March 7, 2017
A WOMEN'S STRIKE FOR THE 99 PERCENT
Sarah Jaffe, Moyers & Company
This is our effort at trying to explain why it is important that American feminists sign onto this call and really try to be a part of this movement.
But also, the strike is about highlighting the ways that "women's work" or "women's labor" is at times unseen. It can be undervalued and underpaid. The strike is about drawing attention to that by, in effect, extracting those many different manifestations of women's labor on March 8th to highlight the extent to which women's labor continues to play a central role in the political and, I would say, social economy of the United States.
Read more here.
KANSAS SUPREME COURT SAYS STATE EDUCATION SPENDING IS TOO LOW
Mitch Smith and Julie Bosman,
The New York Times
The Kansas Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that the state's spending on public education was unconstitutionally low, dealing a new blow to Gov. Sam Brownback, who is facing a rebellion from his own Republican Party over his trademark tax-cutting doctrine.
In a unanimous ruling, the court said black, Hispanic and poor students were especially harmed by the lack of funding, pointing to lagging test scores and graduation rates. The justices set a June 30 deadline for lawmakers to pass a new constitutional funding formula, sending them scrambling to find more money to pay for a solution.   Read more here .
KANSAS, FACING HUGE BUDGET DEFICITS, WONDERS WHAT TO DO NEXT: A Q&A
Nigel Duara, Los Angeles Times
The financial woes of Kansas, which is facing a colossal budget shortfall, took another odd twist this week, and an already messy situation got even messier.  State government expenses are estimated to outpace income by about $1.1 billion through June 2019. So how to balance the budget? The answer has proved elusive, and the debate over what to do has embroiled the governor, lawmakers and, on Thursday, the state Supreme Court.
Depending on the point of view, what's happening in Kansas reflects disciplined government spending or a foolhardy bet that tax cuts would boost the economy. Here are key things to know about the budget crisis.
Read more here .
MIDSESSION CHECKUP: WHICH HEALTH BILLS HAVE A SHOT
IN KANSAS?
Meg Wigerter, KCUR 89.3
The first weeks of the legislative session are a time for lawmakers to put forward their favorite ideas that have little chance of becoming law. In most years, that list would include changes to Medicaid, but things are different with the 2017 Kansas Legislature.
Before the Legislature took its midsession break last week, the House passed a bill to expand eligibility for KanCare,  the state's privately managed Medicaid program. Another bill, which would require the three insurance companies that run KanCare to use standardized business processes,  remains alive in the Senate.  Legislators return to Topeka on Monday to resume the session, and it isn't clear how much farther Medicaid expansion will get.  Read more here .
KANSANS DESERVE BETTER FROM KANCARE
Sheldon Weisgrau, Health Care Foundation of Greater KC
KanCare is in trouble. The state of Kansas' Medicaid program, which has been run by three Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) since being privatized in 2013, is beset by administrative and operational problems that threaten the health and safety of its beneficiaries, among the most vulnerable Kansans.
Patients, advocates, health care providers, and others engaged with KanCare have been sounding the alarm for years. But it took a series of letters  from federal officials detailing the results of in-depth program audits to make much of the public, the media, and Kansas legislators stand up and take notice. Read more here .

QUESTIONS? Call 316-259-6182, wichita@womenforkansas.org or 316-573-5583, wichitametrolwv@gmail.com
KANSAS LEADING THE NATION IN CIVIL RIGHTS BATTLES
Tim Horan, Salina Journal
Kubic said the areas of voter registration and criminal justice are two areas Kansas is leading the nation in a need for civil rights.
"Where the movement is definitely not then, but now," he said.
"There is an assumption among too many people that the civil rights movement ended in the 1960s," he said. "There are too many folks that think, because the black middle class began to grow in the 1960s and 1970s, that suddenly hundreds and thousands of black officials took office all over this country, or that because an African-American man was elected president of the United States that somehow that meant the civil rights movement was then, and not now."  Read more here .
US JUDGE DEFERS RULING IN KANSAS VOTING CITIZENSHIP CASE
Associated Press, WIBW
A judge is weighing the fate of two federal lawsuits in Kansas challenging the constitutionality
of a state law requiring prospective voters to prove their U.S. citizenship.  U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson didn't indicate when she would rule after presiding over a three-hour hearing Friday in Kansas City, Kansas, on motions seeking partial summary judgment.  At the crux of the lawsuits is a disputed voter registration law requiring Kansas voters to provide documents such as a birth certificate, naturalization papers or passport.
The cases challenge the requirement for people registering to vote at motor vehicle offices.
Robinson heard arguments over claims that the state's requirement unconstitutionally burdens the right to vote and violates the right to travel because it allegedly discriminates against U.S. citizens who come to Kansas from elsewhere. Read more here.
DAY OF EDUCATION AND ADVOCACY AT THE CAPITOL
Thursday, March 16,  9am-2pm
KS Statehouse 915 SW Jackson St.
Tickets available here.
 
