February 8, 2017
  
Nine trends that will influence the gardening world in 2017

Monrovia 
 
From color-changing conifers to smaller-sized luxury looks, gardens wow with diverse palettes, global influences, and extreme naturalism in the new year.
 
Luxury garden elements that come in smaller packages, "floratourism," and the no-waste food movement's influence on the garden are all top gardening trends for 2017, reflecting a yin-yang sort of year in the gardening world.
 
"2017 will be a year of surprising contradictions," says Jonathan Pedersen, Plant Development Director at Monrovia. "Humble backyard edible gardens and no-fuss plants have never been so popular. At the same time, there's an increased level of sophistication in landscape design and a rising interest in unique plants with an emphasis on rich, saturated color and a sense of luxury."
 
Pedersen continued, "This year's trends are also breaking out of the garden, in a way. Globally, 'floratourism' is at an all-time high as travelers seek a respite in a stressful world. We're also seeing the issues of food security and climate change impact what and how home gardeners garden."
 
The top nine trends for 2017 are:
 
Smaller-sized luxury. As lot sizes shrink but the desire for the luxurious, traditional estate look grows, gardeners will snap up, in record numbers, a slew of new to the market, improved, scaled-down versions of iconic plants such as hydrangeas, roses, berries, conifers, and clematis. These easy-care plants are part of a larger "back to basics with a twist" trend we see unfolding.
 
Floratourism. New York's High Line is just the tip of the iceberg. Millennials may have grown up tethered to technology, but as a generation, they're reversing a decade-long trend by choosing nature as their recreational playground. Look for more record-shattering attendance figures at national parks, botanical gardens and arboretums worldwide.
 
Backyard gardening influenced by "no waste" food movement. With about one in three households now growing food, home gardeners, always on the leading edge of mindfulness, are poised to be a critical part of the solution to the urgent social and environmental issues of food waste, and the associated impacts on food security, food transport miles, wasted water, and depletion of arable land.
 
Color chameleons. Gardeners are seeking more seasonal change in their landscape, even from plants previously prized for consistent year-round beauty. Conifers that morph from shades of summery green to a rainbow of otherworldly hues in winter are leading the charge, selling out of nurseries nationwide. Expect to see a revival in the use of fuss-free conifers in general, and a boost in those that color-up for unexpected winter interest.
 
Extreme naturalism. In past years, gardeners have either embraced meadow-filled, freeform, wild gardens or, alternately, landscapes dominated by hard textures and right angles. In 2017, expect to see "extreme naturalism" with gardens that merge these aesthetics by introducing statement-making natural elements such as rocks, boulders, and beautifully untouched hedges that impose a more integrated sense of structure.
 
Climate adaptation. Interest in the possible effects of climate change on our landscapes has accelerated rapidly leading to a surge on a national rather than regional level in consumer demand for beautiful landscapes that also save water. Look for ramping-up of rainwater and greywater harvesting systems and more efficient irrigation.
 
Bright, bold colors. Even as more consumers look to their gardens for a respite from a stressful world, they're turning to celebratory color for the sense of vitality it brings, which is a major change from the popularity of last year's tranquil pinks and blues. While serene hues are not going anywhere, we see a pivot toward more saturated colors such as brilliant oranges, feverish reds, neon yellows, vivid purples, deep, dark reds, black-purples and lots of bi-colored versions.
 
One-pot wonders. Large pots filled with a single impressive statement plant are also on trend for 2017. Plant breeders have made this aesthetic easier to achieve thanks to boxwoods that don't require as much shearing, a number of reblooming, compact hydrangeas that only need nipping off of spent blossoms, and new varieties of pomegranates, lavenders, succulents, and berries that do exceptionally well in containers.
 
