A Message from Sandy Moret
Last week, fishing guides gathered in Islamorada on a windy day, spelling out the word "HELP" with flats skiffs, yet another plea for change from some of those most affected by the ongoing water crisis in South Florida. I recently wrote a piece about how much I've seen the South Florida fishery change since I started fishing down here in the 1970s. For those who are on the water daily making a living, the changes are profound and heartbreaking. 

Tomorrow, many captains and anglers from around Florida are taking days off of work to travel to Tallahassee to make their voices heard, imploring lawmakers to follow what was outlined by the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan in 2000 and build the reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee to help store, clean and properly convey fresh water, sending more water south to Florida Bay.

Whether or not you are able to attend tomorrow's event, I thank you for your support of the Now or Neverglades movement. We have come a long way in our fight for Everglades restoration, and it is the grassroots effort of people like you that is making an indelible impact. 

Sincerely,

Islamorada, FL
Urgent Call to Action
Now or Neverglades Sportfishing Day TOMORROW


HELP SAVE FLORIDA'S ESTUARIES!

Tomorrow at 4 pm at the Edison Restaurant in Tallahassee, hundreds will gather to make our collective voices heard. Together we will meet with legislators from our districts and from all parts of Florida. We will also hear from Senator Negron and other legislators  regarding the importance of southern storage to reduce the discharges and bring water south to the Everglades & Florida Bay. We hope to see you there!

If you can't join us in Tallahassee, Text the word WATER to 52886 and help us make a difference!
Now or Neverglades Declaration

Nearly 59,000 have signed the declaration to date. Tomorrow, hundreds of sportsmen and women will gather in Tallahassee to make their voices heard.

If you haven't signed the declaration, sign today , and if you have, share this email with your friends!

Text 'SOUTH' to 91990' to sign a mobile-friendly NON declaration.

In The News

by Chris Maroney, co-founder of Bullsugar.org

We don't want to inconvenience the sugar industry any more than necessary to stop the destruction of the St Lucie and Caloosahatchee estuaries. We certainly don't want to derail this bill, which has taken so much effort and courage on the part of so many. But slashing the size of the reservoir at the 11th hour by 33 percent? C'mon. We know that the brunt of this short-change will fall on the people of Fort Myers and Stuart, and that's already been happening for far too long. But we've also learned that in times of drought, Everglades National Park and the Keys are in the crosshairs. Stuart's problem is Islamorada's problem too, and the solution is storing, treating, and sending *enough* clean freshwater south to keep all three estuaries in balance.

Source: Bullsugar

Senate President Joe Negron on Tuesday filed a sweeping rewrite of his top priority legislation to build a reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee, abandoning plans to buy up to 60,000 acres of agriculture land and relying on more state-owned and state-leased sugar fields to store and clean water to be sent into Florida Bay.

Source: Miami Herald 

by Sandy Moret

As an active Member of the Florida Congressional Delegation when the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) was negotiated, authorized and passed in 2000, I read with dismay the recent public comments by state Rep. Matthew Caldwell, R-North Fort Myers, that pursuing a reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee would "disrupt Everglades progress."

Caldwell favors "more time." I think seventeen years is a long wait. I had hopes my grandchildren wouldn't have to swim and fish in stinky, degraded water discharged from Lake O. My response to Rep. Caldwell is, "enough is enough; don't tell me to wait 'til 2025. That was never the intent of CERP." It appears that timeline is an arbitrary distraction conjured up by those with a different "plan."


by Porter Goss

As an active Member of the Florida Congressional Delegation when the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) was negotiated, authorized and passed in 2000, I read with dismay the recent public comments by state Rep. Matthew Caldwell, R-North Fort Myers, that pursuing a reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee would "disrupt Everglades progress."

Caldwell favors "more time." I think seventeen years is a long wait. I had hopes my grandchildren wouldn't have to swim and fish in stinky, degraded water discharged from Lake O. My response to Rep. Caldwell is, "enough is enough; don't tell me to wait 'til 2025. That was never the intent of CERP." It appears that timeline is an arbitrary distraction conjured up by those with a different "plan."

Source: News Press

The Florida Everglades are critical to the survival of local birds, reptiles and millions of people. As urban development has increased, the incredibly rare and bio-diverse habitat has become vulnerable to rising sea water encroachment. Billions of dollars have been spent on restoration, but both science and politics have made efforts more complicated. Special correspondent Duarte Geraldino reports.

Source:  PBS
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