Kansans gather at the Kansas Statehouse to learn about and advocate for Water, Energy, Air, Land, Transportation, and Health!
  1. Get up-to-date on current environmental advocacy
  2. Visit the Solutions Showcase
  3. Enjoy a Local Foods Lunch (RSVP by March 9th)
  4. Sample New Ideas at the Cookies & Conservation Conversation
  5. Meet with your legislators
Agenda  (a more detailed agenda to come soon)
9:00-9:45: Climate Prayer Vigil
10:00-11:30: Advocacy Overview
10:00-2:00: Solutions Showcase (booth exhibits)
11:30-1:00: Speakers & Local Foods Lunch
1:00-2:00: Cookies & Conservation Conversation
1:00-3:00: Meetings with legislators
PRIVATE-SCHOOL VOUCHERS NEXT ROUND IN SCHOOL FUNDING DEBATE
Bo Rader, The Wichita Eagle
The Kansas Supreme Court ruling that schools are constitutionally underfunded could turn into a fight at the Statehouse over private-school vouchers.
Gov. Sam Brownback took the first shot Thursday with his written response to the decision, in which the court gave the Legislature until June 30 to craft a constitutional formula for funding public education or face a possible shutdown of the school system.
Vouchers for private schools in Kansas have always faced an uphill climb, because most private schools are tied to churches. It's written into the state Constitution: "No religious sect or sects shall control any part of the public educational funds."
The state has worked around that prohibition with a multimillion-dollar program giving tax credits to corporations and individuals that donate to private-school scholarships for qualifying students.  Read more here .
THE LATEST: KANSAS GOVERNOR CALLS FOR SCHOOL CHOICE MEASURES
US News & World Report
11:15 a.m. -- The Kansas Supreme Court has ordered the state to increase its spending on public schools, but it didn't say by how much.
12:10 p.m. -- Attorneys for four Kansas school districts that are suing the state to increase school funding say the state Supreme Court's new ruling
will require a funding boost of at least $800 million per year.
1:40 p.m. -- Several parents say they're pleased with a Kansas Supreme Court ruling that directs the state to increase spending on its public schools.
4:20 p.m. -- Kansas' attorney general says a state Supreme Court ruling suggests that lawmakers should concentrate on helping underperforming students by boosting spending on public schools.
5:15 p.m. -- Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback is calling on legislators to enact school choice measures in response to a state Supreme Court ruling directing the state to increase its spending on public schools.  Read more here .
LEAGUE & LIBRARY PRESENT
TUESDAY TOPICS
Winter/Spring 2017, 4th Tuesday

Central Branch Public Library
223 S. Main,  
3RD Floor Auditorium,
Main & William, Wichita

Bring a brown bag lunch, drinks furnished. Program starts promptly at noon.

WOMEN AND HOMELESSNESS
Tuesday, March 28, 12:00 noon - 1:00 p.m.
Women who are homeless face some challenges unique to their gender. Many have faced domestic violence and have increased risk of assault, some have children to support, and have few job skills that make finding a job difficult. Sandy Swank, Homeless Services Director for Interfaith Ministries, sees these women on a daily basis. Join us as she shares information on the scope of the problem and what the need is in Wichita .

SEPARATION OF CHURCH AND STATE
Tuesday, April 25, 12:00 noon - 1:00 p.m.
Americans often hear the phrase "separation of Church and State" when discussing the proper role of religion in American life. Is this the proper understanding of the First Amendment, and if so, how is that carried out today? This month's speakers will be Vickie Stangl, President of the Great Plains Chapter of Americans United for Separation of Church and State, and Dr. Jamie Finkeldei, Associate Superintendent for the Catholic Schools in Wichita. Join us to learn more about both sides of this important issue .