Tough and tender mixes. Talk about a return to old-school romance! In 2017, we'll see gardeners who spent the last decade loading up on "easy care," bullet-proof plants making room for more delicate specimens that imbue the space with heirloom charm, color, and fragrance. Keep an eye out for some perennial icing on shrub borders and more interest in Itoh peonies (which sold out in 2016) and wisteria even though they take work to maintain, have a short period of bloom, and can be pricey. Even in places like California where natives and xeriscaping are buzzy, people are finding ways to slip in a few of these beauties, if only in a pot or two.
Temperature swings and effects on vegetables
 
By Joe Masabni
Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Small-Acreage Vegetable Specialist
Overton Research and Extension Center
 
Daikon radish
Before I moved to Texas A&M, I spent 18 years in Michigan and six years in Kentucky. Over there, when it got cold, it stayed cold. You can plan your fall garden and rely on the weather to collaborate. In Michigan, we planted strawberries in the fall, the leaves froze over the winter, and plants regrew in the spring and had a bumper crop. Except for asparagus and rhubarb, no other vegetable is planted or is in the ground from September till May. In Kentucky, cool-season vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage and Brussel sprouts can grow through the winter with a little frost protection by using matted row cover such as Remay or Agribon.
Chinese celery

Now Texas weather is a whole new issue. Winters are milder, in most of Texas, and vegetables can be grown year-round, again in most of Texas. However, we all know that temperatures can be 75F one day, and 30F that same evening or the next day. The idea of "plant it and forget it" is not applicable in these conditions. Even the hardiest cool-season vegetables cannot tolerate these temperature swings. Cool-season vegetables can tolerate cold temperatures and continue grow at temperatures between 35-50F. However, they prefer a gradual temperature drop to adapt to the low temperatures. At warm temperatures, even cool-season vegetables will have tender and thin leaves not well adapted to colder temperatures.
Plants in the rosette stage
 
I have a first-hand experience dealing with these temperature swings. I am doing a trial evaluating Asian vegetables at Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Overton, Texas. I planted 18 varieties of a mixture of Daikon radish, bok choi, tatsoi, mache, dandelion, and Chinese celery. They were planted on November 3 and grew well. We had our first frost in mid-December when temperatures dipped to 19F. I harvested half the crop on December 21 and had great yields. Since then, temperatures have gone up to 77F and down to 18F on a roller coaster swing. On December 21, I harvested half the plants and kept the rest for harvest in January. The idea was to follow the growth of the plants and learn the ideal time for harvest in East Texas and whether plants will survive the temperature fluctuations.
Bok choi
 
The following are some initial observations based on the first harvest. Daikon radish grows really well in Texas. It's a shame we don't grow and eat more of it. If you love radish and hate the spicy after taste, then Daikon radish is your answer. Some roots were 12" long and as sweet as a cucumber. Just make sure you have a deep soil profile so that the roots can grow long. Otherwise, the root length is constricted by the hard pan below and roots start to curve. Chinese celery is another little-known crop. It tastes just like celery. The only difference is that Chinese celery doesn't produce long thick stalks like the celery we are familiar with. It is harvested at soil level and will regrow for multiple harvests. Leaves and stalks are all used in cooking and have a mild taste. However, Chinese celery couldn't handle the 18F temperatures and two out of the three varieties tested froze to the ground. In the future, I will grow in late winter for a spring harvest. Mache was not fazed by the low temperatures. Plants now are still in the rosette stage and I am sure they will grow large when temperatures warm up in the spring. Dandelion can tolerate low temperatures but not the temperature swings. Bok chois varied in their response to low temperatures but I did notice that red varieties appear to be more tolerant to low temperatures.
 
On January 17, all Asian vegetable varieties were completely dead, except for mache. For the future, I would recommend planting in early October at the latest so that plants are ready for harvest before the first killing frost.
 
Visit Joe Masabni's website on Aggie Horticulture to learn more about vegetable gardening (http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/vegetable/easy-gardening-series) or listen to recorded educational webinars at http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/smallacreage/webinars/.
Gardening tips

"I like the raised beds," Donna Migl writes. "We also use the 110-gallon watering tubs. We remove the plug and drill several holes around the bottom to make sure they drain well. We also put water faucets in a row down the middle of the garden in between the tubs to make it easier to water."

Have a favorite gardening tip you'd like to share? Texas Gardener's Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a copy of Texas Gardene r's 2017 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Garde ning Tips.
Upcoming garden events
 
If you would like your organization's events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.
FEBRUARY

Houston: "Growing Fruit Trees-Peaches and Plums" will be presented by by Galveston County Master Gardener Herman Auer 10-11:30 a.m., Thursday, February 9, at Genoa Friendship Garden Education Building, 1202 Genoa Red Bluff Rd., Houston. For additional information, visit https://hcmga.tamu.edu.

