November 1, 2017
  
The garden reader:
Down-to-earth plant advice for outside and inside
 
By William Scheick
 
Sally Nex. Growing Self-Sufficiency: Realize Your Dream and Enjoy Producing Your Own Fruit, Vegetables, Eggs and Meat. Green Books, 2017. 239 pp. $24.99.

"I yearned for the kind of space where I could grow whole meals from the garden," Sally Nex recalls. This dream was easier to realize than she had first thought and has now even resulted in an abundantly illustrated handbook.
 
"Trust yourself," she advises. "Just try out one, or more, of the adventures into self-sufficiency I outline in this book, with no other changes in your life, and you will discover your own ability to provide for yourself."
 
Nex's down-to-earth recommendations include starting with readily grown veggies raised seasonally as well as designing a "three-pot veg plot" and herb garden. She also offers guidance on how to expand a garden over time and also on how to save seed and preserve produce.
 
Besides reliable practical advice, Nex provides nifty little insights, such as how to grow straight carrots, utilize rice to dry seed and deploy a water barrier beneath a potted plant to thwart slugs.
 
David Squire. Houseplant Handbook. Fox Chapel Publishing, 2017. 224 pp. $19.99.

Plenty of key practical advice informs David Squire's Houseplant Handbook. His book opens with thoughts on how to select suitable houseplants, appropriate containers and potting media.
 
It then considers watering, misting, feeding, repotting and grooming. The discussion next moves to propagating plants by seed, cutting, dividing and layering.
 
Most of this brightly illustrated handbook features plant profiles, with attention to height, spread, seasonal requirements and propagation. Here you will learn, among other facts, the difference between Christmas cactus ( Schlumbergera x buckleyi) and crab cactus ( S. truncata).
 
Still on my wish list: a detailed chapter that helps homeowners to calculate the houseplant-impact of various types of new energy-efficient windows. Reflective and/or tinted glass decreases light transmission as much as 40 percent, an alteration presumably challenging the welfare of some standard houseplants situated on or beside today's windowsills.
 
William Scheick is a Texas Gardener contributing editor and the author of   Adventures in Texas Gardening
(Texas A&M University Press).
Plant-based essential oils boost the mind, body & spirit during the holidays

By Melinda Myers

Ease into the hectic holiday season with the help of aromatherapy. The fragrances of plant-derived essential oils have long been used to improve the health of our mind, body and spirit.
 
Boost your energy and increase your focus as you work to balance work, family and holiday fun. Peppermint has long been prized for this and so much more. You'll find it also helps relieve headaches and indigestion.
 
Freshen your home with the scent of grapefruit. It's the perfect solution when unexpected guests drop by for a visit. You may also find the grapefruit aroma, along with your company, help to lighten your mood.
 
Use eucalyptus essential oil in the fight against colds and flu this winter. Just place a few drops into a diffuser on your desk at work, in your bedroom or family room. The diffusers come in a wide array of shapes and sizes. Some use heat, ultrasonic vibrations, fans or wood wicks to disperse the fragrance throughout the room. Others, like the Eden Aroma Diffuser, allow the fragrance to seep through the porous portion of the diffuser pot and into the room.
 
Or use a eucalyptus eye mask to help relieve sinus pressure and sooth tired eyes. Just gently heat or cool the mask, cover your eyes and relax into a bit of relief.
 
Encourage a good night's sleep by tucking a lavender-filled sachet under your pillow. Or set a bundle of dried lavender stems in the bathroom, bedroom or anywhere you want to enjoy the fragrance of a summer garden and a bit of relaxation.
 
When you incorporate some aromatherapy into your routine you'll find yourself smiling and more relaxed. The boost in energy and reduced stress will help you navigate the many gatherings, rich food and busy schedules ahead. And consider giving the gift of aromatherapy to someone you love, so they too can enjoy improved harmony and health into the New Year.
 
Melinda Myers has written more than 20 gardening books, including Small Space Gardening. She hosts The Great Courses "How to Grow Anything: Food Gardening For Everyone" DVD set and the nationally syndicated Melinda's Garden Moment TV & radio segments. Myers is a columnist and contributing editor for Birds & Blooms magazine. Myers's web site is www.melindamyers.com.
Spectroscopy: Simple solution for soil sample
 
Soil Science Society
 
Farmers and gardeners know their soil texture can make a big difference in their success. Different plants have different needs for water, nutrients, and air. When they grow in soil that has the right texture, it is easier to deliver the right amount of water, fertilizer, or pesticide to the plants. Then they grow better.
 
