December 20, 2017
  
Don't hang up your gardening hat just yet
 
By Rhianna Miller
RubberMulch
 
Gardening doesn't have to end with your final summer crops each year. Whether you live in milder winter regions or where the snow piles up high, there are so many different gardening projects available to fill the winter months and keep your pastime going until spring. Below are a few great wintertime gardening ideas to keep you busy and productive in the coming months.
 
Plant Winter Gardens . Swap out your summer containers for winter containers with frost-tolerant flowers and greens such as evergreens, cabbage, twigs, and strings of lights. In milder regions, rotate your garden to a winter one with plant greens, root crops, herbs (depending on your region), and other hardy vegetables.
 
Indoor Gardening. There are many herbs that can easily be moved indoors during the winter months, such as rosemary, basil, and parsley. Just keep your containers near a window for maximum sunlight. Salad greens are also a cinch to grow indoors with the right amount of light and warmth. Just avoid placing them near cold windows. Other plants like white jasmine, narcissus, and cyclamen open beautiful blossoms during the cool seasons of the year. Even small lemon trees can be grown indoors during the winter months.
 
Plan Next Spring's Garden. Winter is the perfect time to start planning your summer garden. There are so many wonderful resources online to help you do the job easily like Smart Gardener or Gardena's My Garden. During the winter you can lay out your garden, decide what you want to plant, request seed catalogs, and order flower and vegetable seeds, as well as, any new gardening tools and accessories at an off-season discount (think trellises, fencing, compost bin, and plant containers).
 
Research New Plants and Flowers. Take inventory of your yard and landscaping in the fall and note areas that are lacking and need filling in. Decide if you're looking for plants, trees, shrubs, or flowers. Take some time for researching plants and figuring out what's native to your region and would grow the best. Look through online photo galleries, browse through Pinterest, and visit the websites for different seed retailers and see what their offerings are. Once you narrow down your selections, you'll be ready to order once spring arrives.
 
Winter Care and Maintenance. There are a lot of things you can do in fall and winter to help prepare yourself for spring. Many of the items on the list take some time and effort and you may not find the time until the cooler months arrive. Things to add to your winter care and maintenance list are cleaning off tools, wrapping terra-cotta and ceramic pots in bubble plastic, organizing seeds, properly storing hoses and tools, and checking the supplies you'll need for seed starting. The good news is that you may also find some deals online and even in stores with left over gardening tools and supplies.
 
Prepare A List and A Schedule . First off, you have to map out a winter gardening itinerary to follow. You need to know your area's frost dates, for starters. The USDA site has a plant hardiness zone map you can use as reference to know which plants are best at surviving cold weather, and which need special care. You can then schedule the chores, tasks, and other activities that need to be done in your winterizing list. Small acts like rolling up garden hoses, putting plastic containers away to prevent from cracking, and draining the fuel tank of lawn mowers will save you a lot of heartache (and money) when spring rolls around.
 
Trim, Clean and Put Away . Before it gets too cold to do outdoor activities, clean up garden debris as best as you can in milder weather. Leaves, dead stalks, decaying foliage, and other garden refuse can become a breeding ground for pests. Rake fallen leaves, trim overgrown shrubbery, and compost where you can. Don't forget to put away garden accessories like buckets, hoses, rakes, and others - keep them in a shed so they won't freeze or rust. Remember to cover your compost with a tarp or a thick layer of hay so that it won't get soggy with snow. Give your garden a general cleaning so that it still looks presentable after all the snow melts.
 
Get Rid of Weeds. Don't neglect weeding pre-winter. Many can survive the cold and wreak havoc on your plants. Carefully remove those with seed heads so that none will come out. Even a tiny portion of seeds can germinate fast and invade your garden in a matter of weeks. Make sure the weeds are nowhere in contact with your other plants and soil. Put them in a covered garbage bin where they belong.
 
Keep Shrubs Snug and Warm . Plants can experience chill, too. You can wrap shrubs with a burlap sack or a thick fabric to keep them from freezing and suffering windburn. Never use plastic because it doesn't breathe, and can overheat young plants. When the weather becomes warmer, remove the wrapping right away.
 
Mulch, Mulch, Mulch. Plants need extra warmth during winter, and mulching will act as a protective blanket for them. New plants that have not taken root yet especially need mulching. It will keep moisture where it needs, and prevent weeds from taking hold, while keeping soil temperature even for tender plants. Check in mid-January to early February if the mulch has moved from heavy wind and rain, and reapply as needed.
 