These programs are free and open to the public. Feel free to bring
a brown bag lunch, drinks will be provided.
'IT'S A TALL ORDER': BUDGET CHALLENGES LOOM FOR KANSAS LEGISLATURE
Jim McLean, KCUR 89.3
It is not hyperbole to say the challenges that members of the 2017 Kansas Legislature face are among the most daunting in state history.  In the next three months, they must find ways to erase hundreds of millions of dollars in red ink to avoid deficit spending, which the Kansas Constitution prohibits. They also must devise a new school finance formula and come up with the estimated $800 million it could take to satisfy the Kansas Supreme Court, which on Thursday declared the current funding formula inadequate  and therefore unconstitutional.
How lawmakers decide to meet those challenges will largely depend on how much the recent election shifted the balance of power in the Legislature.  Read more here .
LEGISLATORS LOOK FOR MORE COOPERATION, LESS CONFRONTATION THIS YEAR
Harold Campbell, Salina Journal
The new makeup of the Kansas Legislature following the November elections has left Salina-area legislators hopeful that cooperation instead of confrontation may reign at the Statehouse this session.
Following the November elections, political analysts were predicting a more moderate Legislature and a more conciliatory tone from some conservative legislators.
Read more here.
DIVERTING FROM THE 'GLIDEPATH TO ZERO'
Dr. Mark Peterson, Hays Post
Undoubtedly many informed Kansans were upset by events in the Kansas Capitol last week. Deliberating at nearly the speed of prairie lightning, the Kansas House and Senate had considered and passed, by nearly veto-proof margins, tax legislation which made progress toward resolving the structural deficit that has disordered the state's finances for the past four years.
They accomplished this in a little over four weeks - laying it on the governor's desk just in time for him to pan the effort before a friendly Kansas Chamber of Commerce audience.  If Kansans really wanted to get on the Brownback "glidepath to zero" program, they would not have dumped all those conservatives and backed all those moderates and Democrats in the last election cycle.  Read more here .
LETTER: WHO REALLY BENEFITS FROM THE LCC EXEMPTION
The Topeka Capital-Journal; Cjonline.com

Resolving the state's financial crisis seems pretty simple if we start with the fact that the 2013 income tax exemption is not for small businesses only. It was intentionally written to include privately-owned companies. It was written by and for Koch Industries, which ranks second only to Walmart in size. Charles and David Koch are each reported to earn approximately $15 billion. Now we see why it's so hard to change this for Gov. Sam Brownback and legislators who are completely controlled by them.
Most Kansans would probably support exemptions to small businesses with fewer than 50 employees. That seems to be the way the LLC exemption was sold to us. 

We never hear that this law has to be saved because it provides two billionaires hundreds of millions in tax write-offs. Changing this now won't affect this year's mess, but that's not a good reason to put it off anymore. Most of us voted for people brave enough to do what's fiscally responsible for Kansas.

Standing together publicly, as we have seen these past two weeks, is the only way to change the big money corruption. We won't stand for schools to suffer or for infrastructure and highway funds to be depleted so two rich guys don't have to pay any taxes. Please call or email the person who "represents" you and demand that this be corrected.
-- MAGGIE DAVIE, Manhattan
LAWMAKERS WHO DUCK TOWN HALLS SHOW TRUE FEATHERS
Jason Probst, The Hutchinson News
Across the United States, democracy is taking place, as previously apathetic or disengaged residents decide to take an active role in their government, largely through attendance at congressional town hall meetings.  Now that people care enough to ask questions and compel lawmakers to do their work, it seems some members of  Congress aren't quite so interested in the sometimes ugly, unruly and uncontrollable American public.
Kansas is no exception.
Both Senators Pat Roberts and Jerry Moran have missed out on scheduled town hall meetings where hundreds of  constituents  gathered to speak to the Washington, D.C., officials.
These esteemed men and women might be afraid, but it's not of violence. It's a fear of stepping out from the safety of their powerful enclaves to face the truth of what they have done to this country and its people.
Read more here.
KS HOUSE RESOLUTION TOUTS REDISTRICTING COMMISSION
Mary Clarkin, The Hutchinson News
Terrell is one of the co-sponsors of House Concurrent Resolution 5011, calling for a commission to take the lead role in redrawing political districts following the 2020 U.S. Census. Most of the 29 sponsors are Democrats, but five Republicans are sponsors, too. 
"Our goal is to make redistricting not political," Terrell said.  She noted that there's a lot of talk around the country about how redistricting has become a political football. The proposed resolution would reduce the Kansas Legislature's role in reapportionment of congressional, State Senate and House, and State Board of Education districts.  Read more here .
INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY STRIKE!
Wed., March 8, 12-3 pm
Old Town Square, 2nd  & Mead

We plan to meet at Old Town Square to rally at 12:00pm.