Traditional ways of analyzing soil texture are slow. Danish researchers have shown a new, high-tech method that is fast, cost-effective, and portable. This technique could make it much easier to understand the soil texture of a particular area - or even large areas across the globe.
 
Soil texture is one of the most basic soil properties we can measure. Soil is made up of a combination of very small pieces, or particles, of minerals. It can also contain particles of organic matter from plants and animals. Mineral particles are grouped into three categories according to their size:
  • The smallest particles are classified as clay. These microscopically tiny particles look like fine powder. They have a reactive surface area that can hold water, nutrients, and salts.
  • The particles in the next group, called silt, are not quite as small. They still look like powder but are not nearly as reactive as clay.
  • The largest particles are sand. You can see individual sand particles with the naked eye. Sand has no reactive surface area, so it absorbs no water or nutrients.
How much of the soil is clay, silt, and sand defines the soil texture. The texture determines how loosely or densely the soil is packed. It also affects how fast water will drain from the soil after it rains. Some crops might prefer a soil mainly made of sand. Some crops might prefer a higher content of clay.
 
The research group included scientists who specialized in different areas of soil science. Soil physics and geology have different ways of defining the limiting sizes for the clay and silt fractions - that is, what size ranges of particles are considered clay or silt. "This can lead to confusion when those sciences try to work together," said soil scientist Cecilie Hermansen of Aarhus University. So the researchers came up with a way to overcome this issue. They tried using a technology that was already being used to study other properties of soil.
 
Visible near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (vis-NIRS, for short) is a way of measuring activity in the visible range and just beyond. The vis-NIRS sensors can reveal differences in particle sizes due to the way they scatter light. The research team found that vis-NIRS can provide detailed soil texture measurements that do not depend on the definitions different scientists use to describe clay, silt, and sand.
 
Let's go back to how this can help a farmer or gardener. The relative amounts of clay, silt, and sand in the soil can vary a lot on a single plot of land. With portable vis-NIRS sensors, Hermansen said, multiple soil samples can be taken and analyzed quickly, right in the field. "A landscape manager might want to grow a wide variety of plant species across a public park," she noted. "A map illustrating the different soil types can help the gardener choose the best plant species for different locations in the park."
 
The scale of this technology is still growing. One day, airborne and spaceborne sensors may be able to generate data to map detailed soil properties, including soil texture, across the globe.
 
Hermansen collaborated with a team of scientists from Aarhus University and Aalborg University. Their work is published in the Soil Science Society of America Journal.
Gardening tips

"In the fall, the day before, or morning of trash pickup day," writes Cason, "I'd go around my neighborhood and (if the yard looked healthy) pick up their garbage bags full of leaves that were set out by the curb. Then I'd bring them home and set the bags in tight rows in my garden plot. The leaves 'fermented' in the bags and the bags helped cut down on winter weeds popping up. Then when ready to prepare for my spring garden I'd dump the bags and mix the leaves into the soil. Sometimes I'd find a toy soldier, a Lego or a string of Christmas lights. As I was getting 'free' mulch that helped me and kept it out of the land fill, a Lego or a bur oak acorn were no bother. All was good."   
 
Have a favorite gardening tip you'd like to share? Texas Gardener's Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a copy of Texas Gardene r's 2018 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Garde ning Tips.
Upcoming garden events
 
If you would like your organization's events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.
Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath have disrupted activities all along the Gulf coast and well inland. Before attending any event listed below, please contact the event organizers to ensure that it has not been cancelled, rescheduled, or relocated.
NOVEMBER

Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardeners present an Arbor Day Observation at 9:30 a.m., Friday, November 3, at the Brazos County Extension Office, 2619 Highway 21 W. Bryan. Jeff Lehde and Zaina Gates, Certified Master Arborists, will present a tree pruning and planting demonstration. Visit http://www.brazosmg.com for additional information.  
 
Grand Prairie: The Texas Arbor Day Celebration is being held in the City of Grand Prairie at 10:00 a.m., Friday, Nov. 3, with a program, followed by a ceremonial tree planting and an educational fair. The Texas Arbor Day celebration will feature a ceremony with keynote speaker Dan Lambe, President of the National Arbor Day Foundation, Nebraska City, Neb., educational activities and giveaways. There will be more than 1,000 student performers including a mariachi band, a drumline and the Grammy award-nominees Trout Fishing in America. Events are free and open to the public. Grand Prairie, the 15th largest city in the state, has a deep appreciation for trees dating back a century ago when pecan orchards flourished in the area. Today, with old growth pecan trees still dotting the urban forest, the city spends more than $4 per capita on trees each year. The Arbor Day celebration this year is aptly themed TreeEpic because it is being held at Epic Waters, the premier city health, wellness, recreation waterpark in the United States. Exhibiting an appreciation for the city's urban forest, construction crews relocated more than 150 existing trees, planted 250 new trees and have plans to plant more in the future. This is a great opportunity for families get out and learn about trees and how they protect and affect us. For more information, visit https://tfsweb.tamu.edu/arborday/.

