revolt was brewing in his own party. Fourteen conservative state legislators allied with the governor were ousted in favor of more moderate Republicans who were critical of America's least popular governor  and his failed trickle-down economics experiment in the Sunflower State.
On Wednesday the trend came to fruition and Brownback was delivered a stunning rebuke by Republicans in the Kansas House. Facing a budget shortfall that stands at more than $1 billion through June 2019, Republicans in Kansas recently  passed a bill intended to help fill the state's budget shortfall by rolling back several of Brownback's tax cuts. Yet Brownback's massive cuts were saved by Republican leaders in the state's Senate.  Read more here .

An ACT concerning income taxation; relating to determination of Kansas adjusted gross income, rates, itemized deductions; amending K.S.A. 2016 Supp. 79-21,110, 79-32,117 and 79-32,120 and repealing the existing sections; also repealing K.S.A. 2016 Supp. 79-32-,269.
Senate motion to override veto failed. Veto sustained 2/22/17.
On roll call the vote was:

YEA (24):
Berger, Billinger, Bollier, Bowers, Doll, Faust-Goudeau, Francisco, Givens, Goddard, Haley, Hardy, Hawk, Hensley, Holland, Kelly, Kerschen, Longbine, McGinn, Pettey, Rogers, V. Schmidt, Skubal, Sykes, & Taylor.

NAY - (16):
Alley, Baumgardner, Denning, Estes, Fitzgerald, LaTurner, Lynn, Masterson, Olson, Petersen, Pilcher-Cook, Pule, Sullentrop, Tyson, Wagle, & Wilborn.
VoteRunLead supports the aspirations of women who want to transform our country and democracy through their participation as leaders. 
VoteRunLead is proud to have trained over 15,000 women for political leadership.  Find other women in your area and get connected.  Visit  here .
MARCH FOR SCIENCE
Saturday, April 22
11:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Old County Courthouse
504 N. Main Street, Wichita

Rally with speakers at the Old County Courthouse starting at 11:00 am. 

After the speakers we will march from the Courthouse to the Mid-America All-Indian Center, 650 North Seneca, where we will be hosting a teach-in.

This is a non-partisan event for all people who support science, scientists, and policy based on scientific data and facts.

Visit our Facebook page here.
THE RESISTANCE CALENDAR
Organize. Resist. Repeat.
Add and search for events in your area

KANSAS HOUSE SENDS MEDICAID EXPANSION BILL TO SENATE PANEL
Daniel Salazar, The Wichita Eagle
A bill to expand Medicaid services in Kansas won approval in the House on Thursday after years of effort by advocates.
The vote was 81-44, a strong show of support for expansion but not enough to override a potential veto from Gov. Sam Brownback, who opposes it. The bill still must go to the Senate.
The proposal would establish a health insurance program in Kansas for people who make less than 133 percent of the federal poverty level.
Hearings are tentatively scheduled for March 20 and 21 for lawmakers to hear from expansion proponents and opponents, respectively.
Read more here.

STATE GOVERNMENT: HOW TO GET INVOLVED IN KS
From tracking legislation, to contacting your state legislator or governor, to viewing campaign contributions, this article is
packed full of useful information EVERY  Kansan should know.
PDF of handout available here.
2017-2018 KANSAS ROSTER AND CONTACT INFORMATION
create new graphics 4 this

KS House of  Representatives Roster
Kansas Senate Roster

NOT SURE WHO REPRESENTS YOU?  WE CAN HELP

Find your U.S. State Senator

HANDY & PRINTABLE PDFS

2017 House Contact List PDF
2017 Senate Contact List PDF
Committee Analysis PDF
Transparency Comes to the Statehouse PDF
Advocacy DONTs & DOs PDF

Sign up now to receive action alerts.
GET INVOLVED!
A Brighter Future Starts Today!
Together, we can end the Brownback tax experiment.  Sign up here .
OUR MARCH FORWARD DID NOT END HERE...
Now is the time to get our friends, family, and community together and  MAKE HISTORY .

Click on the graphic for list of actions.
Follow Women for Kansas on Twitter  or Instagram,
@women_for_kansas. Like us on Facebook , and visit our website at www.WomenforKansas.org .
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