JULY 2015

Updates from TRIPLL!

The Translational Research Institute on Pain in Later Life (TRIPLL) is an NIH funded Edward R. Roybal Center. Our eNewsletter features recent news, events and funding opportunities related to pain and aging. In this issue we highlight studies that explore associations between chronic pain and living arrangements,  pain and coping strategies in older adults and pain assessment tools; as well as an upcoming event and recent funding opportunities.  
In This Issue
RECENT RESEARCH

Living Arrangements, Social Networks and Onset or Progression of Pain Among Older Adults in Singapore

In a recent study published in the Geriatrics & Gerontology International Journal, authors evaluated the development and progression of pain in elderly Singaporeans. This longitudinal study used prospective data from the Social Isolation Health and Lifestyles Survey (SIHLS) to examine factors associated with self-reported chronic pain over time in the elderly multi-ethnic Asian population. The study found that there is a high prevalence of chronic pain among community-dwelling older adults in Singapore. Additionally, authors reported an association between chronic pain and the living arrangement and social network of the elderly in Singapore. Read full article  

 


Pain in Community-Dwelling Elderly African Americans

In the Journal of Aging and Health, authors examined the type and severity of pain within a sample of 400 underserved elderly African Americans located in South Los Angeles. Within this population, two thirds of the study participants reported a level of 5 or higher on a pain scale of 0-10, where 0 is no pain and 10 is the worst possible pain. In addition, participants with severe levels of pain reported insomnia, depression, and/or arthritis. The authors suggested that individuals with chronic conditions would benefit from "multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary interventions." Read full article  

 

 Pain and Aggression in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

In the Nursing Research Journal, researchers examined the relationship between pain and aggressive behavioral symptoms in nursing home residents. The authors analyzed pain assessment items from nursing home residents diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia. The study found that residents with severe dementia were unable to self-report pain because of their inability to remember, interpret, and respond to pain. As a result, they were less likely to receive adequate pain treatment, which increases the risk of physical aggression. Due to the lack of effective pain management in nursing home residents with dementia, the study recommends that nursing home staff members incorporate comprehensive pain assessments that include measures of behavioral pain indicators. Read full article 

 

UPCOMING EVENTS
Alzheimer's Association International Conference  

July 18-23, 2015
Washington, DC

The Alzheimer's Association International Conference? (AAIC) is the world's largest forum for the dementia research community. International investigators, clinicians and care providers gather annually to share the latest study results, theories and discoveries to bring the world closer to breakthroughs in dementia science.
Please  click here  for more information.

RECENT PAIN AND AGING RELATED FUNDING
Grants for Early Medical/Surgical Subspecialists' Transition to Aging Research (GEMSSTAR) (R03)

 

NIH/NIA 

 
Funding Amount: Up to $75,000
LOI Due  Date: September 7, 2015
 

The Future Leaders in Pain Research grant program was established in 2005 to fund pain research projects of doctoral-prepared investigators who have not yet attained NIH RO1 level funding. The purpose of this grant is to encourage research in pain that will add to the existing body of knowledge, and to allow investigators to develop pilot data that will aid them in securing additional major grant funding for continued pain research. 

More information

Networks to Develop Priority Areas of Behavioral & Social Research (R24)

 

NIH/NIA 

 
Funding Amount: Up to $175,000
LOI Due  Date: December 14, 2015
 

The Future Leaders in Pain Research grant program was established in 2005 to fund pain research projects of doctoral-prepared investigators who have not yet attained NIH RO1 level funding. The purpose of this grant is to encourage research in pain that will add to the existing body of knowledge, and to allow investigators to develop pilot data that will help them secure additional major grant funding for continued pain research. 

More information

We welcome your feedback about what you would like include in future eNewsletters. 
Email suggestions and news items to mid2022@med.cornell.edu

  

The Translational Research Institute on Pain in Later Life (TRIPLL) is an
NIA funded Edward R. Roybal Center with a focus on persistent pain due to both cancer and non-cancer related causes. TRIPLL is a collaboration between investigators at Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University in Ithaca and The Hebrew Home at Riverdale.