Conroe : Open Garden Day,  Saturday, November 4. 9:00 a.m. until 11:00. Got gardening questions? Get answers!  Montgomery County Master Gardeners,  9020 Airport Road, Conroe . For more information, call 936-539-7824 or visit www.mcmga.com.
 
Rockwall: The Rockwall County Master Gardeners will be hosting a Fall Garden Tour. Saturday, November 4. The gardens will be open at this "at your Leisure" tour from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Cost is $10 in advance and $15 on the day of the Tour. Tickets can be purchased from Culver's Restaurant and the Rockwall County Extension Office during normal business hours. They can also be purchased online at https://rockmga.org/. There is a $1.54 service charge for online purchases. The theme of the 2017 tour is Landscape Solutions. Garden visitors will learn many new ideas to solve different home gardening challenges. Here are examples of the landscape solutions offered on the tour: Full sun gardens around a backyard pool; Small backyards with vertical gardening in raised beds; Designing garden rooms; Planting in berms; Vegetable gardens in small spaces; and Heritage gardens using "Pass-Along" plants. Master Gardeners are also selling raffle tickets for a beautiful handmade quilt and fun garden themed gift baskets. Be sure and look for them at the gardens and purchase some chances. The quilt will be displayed at the Rockwall Historical Museum at Harry Myers Park. Cost is 6 for $5. They can also be purchased in advance for the Extension Office. A picture of the quilt is online at rockmga.org. For more information regarding the tour and raffle sales, call 972-204-7660 or email rockwallmg@ag.tamu.edu.
 
Tomball: Fall Tomato and Pumpkin Contest, judges by Bill Adams, Jeremy Kollaus, and Chef Chris Crowder will held at 10:00 a.m., Sunday, November 4 at The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. For more information, call 281-351-8851, email info@arborgate.com, or visit www.arborgate.com.

Tyler: First Tuesday in the Garden. November 7. MG Henry Burch presents "All About Trees" at noon at the IDEA Garden within the Tyler Rose Garden. 420 Rose Park Dr., Tyler. For more information, call 903-590-2980 or visit https://txmg.org/smith/coming-events/.
 
Belton: The Bell County Master Gardeners will meet 10:00 a.m.-noon, November 8, at the Bell County Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Office, 1605 N. Main, Belton. An educational presentation will be followed by a business meeting. For additional information, contact carol.j.morisset@gmail.com or j-upchurch@sbcglobal.net
 
Georgetown: The Native Plant Society of Texas, Williamson County Chapter, will host authors Jim and Lynne Weber who will be speaking on the flora and fauna of Big Bend. This will be based on their recently published book Nature Watch Big Bend: A Seasonal Guide. The November 9 meeting will be held upstairs in the Georgetown Library, 402 W. 8th Street, Georgetown , beginning informally at 6:30 with the meeting at 7:00 p.m.
 
Houston: "Designing Your Landscape with Roses" will be the topic of the Houston Rose Society meeting, November 9, 7:00 p.m. at the Cherie Flores Garden Pavillon, 1500 Hermann Drive, Houston. The parking lot is Lot C located at Hermann Drive and Crawford Street. Gaye Hammond, past president of the Houston Rose Society, will present the program. Hammond is a master consulting rosarian, a national and international speaker on all aspects of rose horticulture, and a noted expert of the Texas A&M Earth-Kind Program and growing roses in no spray conditions.Free admission. For more information, visit www.houstonrose.org.

Weslaco: Steven Chamblee, Horticulturist of Chandor Gardens, will present "Garden Harmony 101." All too often, the garden master becomes a slave to the demands of her or his own creation. By properly honoring time, space, place, form, and function, gardens can be developed that evolve naturally with our lives. This talk will focus on re-establishing priorities, altering traditional views of garden composition, utilizing alternative resources and ultimately, physically creating your dream garden. You will also learn about " Texas Shade Gardens," a talk meant to guide you through the pitfalls and perils that await the novice shade gardener, so you can enjoy great shade garden success the first time. Garden talks are 9 a.m.-11:30 a.m., Thursday, November 9, at the AgriLife Extension Service, 2401 E. Business 83, Weslaco. $10/person advance ticket registration, 956-361-8236 by November 1 or $15 at the door.
 