Houston:  "Rose Pruning Done Right" will be the topic of the Houston Rose Society meeting on Thursday, February 9, 7:30 p.m. at St. Andrews Episcopal Church 1819 Heights Blvd., Houston. Entrance to the parking lot is on W. 19th Street near Yale St. Expert rosarians with the Houston Rose Society will demonstrate pruning techniques on actual bushes of all types of roses. Tables will be placed so all can get a close-up view of the demonstration. Questions are encouraged. Added bonus: all pruned bushes will be given away as door prizes; obtain a free raffle ticket upon arrival to be eligible. Our special guest this evening will be Jon Corkern, Director of Development and Membership of the American Rose Society. Free admission. For more information, visit: http://www.houstonrose.org.

San Antonio: Scott Tompkins will present "Herbal Salad Dressings" at the February 9 meeting of the San Antonio Herb Society. Tompkins is the Culinary Development Manager for Recipes/Products for HEB headquarters. Tompkins was classically trained at culinary schools in Los Angeles and Austin and worked at some of the top restaurants. Tompkins has been with HEB for 5-1/2 years, starting as a culinary instructor, advancing to a recipe developer, a technical food advisor and culinary captain before receiving his current senior position. You may have seen Tompkins on the HEB Backyard Kitchen program on KSAT. Tompkins focuses on healthier and down to earth recipes that fit today's lifestyles. Foods that allow natural flavors to come through. He also develops frozen and fresh products for HEB. Tompkins plans on presenting a salad to taste test and will demonstrate a series of herbal related dressings. This informative and fun meeting is free and open to the public. The San Antonio Herb Society meets on the second Thursday of the month at the San Antonio Garden Center at 6:30pm. The Garden Center is located at 3310 N. New Braunfels. For more information about the herb society go to www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Tyler: Smith County Master Gardeners at the library, February 10 at 11:30 a.m. "Rose Rustlers" with Greg Grant, Smith County horticulturalist and Texas Gardener contributing editor . Presentation with Q&A to follow. Tyler Public Library, 201 S. College, Tyler. Free and open to the public. For additional information, call 903-590-2980.

Angleton: Brazoria County Master Gardeners will hold their 11th Annual Fruit & Citrus Tree Sale, 8:00-noon, February 11, at the Brazoria County Fair Grounds, 901 South Downing, Angleton. More than 1,400 individual plants will be available. For additional information, visit http://txmg.org/brazoria or http://brazoria.agrilife.org

La Marque: "Growing Avocado & Papaya" with Jerry Hurlbert, Moderator & Coordinator of the Texas Rare Fruit Growers Assoc. presenting, 9:00-11:30 a.m., February 11, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Building in Carbide Park, 4102-B Main St., La Marque; Ph 281-534-3413; email reservations to galvcountymgs@gmail.com, further details see http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/. Free.

La Marque: "Soil Health & Evaluation" with GC Master Gardener Jim Gilliam presenting, 1:00-2:30 p.m., February 11, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Building in Carbide Park, 4102-B Main St., La Marque; Ph 281-534-3413; email reservations to galvcountymgs@gmail.com, further details see http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/. Free.

San Antonio: "Pruning Roses - for Beautiful Blooms" will be presented at 7:00 p.m., Monday, February 13, at San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 North New Braunfels, San Antonio. Consulting Rosarians Meg Ware and Murray Warner will provide a "hands-on" demonstration of proper pruning techniques and show you how to prune the different types of roses (hybrid teas, grandifloras, floribundas, shrubs, OGRs, miniatures and mini floras). Some basic principles apply to all types of roses; however, some require special considerations. We are set to prune the roses at the Botanical Gardens on February 15, 9:00 a.m. noon. This is a hands-on pruning clinic with instructions and demonstration. Bring heavy leather gloves and sharp hand-pruning shears, and comfortable work clothes. For additional information, visit https://www.facebook.com/SanAntonioRoseSociety/.