Bring your signs, your voice  and your empowerment!!  This is going to be a FUN  and POWERFUL day!

Visit Facebook page here.
SOLIDARITY EVENT
Wed., March 8, 12-5 p.m.
Buford M. Watson Jr Park,  727 Kentucky Street, Lawrence

THIS IS AN INTERSECTIONAL EVENT AND WILL BE SAFE FOR ALL WOMEN. 

We are dedicated to centering the issues of marginalized women.
Please join us.

Visit Facebook page here.
INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY, MARCH 8 2017 EVENTS WORLDWIDE CALENDAR
Each year International Women's Day sees thousands of events - global gatherings, conferences, awards, exhibitions, festivals, fun runs, corporate events, concert performances,  speaking events, online digital gatherings and more.
Women's networks, corporations, charities, educational institutions, government bodies, political parties, the media and further communities hold events. Click here to locate events  near you.




3 WAYS TO PARTICIPATE:
  1. Women take the day off work - whether you are paid or unpaid.
  2. Refrain from shopping for the day - or if you must shop, choose small, women- and minority-owned businesses.
  3. Wear red in solidarity with those participating and supporting.
Read more  here. Visit the Women's
March website here.
ETHICS PROFESSORS ON A GOVERNMENT'S OBLIGATIONS, AND KANSAS HIGH COURT RULES ON SCHOOL FUNDING
Steve Kraske & Luke Martin, KCUR
Today we ask the Ethics Professors  which services the government is (and is not) morally obligated to provide its citizens. Health care? Education? A good-paying job? Then, KCUR's Sam Zeff fills us in on a Kansas Supreme Court ruling  with major implications for education funding and equity. Finally, Brian McTavish presents the latest Weekend To-Do List.
Listen here.

HUTCHINSON AREA W4K HOSTS A  POSTCARD WRITING CAMPAIGN
Tuesday, March 14 at 6:30pm
Playa Azul, 701 E. 30th

Wed., March 15 at 11:30am Scuttlebutts,  2609 N. Main

It would be a great idea to order something so we're not just taking up valuable space for the merchants who are so kindly allowing us to gather.

The object is to mail all of these finished, handwritten cards on the 15th -- AKA, The Ides of March.

There will be PINK SLIP postcards for all who are interested in  sending a notice to #45  that he is FIRED!!!!

We hope to see as many of you as possible at one  or both events!

BECOME A MEMBER OF WOMEN FOR KANSAS!   

Thanks to the efforts of hundreds of determined Women for Kansas, 2016 was the year we began turning the ship around. In the Senate, we picked up 10 moderate seats; in the House, we added 28. Not quite a legislative majority but changed enough so that Brownback and his lemmings can no longer stream roll over us.
 
Up next: two busy years planning for the 2018 gubernatorial/statewide races. With your support, Women for Kansas will again help lead the way.

Basic membership $60.00
Contributing member $150.00
Sustaining member $500.00
Student member $30.00