Rhianna Miller is the Home & Garden Design Expert at RubberMulch. RubberMulch is made from 100 percent recycled rubber, is weather resistant, durable, and is specifically designed to protect children from falls on the playground.
Does eclipse equal night in plant life?
 
American Society of Agronomy
 
On August 21, 2017, about 215 million American adults watched one of nature's most dramatic events: a total solar eclipse. However, most of the country could only see a partial eclipse. The path of the total eclipse was a strip just 70 miles wide, arcing across the country from Oregon to South Carolina.
 
The University of Missouri-Columbia lies directly on that path of totality. Scientists there knew they had a once-in-a-generation opportunity to study how a total eclipse affects plants. During the event, there would be 45 minutes of gradually decreasing light. Temperatures would also fall. Next would be two minutes and 36 seconds of total eclipse: a span as dark as night and noticeably cooler. Light and warmth would then gradually return.
 
Tim Reinbott and colleagues at the university's South Farm Research Center were curious to see how plants would react when night conditions interrupted the day. Would leaves fold up for the night? Would plants respond more to the change in light or the change in temperature? Would different kinds of plants respond differently?
 
"We were wondering if plants had a circadian rhythm - meaning that they have sensed when sunup and sundown are and have developed an internal clock, separate from sensing changes in light," Reinbott said. "So when we have totality of the eclipse in the middle of the day, would they even react?"
 
The team chose to observe four types of plants with different habits:
  • Mimosa close their leaves at night and when they are touched.
  • Oxalis (purple clover) close their leaves and fold their flowers at night.
  • Drought-stressed soybeans fold up their leaves during the day and open them at night.
  • Drought-stressed corn curls during the day and uncurls at night.
The research team prepared two mimosa plants in advance by exposing them to either 72 hours of light or 72 hours of darkness. One mimosa was exposed to a normal light/dark cycle.
 
The varied results have left the researchers with interesting questions.
 
Reinbott reported, "The regular mimosa responded to the eclipse by closing up its leaves, just like at sundown. But when we first exposed the mimosa plants to 72 hours of light or dark, they did not respond to the eclipse." Reinbott thinks it may be because the light spectrum, some of which is undetectable to the human eye, had changes the plants may have responded to. "We have data that show slight differences in the light spectrum during totality and sundown. Possibly those plants exposed to 72 hours of light or darkness lost some of their photoreceptors for one of these wavelengths (blue and red/far-red)."
 
The oxalis responded very differently. It was a hot day, so the oxalis leaves were folded up to reduce sun exposure and retain water. As the eclipse started, the oxalis leaves opened up. After totality passed, the leaves closed again. But the oxalis did not fold its flowers as they do at dusk. "This shows that they have a circadian rhythm and were not fooled by the change in light from the eclipse. They only responded to the temperature change," Reinbott concluded.
 
The drought-stressed corn did not visibly change much in response to the eclipse. Drought-stressed soybeans unfolded during the eclipse and then folded back up afterward, but it was unclear whether this was due to the temperature change or the light change. These soybeans behaved the same during totality as they do at sundown, showing they did not have a circadian rhythm.
 
Reinbott is looking forward to the next total eclipse over the same area in just seven years. In 2024 Reinbott and his team want to look more closely at plants' photosynthesis and water management. They also hope to learn more about the role of the light spectrum and what triggers the circadian rhythm in plants.
 
Reinbott presented his research at the October Annual Meeting of the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America in Tampa, Florida.
Gardening tips

If you want to start your own tomato transplants, now is a good time to order seed and supplies. Also, make sure you have a good light source. A simple 4-ft.-long fluorescent light fixture is sufficient. In most areas of the state, it will soon be time to get them started. Count back 6 to 8 weeks from your scheduled planting date to start transplants.  
 