Marion: The Guadalupe Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas presents "Why Vines?" at 7:00 p.m., February 14, at St. John's Lutheran Church, FM 465, Marion. For additional information, visit http://npsot.org/wp/guadalupe.

Woodway: Sandy Katz , Master Gardener, will present "Using Earthkind Plants in a Home Landscape Design " at noon, February 15, Carleen Bright Arboretum, 1 Pavilion Way, Woodway. For more information, call 254-399-9204 or email jschaffer@woodwaymail.org.

La Marque: "Pruning Roses" with GC Master Gardener, Consulting Rosarian, and American Rose Society member John Jons presenting, 9:00-10:00 a.m., February 16, at Galveston County Master Gardeners' Research & Demonstration Garden in Carbide Park, 4102 Main St., La Marque; Ph 281-534-3413; email reservations to galvcountymgs@gmail.com, further details see http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/. Free.

San Antonio: Rosarian Ed Bradley will present "Roses for 2017," Thursday, February 16, 1-3 p.m., at 3355 Cherry Ridge, San Antonio. Free. Bexar County Master Gardener (BCMG) Educational Seminars/General Meetings are held on the afternoon of the third Thursday every other month at the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Office, Suite 208. Bradley will share his expertise his wealth of knowledge on growing roses in San Antonio. For more information email President@bexarmg.org, or call 210-699-0663.

Seguin: Thursday, February 16 at 7:00 pm Guadalupe County Master Gardeners will meet at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. Joe Urbach, a Hays County Master Gardener who has written several books on gardening, will present "Phytonutrient Gardening". Sure, you know how nutritious raising your own food is, but Urbach takes you back to how that happened, how certain varieties are more nutritious than others and how that came to be. A fascinating history of some of the foods we eat, how to get the most nutrition from them, and which to eat for certain health conditions. Free. Open to the public. For more information, visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

Houston : "Daylily Sale" offered by Lone Star Daylily Society at the Texas Home & Garden Show February 17-19 at the NRG Center, 1 NRG Park, Houston. Times for the sale are Feb 17, 2 p.m.-7 p.m.; Feb 18, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; and Feb 19, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Offering 55 varieties, ranging from oldie-goldies, to newer releases by well-known hybridizers, such as Bell, DeVito and Trimmer. Prices range from $5-$12. For more information, visit lonestardaylilysociety.org and see a copy of our color flyer to see samples of what you can expect to find. Any questions, call Debbie Pike at 979-236-1478.

Hitchcock: "Galveston County Master Gardeners 2017 Spring Plant Sale" with pre-sale seminar 8:00 a.m.-8:50 a.m., plant sale 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., February 18, at Jack Brooks Park Rodeo Arena, 10 Jack Brooks Rd and Hwy 6, Hitchcock (Galveston County Fairgrounds).

Kaufman: Kaufman County Master Gardeners host Home Landscape Design, Saturday, February 18. Dr. Whitney Griffin of Texas A&M University in College Station will discuss landscape design principles, plant selection criteria and landscape maintenance. She will also discuss living walls and green roofs and how they can be incorporated into a landscape design. The seminar will be held at Grace Christian Church, 504 S. Houston Street, Kaufman. Registration, the silent auction, the plant sale and vendor booths open at 8:30 a.m. The program begins at 9:00 a.m. and ends at noon. Light refreshments will be provided. The cost is $15 per person. For more information, call 972-932-9069 or go to kcmga.org

La Marque: "Galveston County Master Gardeners Annual Spring Fruit & Citrus Tree, Vegetable, 'Texas Tough' Perennials, Bulb, and Craft Sale," 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., February 18; pre-sale seminar 8:00 a.m.-8:50 a.m., at Jack Brooks Park Rodeo Arena, 10 Jack Brooks Rd and Hwy 6, Hitchcock (Galveston County Fairgrounds) For a complete list of plants included in the Sale, visit aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/Galveston/index.htm.

Pasadena: Harris County Master Gardener "Fruit Tree and Tomato" Sale will be held February 18 at Campbell Hall, Pasadena Fairgrounds, 7600 Red Bluff RD., Pasadena. For more information, visit https://hcmga.tamu.edu .