Mail your check to:
Women for Kansas
P.O. Box 8774
Wichita, Kansas 67208

Or charge your credit card via  PayPal
(You are not required to have a PayPal account).
Dues are based on a calendar year.
TOPEKA LEGISLATOR CALLS FOR CHANGES TO KOBACH'S AUTHORITY AFTER SHAWNEE COUNTY TENSION
Luke Ranker, cjonline.com
"A state senator from Topeka has called for the Kansas Secretary of State's power to appoint election officers to be stripped, citing tension between the Shawnee County Commission and the county's election officer.  In response to election commissioner Andrew Howell spending about $85,000 more than Shawnee County commissioners approved in 2016, the commission on Thursday slashed his annual salary by 15 percent. Howell has asserted that because the secretary of state appoints his position, he isn't accountable to the commission and can certify his own budget.
Sen. Anthony Hensley, D-Topeka, told The Topeka Capital-Journal he plans to introduce a bill - likely through the Senate Ways and Means Committee - that would empower county commissioners to appoint election overseers instead."  Read more here .
KANSAS LAWMAKER ASKS SCHOOLS TO 'GIVE US A HAND' TO HELP BALANCE BUDGET
Sam Zeff, kmuw 89.1
Republican Majority Leader Jim Denning, from Overland Park, says he knows taxes will have to be raised to structurally balance the state budget.  The problem, he says, is the 2018 fiscal year, which begins July 1.
He calls that a "bridge year," and says he may want school districts to use 2 percent of their reserve funds to help balance the budget.  Mark Tallman from the Kansas Association of School Boards says he doesn't think educators will be happy with that plan, but might be willing to go along if it means more money in future years.  Listen here .
SMALL KANSAS SCHOOL DISTRICTS ANXIOUS ABOUT STATE FUNDING
Sam Zeff, KCUR 89.3
There's been an awful lot of discussion on what Kansas's new school funding formula will look like and whether the Legislature will still make cuts to public schools mid-year.  Nothing has been decided, which has educators in the state both a little optimistic and a little scared.
At a time when most districts would prefer to be working on how many teachers to hire or what programs to add next year, they're worried about how to simply get through this school year and wondering where state funding will land.  Listen here .
VoteRunLead supports the aspirations of women who want to transform our country and democracy through their participation as leaders. 
VoteRunLead is proud to have trained over 15,000 women for political leadership.  Find other women in your area and get connected.  Visit  here .
MARCH FOR SCIENCE
Saturday, April 22
11:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Old County Courthouse
504 N. Main Street, Wichita

Rally with speakers at the Old County Courthouse starting at 11:00 am. 

After the speakers we will march from the Courthouse to the Mid-America All-Indian Center, 650 North Seneca, where we will be hosting a teach-in.

This is a non-partisan event for all people who support science, scientists, and policy based on scientific data and facts.

Visit our Facebook page here.
THE RESISTANCE CALENDAR
Organize. Resist. Repeat.
Add and search for events in your area

KANSAS SENATE TO DEBATE GOVERNOR'S TAX PLAN
Stephen Koranda, kmuw.org
Kansas lawmakers are getting back to work on taxes quickly after taking a break. Leaders in the state Senate are planning to take up Gov. Sam Brownback's tax proposal Tuesday.
Some lawmakers and the governor have disagreed on a key part of the state's 2012 tax cut, a tax exemption on business income for more than 300,000 business owners. Brownback's plan preserves the tax exemption, but Senate leaders say his proposal won't put the state on solid financial footing.  Listen here .
KANSAS CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION UNDER FIRE BY SEGMENT OF ANGRY CONSTITUENTS
Jim McLean, KPR
The Kansas congressional delegation is under fire - like many of their colleagues across the country - for ducking town-hall meetings with their constituents. At the Kansas GOP convention last month, members of the delegation explained their reaction to the protesters at their offices .
Listen here .
WAGLE REFUSED TO LEAD
Salina Journal
On Feb. 14, we ran an op-ed authored by Senate President Susan Wagle. She wrote, "There's a $350 million elephant in the room, and it's time to acknowledge it." Less than two weeks later, the Kansas Senate was faced with a monumental decision: would it override the governor and repeal the 2012 tax cuts that have cost the state billions of dollars?  Read more here .
STATE GOVERNMENT: HOW TO GET INVOLVED IN KS
From tracking legislation, to contacting your state legislator or governor, to viewing campaign contributions, this article is
packed full of useful information EVERY  Kansan should know.
PDF of handout available here.
2017-2018 KANSAS ROSTER AND CONTACT INFORMATION

KS House of  Representatives Roster
Kansas Senate Roster

NOT SURE WHO REPRESENTS YOU?  WE CAN HELP

Find your U.S. State Senator

HANDY & PRINTABLE PDFS

2017 House Contact List PDF
2017 Senate Contact List PDF
Committee Analysis PDF
Transparency Comes to the Statehouse PDF
Advocacy DONTs & DOs PDF
Follow Women for Kansas on Twitter  or Instagram,
@women_for_kansas. Like us on Facebook , and visit our website at www.WomenforKansas.org .
Stay In Touch

Facebook    Twitter