Have a favorite gardening tip you'd like to share? Texas Gardener's Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a copy of Texas Gardene r's 2018 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Garde ning Tips.
Upcoming garden events
 
If you would like your organization's events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.
Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath have disrupted activities all along the Gulf coast and well inland. Before attending any event listed below, please contact the event organizers to ensure that it has not been cancelled, rescheduled, or relocated.
JANUARY

Hempstead: Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service of Waller County offers the 6th annual Master Gardener Class training. Most training will be held at the Extension Office, 846 6th St., Hempstead, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturdays starting January 6. Field trips are also scheduled to local horticulture venues. Speakers will be TAMU Extension Specialists as well as local Master Gardeners and horticulture business owners. The training covers topics such as Soils, Botany, Vegetables, Shrubs, Trees, Native Plants, Pathology (Diseases), Entomology (insects), Propagation, Turf Grass, and Landscape Design. In return for this training, participants are required to contribute at least 50 hours of volunteer service in Waller County during their training year for certification and graduation. More details can be found in the application packet. For those who enjoy gardening and horticulture, this program is a fun and educational way to broaden their knowledge base and meet others with similar interests. The cost of the program is $160 and includes a Master Gardener handbook, mandatory background check (volunteer screening) and class handouts. If two family members share a Master Gardener handbook, registration fee for both is $260 total, a $60 savings! Registration closes early December. For more information, call the Waller County Extension office at 979-826-7651 M-F, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. or email the Waller County Master Gardeners at wallermgardener2013@gmail.com. The application packet is also available at http://txmg.org/wallermg/classes.

La Marque: "Growing Avocado & Papaya": with Jerry Hurlbert, Moderator and Coordinator of Texas Rare Fruit Growers Assoc, presenting, 9-11 a.m., January 6, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (Hwy 519), La Marque. Pre-registration required: Ph 281-534-3413, email galvcountymgs@gmail.com ; for additional details visit www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html. Free.
 
La Marque: "Growing Peaches in Galveston County": with Galveston County Master Gardener Specialist Herman Auer presenting, 1-3:30 p.m., January 6, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (Hwy 519), La Marque. Pre-registration required: Ph 281-534-3413, email galvcountymgs@gmail.com; for additional details visit  www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html. Free.

Brenham: The Bluebonnet Master Gardeners will host an open house for prospective 2018 interns. Information about the 2018 BMGA Training Course will be provided January 9, from 11:30 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. at the Washington County sales Facility, 1305 E. Blue Bell Road, Brenham. For more information, call 979-865-2072.
 
Bellville: The Bluebonnet Master Gardeners will host an open house for prospective 2018 interns. Information about the BMGA Training Course will be provided January 11, from 10:00 a.m. until noon at the Austin County Extension Office, 20 South Holland, Bellville. The 2018 BMGA Training Course begins January 17 at the Austin County Extension Office in Bellville.
 
Houston: "Modern Roses for a Troubled Earth" is the topic of the Houston Rose Society meeting, January 11, 7:00 p.m. at the Cherie Flores Garden Pavillon, 1500 Hermann Drive, Houston. The parking lot is Lot C located at Hermann Drive and Crawford Street. The program will be presented by Lothar Behnke. Behnke has been an active member of the garden industry for more than 30y years. Currently he represents Weeks Roses, Simple Pleasures and Iseli Nursery under the ownership of Gardens Alive. He will speak on new Weeks rose introductions for 2018, focusing on Top Gun, a red rose claimed to have superior beauty and disease resistance. Free admission. For additional information, visit www.houstonrose.org.

La Marque: "Collection & Storage of Bud Wood for Grafting": with Galveston County Master Gardener Sue Jeffco presenting, 9-10 a.m., January 11, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (Hwy 519), La Marque. The presentation and demonstration will take place in the Galveston County Master Gardeners' Discovery Garden in Carbide Park. Pre-registration required: Ph 281-534-3413, email galvcountymgs@gmail.com; for additional details visit   www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html. Free.

Tyler: Master Gardeners at the Library, January 12, 11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m. "Make No Mistake, What Not to Do!" with Master Gardener Dee Bishop. Tyler Public Library, 201 S. College, Tyler. Free and open to the public. For additional information visit www.txmg.org/smith or call 903-590-2980.
 
La Marque: "Growing Great Tomatoes": with Galveston County Master Gardener Ira Gervais presenting 9-11 a.m., January 13, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (Hwy 519), La Marque. Pre-registration required: Ph 281-534-3413, email galvcountymgs@gmail.com; for additional details visit www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html. Free.
 
La Marque: "Kitchen Gardening": with Galveston County Master Gardener Mary Demeny presenting 1-3 p.m. , January 13, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (Hwy 519), La Marque. Pre-registration required: Ph 281-534-3413, email galvcountymgs@gmail.com; for additional details visit www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html. Free.
 