Smithson Valley: The Lindheimer Chapter (Comal County) of the Native Plant Society of Texas will hold their monthly meeting on February 21 at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, Smithson Valley. The doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the meeting starts at 7:00 p.m. The speaker will be Kathryn Bryant, Management Chair, Lindheimer Chapter Plant Sale. Kathryn will speak on "Plant Sale Primer." Kathryn will review native plants of interest for the sale and propagation techniques. The meeting is free and the public is welcome. For more information, call Martha Guethle, 830-438-5996.

Bryan: Brazos County Master Gardeners will present "Blue is the New Gold," a water conservation program, February 25, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., at Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. Learn methods to efficiently manage your outdoor use of this limited natural resource! Experts will give information and guidance related to rainwater harvesting, efficient home irrigation systems, how soils capture water and plant selection to conserve water. John Ferguson , owner of Nature's Way Resources (NWR), Conroe, will present "Soil, Your Ultimate Water Reservoir" in which he will discuss how soils capture and use water for low maintenance and environmentally friendly landscapes. 9:30-10:30 a.m. Dr. Dotty Woodson, a water resource program specialist at the Dallas Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center, will present "Rainwater Harvesting" and "Irrigation Efficiency," covering rainwater collection for irrigation, provide mathematical formula for rainwater collection, design ideas, filtration options, irrigation pressure issues, efficient irrigation methods and prevention of cross contamination. 10:45-11:45 a.m. and 12:15 to 1:15 p.m. Amy Uyen Truong, an extension assistant with the Texas Water Resources Institute and the Institute of Renewable Natural Resources, will present "The Drought Survivability of 97 Ornamental Landscape Species," in which she discusses how drought-prone areas can benefit from ambitious landscaping strategies to allow consumers to properly manage their outdoor water use. 1:30-2:30 p.m. Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer gardening questions. $45 per person. Visit brazosmg.com for registration form and additional information.
MARCH

Galveston: The Friends of Moody Gardens will host the 5th annual Gulf Coast Herb Fair and Luncheon on Wednesday, March 1, in the Visitors Pyramid at Moody Gardens, 1 Hope Blvd, Galveston. The featured speaker during the luncheon will be Alicia Cahill, owner of The Kitchen Chick. Activities being planned include exciting vendors in the Visitors Pyramid, a Garden Blessing accompanied by music and the story of the Tussey Mussey, plus a lovely luncheon for $35/pp. Checks can be sent to Ellen Perry, 2903 Dominque Drive, TX 77551. For more information, phone 409-740-6842 or email e.l.perry@att.net. For additional information, visit https://files.acrobat.com/a/preview/f706afb5-3856-4a07-8ce2-9223dd12981b.

Austin: Locally raised heirloom veggies and herbs make their big debut 9 a.m. at Sunshine Community Garden (SCG), 4814 Sunshine Dr., Austin, March 4. The sale is the largest Certified Organic Non-Profit Plant event in Texas. More than 150 tomato varieties, 72 wicked hot and sweet bell pepper varieties, 15 kinds of eggplants, 5,000 herbs and other plants ready for spring planting. The first bite of a delicious and juicy home grown organic tomato will make you beg for more. Improve your health with regular gardening exercise. Save big money by growing your own organic vegetables. For complete list of plants on sale and varieties to grow visit http://www.sunshinecommunitygarden.org/.

Tyler: Smith County Master Gardeners at the library, March 10 at 11:30 a.m. "Azaleas: New, Old, Native, and Exotic," with Keith Hansen, retired Smith County Horticulture Extension Agent. Presentation with Q&A to follow. Tyler Public Library, 201 S. College, Tyler. Free and open to the public. For additional information, call 903-590-2980.
 
Orangefield: The Orange County Master Gardeners are having their 4th Annual Bloomin' Crazy Plant Fair Saturday, March 18, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. at Cormier Park, 8235 FM 1442, Orangefield. Hundreds of nursery and member-grown plants will be for sale, including many varieties of citrus, stone fruit, berries, cold-hardy avocados, LSU gold & purple figs, Texas Superstars, perennials, natives, annuals, house and tropicals along with succulents, lilies and many other hard to find and unusual plants. Plant specialists and members will be available to answer questions and help you select your plants. Specialty booths will be set up with unique gardening items. For more information, visit http://txmg.org/orange.
Monthly meetings
 
If you would like your organization's events included in "Monthly Meetings" or would like to make a change to a listed meeting, please contact us at Monthly Meetings. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details. 
 
