This Weeks $25 Scruffy Bucks Winner:
Jennifer Ackley
Check your email for details on how to claim your prize
Accepted at all Scruffy City Locations
FRIDAY JUNE 23RD
SIRSY
@ SCRUFFY CITY HALL
LITTLE BAND. BIG SOUND. ~ Boston Globe
CHECK OUT " CANNONBALL" FEATURED ON THE THE SHOWTIME SERIES SHAMELESS.
ROLLING STONE MAGAZINE'S:

10 New Country Artists You Need to Know: January 2017

Jaime Wyatt
MONDAY JUNE 26TH
AT PRESERVATION PUB


Sounds Like: Vintage California country that's equal parts humor and humility, with a few middle fingers thrown in for good measure


For Fans of: Margo Price, Elizabeth Cook, outlaw country artists who have actually served time


Why You Should Pay Attention: Los Angeles country singer Jaime Wyatt has seen a thing or two – after getting her first record deal at 17, she developed a drug problem, robbed her dealer and landed in the county jail for eight months. She never stopped writing, though, and her new album Felony Bluesoffers a fresh, thoughtful take on prison songs from someone who knows firsthand about being on the wrong side of the law.


She Says: "I'm just stoked I'm not in jail or rehab right now. And I'm very proud of this record. It was easier to make this record than it was to live it ... Other folks have had it way harder than me as far as oppression and injustice, but I still had to do eight months in county for robbing a dealer, so I was pretty pissed. Still, if you have the attitude towards the court and the cops of 'You can't keep me down. I'm living it up on easy street here in jail, getting three free meals a day and a chauffeur to court. And thanks for getting my mail,' it sort of makes things easier." 


Hear for Yourself: "Stone Hotel" is a rollicking indictment of The Man, delivered with Wyatt's smoky, unrepentant vocals. B.M.


-Rolling Stone Magazine 


MONDAY JUNE 26TH
JAMIE WYATT 
BROCK ZEMAN
9:00 pm Preservation Pub


EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH THE ROSHAMBEAUX


Atlanta's Roshambeaux are a two-piece semi-electronic outfit that rock the house like no two-piece semi-electronic outfit you've ever heard before.


Working overtime whenever they mount a stage, singer-guitarist Kyle Iconic and drummer J. Chastain trade off on keyboards while using their respective axes to trigger various loops and effects, raising a fiercely funk ruckus that has as much in common with acid rock and R&B as it does with EDM.


Iconic relates that he and Chastain were both engaged in various other creative endeavors when they were introduced by mutual friends roundabout 2010. "We both had other projects, but none of those projects were quite what we wanted to be doing," Iconic says.


"I was always fascinated by electronic music, but everyone else I knew seemed to want to be in a four-piece rock band. So I put that on the back burner, until I met J.He had the same basic ideas about electronic music that I did, so we said, 'Why not start a project that represents all of the things we want to do'"


It was a truly combustible pairing  -- a guitar player with swing, swag, and a serious soul jones, a whiz-kid drummer and multi-instrumentalist who learned Deep Purple licks from his paternal grandmother, both of them yearning to cast off the shackles of the standard strings-and-drums rock band formula.


Through the years, they've been compared to the likes of Prince and Hendrix and Lenny Kravitz -- maybe because of guitarist Iconic's light-brown skin and mighty mountain of hair -- and to garage bands like the White Stripes and the Black Keys -- maybe because most rock writers can't count past two. But while those comparisons may be lazy, they're not entirely off-base; Roshambeaux bear some sonic resemblance to all of those esteemed outfits, plus a dozen or so more, all depending on the moment and the song.


Iconic and Chastain call what they do "Rock-tronic Motown," or some such thing, and that's about as close as anyone will come to pinning down their singular stew of swinging rock and heavy funk.


Says Iconic,"The reaction we get from people that we're most proud of is when someone comes up and says to one of us, 'I've never seen or heard anything like this. Where have you guys been?' We're trying to present familiar elements in ways that people haven't seen before.


"People when they hear us, they tend to compare us to something else they like. We don't really care, as long as they're having a good time."


Roshambeaux recently released their second full-length album, "After Math," the follow-up to their 2013 debut "Iilluminaughty."  What happens next is anyone's guess.


"We might decide to release an ambient record, or another rock record," Iconic says. "We really don't have a plan. The one thing that has stayed constant is that we always do exactly what we want to do."


Roshambeaux will play Preservaiton Pub Friday, June 30th

SNEAK PEEK AT THE
LOST TALES OF SCRUFFY CITY
WALKING TOUR 
COMING SOON!
 

Stroll back to the north end of Market Square, past its stage. Turn right on Wall and walk southward till you come to an alley on your right. Now, go boldly into that alley…

Artists in the Alley


Explore the art-covered walls of Strong Alley between Market Square and Gay Street


while you consider smell and its place in Scruffy City history. 

Quite literally, what visitors to the 20th century Market House most remembered was its smell. 


Children would make wagers in the 1950s to see who could go into the bowels of the famously rat and bug-infested Market House and endure longest the smells of fish, manure, raw meat and strong coffee.


In addition to Strong, the exciting anthropological find through which you are now exploring is also known as Artists Alley. Filled with exceptional graffiti art, some by artists who command thousands per piece in fine galleries, Artists Alley is perhaps the most visually interesting street in Knoxville. Hundreds visit it each day, most photographing their wedding parties, fashion lines, rock bands, or family portraits against the colorful graffiti and timeworn walls of the historic alley.


As you stroll through this amazing public museum, you will note beautiful sights...  and evocative smells. 


Fittingly, Scruffy City has been more than a tag in the muraled history of waste management... Those bulk trash containers heaved over the articulated metal shoulders of garbage trucks were invented by a Knoxvillian named George Dempster in 1935. 


Dempster replaced the frail lifting prowess of mere men by creating his waste-terminating machines. and later served as Mayor of Dempster-Dumpster City for 18 years, fittingly in the 1950s era of the fragrant Market House. Poetically, Mayor Dumpster obsessed about (and was instrumental in) the removal of the unpleasantly odoriferous Market House from the Square.