La Marque: "Square-foot Gardening": with Galveston County Master Gardener John Jons presenting, 6:30-8:30 p.m., January 16, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (Hwy 519), La Marque. Pre-registration required: Ph 281-534-3413, email galvcountymgs@gmail.com; for additional details visit www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html. Free.
 
La Marque: "Wedge Grafting": with Galveston County Master Gardener Sue Jeffco presenting, 9-10 a.m., January 18, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (Hwy 519), La Marque. The presentation and workshop will take place in the Galveston County Master Gardeners' Discovery Garden in Carbide Park. Pre-registration required: Ph 281-534-3413, email galvcountymgs@gmail.com; for additional details visit www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html. Free.

Hempstead: The Waller County Master Gardeners started accepting pre-orders on November 1 for their 2018 Fruit Tree (and more) Sale scheduled for Saturday, January 20. Three informational seminars about the varieties being offered are scheduled as follows: Nov. 2 from 10 a.m.-noon at the Waller County Extension Office, 846 6th St., Hempstead; Nov. 4 from 2 p.m.-4 p.m. at the Waller County Community Center, 21274 FM1098 Loop, Prairie View; Nov. 9 from 10 a.m.-noon at the Pattison Area Volunteer Fire Department Bldg., 2950 FM359, Pattison. For more information about the sale and these seminars, visit txmg.org/wallermg or call the Waller County Extension office at 979-826-7651.

La Marque: "Successful Spring Vegetables": with Galveston County Master Gardener Specialist Herman Auer presenting, 9-11:30 a.m., January 20, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (Hwy 519), La Marque. Pre-registration required: Ph 281-534-3413, email galvcountymgs@gmail.com ; for additional details visit www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html. Free.
 
La Marque: "Small Trees, Small Yards": with Galveston County Master Gardener Sandra Duvall presenting, 1-3:30 p.m., January 20, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (Hwy 519), La Marque. Pre-registration required: Ph 281-534-3413, email galvcountymgs@gmail.com; for additional details visit www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html. Free.
 
La Marque: "Garden Tool Talk": with Galveston County Master Gardeners Henry Harrison, III, and Tim Jahnke presenting, 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m., January 23, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (Hwy 519), La Marque. Pre-registration required: Ph 281-534-3413, email galvcountymgs@gmail.com; for additional details visit www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html. Free.
 
La Marque: "Growing & Using Herbs": with Fort Bend County Master Gardener and Coastal Prairie Texas Master Naturalist Tricia Bradbury presenting, 9-11:30 a.m., January 27, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (Hwy 519), La Marque. Pre-registration required: Ph 281-534-3413, email galvcountymgs@gmail.com; for additional details visit www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html. Free.
 
La Marque: "'Texas Tuff' Plants": with Galveston County Master Gardener Sandra Devall presenting, 1-3 p.m., January 27, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (Hwy 519), La Marque. Pre-registration required: Ph 281-534-3413, email galvcountymgs@gmail.com; for additional details visit  www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html. Free.
 
La Marque: "How to Grow Roses Successfully": with American Rose Society Master Rosarian and Galveston County Master Gardener John Jons presenting, 6:30-8:30 p.m., January 30, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (Hwy 519), La Marque. Pre-registration required: Ph 281-534-3413, email galvcountymgs@gmail.com; for additional details visit www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.html. Free.
FEBRUARY

Tyler:  Master Gardeners at the Library, February 9, 11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m. "Texas Tough! The History of the Texas Superstar Plant Program" with Texas Gardener Contributing Editor and Smith County Horticulture Agent Greg Grant. Tyler Public Library, 201 S. College, Tyler. Free and open to the public. For additional information visit  www.txmg.org/smith    or call 903-590-2980.

Hitchcock: "Galveston County Master Gardeners 2018 Spring Plant Sale," February 17, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., pre-sale seminar 8-8:50 a.m., Jack Brooks Park Rodeo Arena, 10 Jack Brooks Rd and Hwy 6, Hitchcock (Galveston County Fairgrounds).
Monthly meetings
 
If you would like your organization's events included in "Monthly Meetings" or would like to make a change to a listed meeting, please contact us at Monthly Meetings. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details. 
 
FIRST WEEK
  
Kaufman: The Kaufman County Master Gardeners meet the first Monday of each month at the First Community Church at 1401 Trinity Drive in Crandall. January through April and August and September meetings are at 9 a.m., with the remaining meetings beginning at 7 p.m. For additional information visit http://www.kcmga.org, call 972-932-9069 or email to sbburden@ag.tamu.edu.