FIRST WEEK
  
Kaufman: The Kaufman County Master Gardeners meet the first Monday of each month at the First Community Church at 1401 Trinity Drive in Crandall. January through April and August and September meetings are at 9 a.m., with the remaining meetings beginning at 7 p.m. For additional information visit http://www.kcmga.org, call 972-932-9069 or email to sbburden@ag.tamu.edu.

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu
or call 281-855-5600.

Dallas: Garden Masters, Inc., meet the first Wednesday of each month at North Haven Gardens, 7700 Northaven Rd., Dallas. The club hosts different speaker each month from 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Bring your lunch! For more information, email Bunny Williams at bunny-williams@sbcglobal.net.
 
Kerrville: Hill Country Master Gardeners meet the first Wednesday of each month at 1:00 pm at Hill Country Youth Event Center, 3785 Hwy 27. For more information visit www.hillcountrymastergardeners.org.
 
Midland/Odessa: The Permian Basin Master Gardeners meet at noon, the first Wednesday of each month, lternating between the Midland and Ector County's Extensions Offices. For more information about location, call 432-498-4071 or 432-686-4700.
   
Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Atlanta: The Cass County Master Gardeners meet the first Thursday of each month at the Atlanta Memorial Hospital Conference Room, State Highway 77 @ S. Williams St., Atlanta. A business meeting is followed by an educational program. The public is welcome to attend. For additional information, call 903-756-5391 or visit http://cass.agrilife.org
 
Hempstead: The Waller County Master Gardeners usually mee tat 9 a.m. the first Thursday of each month at the Waller County AgriLife Extension Office, 846 6th St., Hempstead. For more information on the meeting schedule, visit http://txmg.org/wallermg or call 979-826-7651.

Fort Worth: The North Central Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets the first Thursday of each month at 6:30 p.m. except (January and July) in the Fort Worth Botanical Garden Building at  3220 Botanic Garden Boulevard, Fort Worth. For additional information, contact President Theresa Thomas at kayleetl@sbcglobal.net.
 
Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners hold their monthly meeting at noon on the first Thursday of each month at 623 Fair Street, Gonzales. Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or visit http://gonzalesmastergardeners.org for more information.

New Braunfels: The Comal Garden Club meets the first Thursday of each month at 9:30 a.m. at Southbank Clubhouse, 222 Southbank Blvd., New Braunfels.

Hempstead: The Peckerwood Garden Conservation Foundation, 20559 F.M. 359, Hempstead, hosts a special Peckerwood Insider's Tour at 10 a.m. on the first Saturday of each month. Spaces are limited so pre-registration is required. $15, free for members. For more information, visit http://www.peckerwoodgarden.org/explore/visit-peckerwood-garden/.
 
SECOND WEEK
 
Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of each month (except December) at the Austin Area Garden Center, 2220 Barton Springs Road, Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.austinorganicgardeners.org.

Jacksonville: The Cherokee County Master Gardeners meet on the second Monday of each month at 9:30 a.m. at Woodmen of the World, 1800 College Ave., Jacksonville. For more information, e-mail Tom Abbott at tom@deerfield-abbey.org.

Glen Rose: The Glen Rose Garden Club meets at 10 a.m. on the second Tuesday of each month (September through May) at the Somervell County Community Center in Glen Rose. For additional information, email stringer030@yahoo.com.

Glen Rose: The Prairie Rose Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets at 6 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Somerville County Citizen Center, 209 SW Barnard St., Glen Rose. For additional information, email prairierose.npsot@gmail.com
 
Harrison County: The Harrison County Master Gardeners meet on the second Tuesday of each month in the Harrison County Annex building, 102 W Houston St. (south side of the square), Marshall. Meetings are held in the 2nd floor AgriLife Extension meeting room. For more information, call 903-935-8413, or email wannagrow2@gmail.com.   
 
Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July, August and December at St. John's Lutheran Church in Marion. Directions to St. John's Lutheran Church: From FM 78 turn south onto FM 465 and the church is just past the Marion School on the right. From IH-10 go north on FM 465 towards Marion. The Church will be on the left, just before you get to town. A plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.
 
Quitman: The Quitman Garden Club meets at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Quitman Library on E Goode Street, Quitman. It is a diverse group that welcomes all visitors. For more information, e-mail quitmangardenclub@gmail.com.
 
Denton:  The Denton County Master Gardener Association meets from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. the
second Wednesday of each month . Meetings are open to the public. For complete details, visit  http://dcmga.com/.
 
Humble: The Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, hosts a Lunch Bunch the second Wednesday of each month from noon until 2 p.m. Take a sack lunch or order a box lunch from Starbucks when you call 281-443-8731 to reserve your spot. Master Gardeners and Masters Naturalists may earn CEU credits by attending.
 
Jacksboro: The Jacksboro Garden Club meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month (except June, July and August) at the Concerned Citizens Center, 400 East Pine Street, Jacksboro. For more information, call Melinda at 940-567-6218.
 
Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association's Learn at Lunch program meet the second Wednesday of each month. The business meeting begins at 11:30 a.m., with the program at noon, at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The program is presented for horticultural education and is free to the public. For further information call 903-236-8429, visit www.txmg.org/gregg, or like us on Facebook at Gregg County Master Gardeners. 
 
Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the
second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.or g and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.
 
Woodway: The McLennan County Master Gardeners meet on the second Wednesday each month at noon at the Carleen Bright Arboretum, 9001 Bosque Blvd., Woodway. Educational programs follow the business session. For more information, call 254-757-5180.
 
Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. (social) 7:00 (meeting) the second Thursday of each month except in July in the AgriLife Extension auditorium, 1225 Pearl 2nd floor (downtown Beaumont next to the Court House). For more information contact: 409-835-8461 or txmg.org/jcmg.
 
Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Kathy Henderson at kshend@verizon.net or visit http://www.npsot.org/wp/wilco.
 
Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the
second Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the new Orange County Expo Center on Hwy 1442 in Orangefield. Enter the building in the front entrance, first door on the right, Texas AgriLife offices. Pot luck supper at 6 p.m. Visit http://txmg.org/orange for more information.
 
San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Smithville: The Smithville Community Gardens meets at 5:30 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Smithville Recreation Center. 
 
Angleton: The Brazoria County Master Gardeners meet at 11 a.m. on the second Friday of each month at the Brazoria County Extension Office, 21017 County Road 171, Angleton. There is a general business meeting followed by a brief educational program each month. For further information call 979-864-1558, ext.110.
 
College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 a.m. in the training room of the College Station Waste Water Facility building at the end of North Forest Parkway, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.
 
Houston: The Spring Branch African Violet Club meets the second Saturday of each month, January through November, at 10:30am at the Copperfield Baptist Church, 8350 Highway 6 North, Houston. Call Karla at 281-748-8417 prior to attending to confirm meeting date and time.
  
Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1:30 p.m. on the second Saturday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.
 
Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member's homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.
 
THIRD WEEK
 
Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.
 
Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardener's meet on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W Henderson, Cleburne. Meeting times are at 2 p.m. October through April, except December and at 6 p.m. May through September. An educational program precedes the business meeting. For additional information, contact Sue Matern at 817-517-9076.
  
New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. the third Monday of each month (except April and December,) at the  GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For additional information, call 830-620-3440 or visit http://txmg.org/comal/ .

Texarkana: The Four Corners Chapter of Native Plant Society of Texas meets at 7 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at the Southwest Center, 3222 W. 7th St. (U.S. 67), Texarkana. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Belinda McCoy at 903-424-7724 or blackmtngardens@yahoo.com.
 
Corpus Christi: The Nueces Master Gardeners meet at noon the third Tuesday of each month, except December, at Garden Senior Center, 5325 Greely Dr., Corpus Christi. An educational program precedes the business meeting. For further information call 361 767-5217.
 
Evant: The Evant Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m., usually at the bank in downtown Evant. To confirm the date, time and place of each month's meeting, call 254-471-5860. 
 