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu
or call 281-855-5600.

Dallas: Garden Masters, Inc., meet the first Wednesday of each month at North Haven Gardens, 7700 Northaven Rd., Dallas. The club hosts different speaker each month from 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Bring your lunch! For more information, email Bunny Williams at bunny-williams@sbcglobal.net.
 
Kerrville: Hill Country Master Gardeners meet the first Wednesday of each month at 1:00 pm at Hill Country Youth Event Center, 3785 Hwy 27. For more information visit www.hillcountrymastergardeners.org.
 
Midland/Odessa: The Permian Basin Master Gardeners meet at noon, the first Wednesday of each month, lternating between the Midland and Ector County's Extensions Offices. For more information about location, call 432-498-4071 or 432-686-4700.

Navasota: The Navasota Garden Club meets on the first Wednesday of each month (September through May) at 10:00 a.m., usually at the First Baptist Church Family Life Center, 300 Church Street, Navasota. If not meeting at the church, a change of meeting notice will be placed on the door at the North entrance. Guests are welcome. Members are from Grimes County and surrounding counties.
   
Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Atlanta: The Cass County Master Gardeners meet the first Thursday of each month at the Atlanta Memorial Hospital Conference Room, State Highway 77 @ S. Williams St., Atlanta. A business meeting is followed by an educational program. The public is welcome to attend. For additional information, call 903-756-5391 or visit http://cass.agrilife.org

Fort Worth: The Native Plant Society of Texas - North Central Chapter meets the first Thursday of each month, excluding January and July, at the Fort Worth Botanic Garden, 3220 Botanic Garden Blvd., Fort Worth. Meeting begins at 6:30 p.m., program begins at 7:00 p.m. Guest speakers present educational programs on topics of interest. Members, friends, family, guests and the public are welcome. For a list of speakers and topics or more information, visit http://www.txnativeplants.org.
 
Hempstead: The Waller County Master Gardeners usually meet at 9 a.m. the first Thursday of each month at the Waller County AgriLife Extension Office, 846 6th St., Hempstead. For more information on the meeting schedule, visit http://txmg.org/wallermg or call 979-826-7651.
 
Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners hold their monthly meeting at noon on the first Thursday of each month at 623 Fair Street, Gonzales. Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or visit http://gonzalesmastergardeners.org for more information.

New Braunfels: The Comal Garden Club meets the first Thursday of each month at 9:30 a.m. at Southbank Clubhouse, 222 Southbank Blvd., New Braunfels.

Hempstead: The Peckerwood Garden Conservation Foundation, 20559 F.M. 359, Hempstead, hosts a special Peckerwood Insider's Tour at 10 a.m. on the first Saturday of each month. Spaces are limited so pre-registration is required. $15, free for members. For more information, visit http://www.peckerwoodgarden.org/explore/visit-peckerwood-garden/.
 
SECOND WEEK
 
Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of each month (except December) at the Austin Area Garden Center, 2220 Barton Springs Road, Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.austinorganicgardeners.org.

Jacksonville: The Cherokee County Master Gardeners meet on the second Monday of each month at 9:30 a.m. at Woodmen of the World, 1800 College Ave., Jacksonville. For more information, e-mail Tom Abbott at tom@deerfield-abbey.org.

Glen Rose: The Glen Rose Garden Club meets at 10 a.m. on the second Tuesday of each month (September through May) at the Somervell County Community Center in Glen Rose. For additional information, email stringer030@yahoo.com.

Glen Rose: The Prairie Rose Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets at 6 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Somerville County Citizen Center, 209 SW Barnard St., Glen Rose. For additional information, email prairierose.npsot@gmail.com
 
Harrison County: The Harrison County Master Gardeners meet on the second Tuesday of each month in the Harrison County Annex building, 102 W Houston St. (south side of the square), Marshall. Meetings are held in the 2nd floor AgriLife Extension meeting room. For more information, call 903-935-8413, or email wannagrow2@gmail.com.   
 
Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July, August and December at St. John's Lutheran Church in Marion. Directions to St. John's Lutheran Church: From FM 78 turn south onto FM 465 and the church is just past the Marion School on the right. From IH-10 go north on FM 465 towards Marion. The Church will be on the left, just before you get to town. A plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.
 
Quitman: The Quitman Garden Club meets at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Quitman Library on E Goode Street, Quitman. It is a diverse group that welcomes all visitors. For more information, e-mail quitmangardenclub@gmail.com.
 
Denton:  The Denton County Master Gardener Association meets from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. the
second Wednesday of each month . Meetings are open to the public. For complete details, visit  http://dcmga.com/.
 
Humble: The Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, hosts a Lunch Bunch the second Wednesday of each month from noon until 2 p.m. Take a sack lunch or order a box lunch from Starbucks when you call 281-443-8731 to reserve your spot. Master Gardeners and Masters Naturalists may earn CEU credits by attending.
 
Jacksboro: The Jacksboro Garden Club meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month (except June, July and August) at the Concerned Citizens Center, 400 East Pine Street, Jacksboro. For more information, call Melinda at 940-567-6218.
 
Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association's Learn at Lunch program meet the second Wednesday of each month. The business meeting begins at 11:30 a.m., with the program at noon, at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The program is presented for horticultural education and is free to the public. For further information call 903-236-8429, visit www.txmg.org/gregg, or like us on Facebook at Gregg County Master Gardeners. 
 
Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the
second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.or g and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.
 
Woodway: The McLennan County Master Gardeners meet on the second Wednesday each month at noon at the Carleen Bright Arboretum, 9001 Bosque Blvd., Woodway. Educational programs follow the business session. For more information, call 254-757-5180.
 
Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. (social) 7:00 (meeting) the second Thursday of each month except in July in the AgriLife Extension auditorium, 1225 Pearl 2nd floor (downtown Beaumont next to the Court House). For more information contact: 409-835-8461 or txmg.org/jcmg.
 
Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Kathy Henderson at kshend@verizon.net or visit http://www.npsot.org/wp/wilco.
 
Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the
second Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the new Orange County Expo Center on Hwy 1442 in Orangefield. Enter the building in the front entrance, first door on the right, Texas AgriLife offices. Pot luck supper at 6 p.m. Visit http://txmg.org/orange for more information.

Pasadena : The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the  second Thursday of each month  at The Genoa Friendship Garden Educational Building at 1202 Genoa Red Bluff, Pasadena. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu .

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Smithville: The Smithville Community Gardens meets at 5:30 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Smithville Recreation Center. 
 
Angleton: The Brazoria County Master Gardeners meet at 11 a.m. on the second Friday of each month at the Brazoria County Extension Office, 21017 County Road 171, Angleton. There is a general business meeting followed by a brief educational program each month. For further information call 979-864-1558, ext.110.
 
College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 a.m. in the training room of the College Station Waste Water Facility building at the end of North Forest Parkway, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.
 
Houston: The Spring Branch African Violet Club meets the second Saturday of each month, January through November, at 10:30am at the Copperfield Baptist Church, 8350 Highway 6 North, Houston. Call Karla at 281-748-8417 prior to attending to confirm meeting date and time.
  
Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1:30 p.m. on the second Saturday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.
 
Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member's homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.
 
THIRD WEEK
 
Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.
 
Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardener's meet on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W Henderson, Cleburne. Meeting times are at 2 p.m. October through April, except December and at 6 p.m. May through September. An educational program precedes the business meeting. For additional information, contact Sue Matern at 817-517-9076.
  
New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. the third Monday of each month (except April and December,) at the  GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For additional information, call 830-620-3440 or visit http://txmg.org/comal/. 

Texarkana: The Four Corners Chapter of Native Plant Society of Texas meets at 7 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at the Southwest Center, 3222 W. 7th St. (U.S. 67), Texarkana. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Belinda McCoy at 903-424-7724 or blackmtngardens@yahoo.com
 
Corpus Christi: The Nueces Master Gardeners meet at noon the third Tuesday of each month, except December, at Garden Senior Center, 5325 Greely Dr., Corpus Christi. An educational program precedes the business meeting. For further information call 361 767-5217.
 
Evant: The Evant Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m., usually at the bank in downtown Evant. To confirm the date, time and place of each month's meeting, call 254-471-5860. 
 
New Braunfels: The Lindheimer Chapter (Comal County) of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the third Tuesday of each month at  6:30 pm at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. Meetings include an informative speaker and a Plant of the Month presentation. Meetings are free and visitors are welcome. For more information,visit www.npsot.org/w/lindheimer Note : there will be no meeting in June or December.
 
Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 892 Airport Rd., Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.
 
Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Knights of Columbus Hall, 702 Burney Road, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.
 
Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.
 
Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.
 
Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.
 
Brownwood: Brownwood Garden Club meets the third Thursday of each month, 11:30 a.m.- 1 p.m.  The club meetings are at Southside Baptist Church, 1219 Indian Creek Road, with refreshments and a speaker presentation. Visitors are welcome. For more information, email boeblingen@centex.net or call 817-454-8175.
 
Hallettsville: The Hallettsville Garden Club meets at 2 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month from September through May, at the Hallettsville Garden and Cultural Center, 605 E 2nd St, Hallettsville. Each month, the club hosts speakers that provide informative programs on a wide range of gardening subjects, and refreshments are provided by member hostesses after the business meeting. Visitors are welcome. Please email Sharon Harrigan at sharonspetals@yahoo.com for more information.

Houston:
The Native Plant Society of Texas - Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) at the Houston SArboretum and Nature Center in Memorial Park (4501 Woodway Dr.). For more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http:/npsot.org/wp/Houston.

San Antonio: The Bexar County Master Gardeners (BCMG) meet on the third Thursday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension Office, 3355 Cherry Ridge Dr., Suite 208, San Antonio. During the months of Jan., March, May, July, Sep. and Nov., an evening meeting begins with a social time at 6 p.m. followed by a free presentation from 6:30-8:30 p.m. During the intervening months (Feb., April, June, Aug., Oct., Dec.), afternoon educational seminars/general meetings are held from 1-3:30 p.m. Check http://www.bexarmg.org/ to verify meeting date for any given month, as circumstances could require a change, and to find information on the speaker and topic scheduled for each meeting.
 
Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 6:30 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, at the AgriLife Building, 210 East Live Oak, Seguin. After a brief social hour, the meeting and guest speaker begins at 7 p.m. The meeting is free and open to the public. For additional information, call 830-303-3889 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

Hempstead: The Peckerwood Garden Conservation Foundation, 20559 F.M. 359, Hempstead, hosts the Evening at Peckerwood Lecture series at 7 p.m. on the third Friday of each month. Tickets are available online. Tickets are $10, $5 for members.For more information, visit http://www.peckerwoodgarden.org/explore/visit-peckerwood-garden/.

FOURTH WEEK
 
Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.
 
Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardeners, a program of Texas AgriLife Extension, meet the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. There is a public gardening program at each meeting and pertinent information may be found at brazosmg.com or 979-823-0129.
 
Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.
 
Linden: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the senior citizens building at 507 S Kaufman St. in Linden at 6:30. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Karen Tromza at khtromza@yahoo.com.
 
Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Deborah Beggs Moncrief Garden Center, 3220 Botanic Blvd., Ft. Worth. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.
 
San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or email npsot.sanantonio@gmail.com.
 
Houston: The Houston Native Prairie Association meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Wednesday of each month at the Cherie Flores Pavilion in McGovern Centennial Gardens at Hermann Park, 1500 Hermann Drive, Houston. For more information, contact hnpat@prairies.org.

Austin: The Garden Club of Austin meets at Zilker Botanical Gardens auditorium, 2220 Barton Springs Rd., Austin, at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month. 7:00-7:30 p.m. Refreshments and Social, followed by a presentation at 7:30 p.m. Free. For additional information, visit http://thegardenclubofaustin.org/.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the community room behind the Greater Texas Federal Credit Union,1300 N. Bell, Cedar Park, unless there is special event planned. Following a program and short business meeting, we share a pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call president Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email info@leandergc.org.
 
Dallas: The Dallas County Master Gardeners meet the fourth Thursday of each month at 11:30 a.m. For location and program information, visit h ttp://www.dallascountymastergardeners.org/ or contact The Helpdesk, M-F, 8 to 4:30 214-904-3053.
 
Dallas: The Greater Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the REI, 4515 LBJ Freeway, Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.gdogc.org.
  
Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817-483-7746.

Hempstead: The Peckerwood Garden Conservation Foundation, 20559 F.M. 359, Hempstead, holds an Open Day, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. on the fourth Saturday of each month. Tours start at 10 a.m. and the last tour leaves at 2 p.m. Tickets available online or at the gate. $10, free for members. For more information, visit http://www.peckerwoodgarden.org/explore/visit-peckerwood-garden/.
 
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Texas Gardener's Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2017. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

 

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener's Seeds, beginning with the first issue in April 2006, are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters.

 

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