New Braunfels: The Lindheimer Chapter (Comal County) of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the third Tuesday of each month at  6:30 pm at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. Meetings include an informative speaker and a Plant of the Month presentation. Meetings are free and visitors are welcome. For more information,visit www.npsot.org/w/lindheimer Note : there will be no meeting in June or December.
 
Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 892 Airport Rd., Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.
 
Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Knights of Columbus Hall, 702 Burney Road, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.
 
Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.
 
Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.
 
Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.
 
Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.
 
Brownwood: Brownwood Garden Club meets the third Thursday of each month, 11:30 a.m.- 1 p.m.  The club meetings are at Southside Baptist Church, 1219 Indian Creek Road, with refreshments and a speaker presentation. Visitors are welcome. For more information, email boeblingen@centex.net or call 817-454-8175.
 
Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas - Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) at the Houston SArboretum and Nature Center in Memorial Park (4501 Woodway Dr.). For more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http:/npsot.org/wp/Houston.

San Antonio: The Bexar County Master Gardeners (BCMG) meet on the third Thursday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension Office, 3355 Cherry Ridge Dr., Suite 208, San Antonio. During the months of Jan., March, May, July, Sep. and Nov., an evening meeting begins with a social time at 6 p.m. followed by a free presentation from 6:30-8:30 p.m. During the intervening months (Feb., April, June, Aug., Oct., Dec.), afternoon educational seminars/general meetings are held from 1-3:30 p.m. Check http://www.bexarmg.org/ to verify meeting date for any given month, as circumstances could require a change, and to find information on the speaker and topic scheduled for each meeting.
 
Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 6:30 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, at the AgriLife Building, 210 East Live Oak, Seguin. After a brief social hour, the meeting and guest speaker begins at 7 p.m. The meeting is free and open to the public. For additional information, call 830-303-3889 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

Hempstead: The Peckerwood Garden Conservation Foundation, 20559 F.M. 359, Hempstead, hosts the Evening at Peckerwood Lecture series at 7 p.m. on the third Friday of each month. Tickets are available online. Tickets are $10, $5 for members.For more information, visit http://www.peckerwoodgarden.org/explore/visit-peckerwood-garden/.

FOURTH WEEK
 
Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.
 
Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardeners, a program of Texas AgriLife Extension, meet the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. There is a public gardening program at each meeting and pertinent information may be found at brazosmg.com or 979-823-0129.
 
Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.
 
Linden: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the senior citizens building at 507 S Kaufman St. in Linden at 6:30. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Karen Tromza at khtromza@yahoo.com.
 
Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Deborah Beggs Moncrief Garden Center, 3220 Botanic Blvd., Ft. Worth. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.
 
San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or email npsot.sanantonio@gmail.com.
 
Houston: The Houston Native Prairie Association meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Wednesday of each month at the Cherie Flores Pavilion in McGovern Centennial Gardens at Hermann Park, 1500 Hermann Drive, Houston. For more information, contact hnpat@prairies.org.

Austin: The Garden Club of Austin meets at Zilker Botanical Gardens auditorium, 2220 Barton Springs Rd., Austin, at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month. 7:00-7:30 p.m. Refreshments and Social, followed by a presentation at 7:30 p.m. Free. For additional information, visit http://thegardenclubofaustin.org/.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the community room behind the Greater Texas Federal Credit Union,1300 N. Bell, Cedar Park, unless there is special event planned. Following a program and short business meeting, we share a pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call president Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email info@leandergc.org.
 
Dallas: The Dallas County Master Gardeners meet the fourth Thursday of each month at 11:30 a.m. For location and program information, visit h ttp://www.dallascountymastergardeners.org/ or contact The Helpdesk, M-F, 8 to 4:30 214-904-3053.
 
Dallas: The Greater Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the REI, 4515 LBJ Freeway, Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.gdogc.org.
  
Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817-483-7746.

Hempstead: The Peckerwood Garden Conservation Foundation, 20559 F.M. 359, Hempstead, holds an Open Day, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. on the fourth Saturday of each month. Tours start at 10 a.m. and the last tour leaves at 2 p.m. Tickets available online or at the gate. $10, free for members. For more information, visit http://www.peckerwoodgarden.org/explore/visit-peckerwood-garden/.
 
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