Brownsville: Steven Chamblee, Horticulturist of Chandor Gardens, will present "Peace, Love & Milagros: Life Lessons from the Road," a collection of great stories about horticultural heavens, botanical blunders, and tender tales that will melt your heart from Chamblee's 30-plus years road tripping around Texas and "Monarchs to Mexico," an inspiring program about Steven's trips to Monterrey, Mexico where he assisted in developing the children's garden at Colegio Nezaldi, a small elementary school on the Monarch migration route. Garden talks are 5-8 p.m., Friday, November 10, at the Brownsville Historic Association's Stillman Gardens, 1325 E. Washington St., Brownsville. $10/person advance ticket registration, 956-541-5560 by November 1 or $15 at the door.
 
Austin: Dr. Sam Feagley, a soil scientist at Texas A&M, will speak about the important and timely topic of carbon sequestration at the November 13 meeting of the Austin Organic Gardeners' Club. The club meets at the Austin Area Garden Center, 2220 Barton Springs Rd, in Zilker Botanical Gardens, the 2nd Monday of each month except December. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for the opportunity to meet, mingle, and ask questions with local gardeners. Club business begins at 7 p.m. , followed by the guest speaker presentation. For more information, visit  www.austinorganicgardeners.org .
DECEMBER
 
Tomball: The Arbor Gate will hold a Christmas Open House with food, fun, and marriment at 2:00 p .m., Sunday, December 2 at The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. Music will be provided by Curtis Poullard and the Creole Zydeco Band and food will be provided by Every-Bellies, For more information, call 281-351-8851, email info@arborgate.com, or visit www.arborgate.com
 
Hempstead: The Waller County Master Gardeners is currently accepting applications for its 2018 Master Gardener Training Program. Registration closes December 15. Classes are scheduled for most Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. from January 6 through early April. Registration is $160 per person and covers training materials, a mandatory background check and speaker fees. For more information visit txmg.org/wallermg or call the Waller County Extension office at 979-826-7651.
JANUARY

Hempstead: The Waller County Master Gardeners will start accepting pre-orders on November 1 for their 2018 Fruit Tree (and more) Sale scheduled for Saturday, January 20. Three informational seminars about the varieties being offered are scheduled as follows: Nov. 2 from 10 a.m.-noon at the Waller County Extension Office, 846 6th St., Hempstead; Nov. 4 from 2 p.m.-4 p.m. at the Waller County Community Center, 21274 FM1098 Loop, Prairie View; Nov. 9 from 10 a.m.-noon at the Pattison Area Volunteer Fire Department Bldg., 2950 FM359, Pattison. For more information about the sale and these seminars, visit txmg.org/wallermg or call the Waller County Extension office at 979-826-7651.
Monthly meetings
 
If you would like your organization's events included in "Monthly Meetings" or would like to make a change to a listed meeting, please contact us at Monthly Meetings. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details. 
 
FIRST WEEK
  
Kaufman: The Kaufman County Master Gardeners meet the first Monday of each month at the First Community Church at 1401 Trinity Drive in Crandall. January through April and August and September meetings are at 9 a.m., with the remaining meetings beginning at 7 p.m. For additional information visit http://www.kcmga.org, call 972-932-9069 or email to sbburden@ag.tamu.edu.

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu
or call 281-855-5600.

Dallas: Garden Masters, Inc., meet the first Wednesday of each month at North Haven Gardens, 7700 Northaven Rd., Dallas. The club hosts different speaker each month from 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Bring your lunch! For more information, email Bunny Williams at bunny-williams@sbcglobal.net.
 
Kerrville: Hill Country Master Gardeners meet the first Wednesday of each month at 1:00 pm at Hill Country Youth Event Center, 3785 Hwy 27. For more information visit www.hillcountrymastergardeners.org.
 
Midland/Odessa: The Permian Basin Master Gardeners meet at noon, the first Wednesday of each month, lternating between the Midland and Ector County's Extensions Offices. For more information about location, call 432-498-4071 or 432-686-4700.

Navasota: The Navasota Garden Club meets on the first Wednesday of each month (September through May) at 10:00 a.m., usually at the First Baptist Church Family Life Center, 300 Church Street, Navasota. If not meeting at the church, a change of meeting notice will be placed on the door at the North entrance. Guests are welcome. Members are from Grimes County and surrounding counties.
   
Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Atlanta: The Cass County Master Gardeners meet the first Thursday of each month at the Atlanta Memorial Hospital Conference Room, State Highway 77 @ S. Williams St., Atlanta. A business meeting is followed by an educational program. The public is welcome to attend. For additional information, call 903-756-5391 or visit http://cass.agrilife.org

Fort Worth: The Native Plant Society of Texas - North Central Chapter meets the first Thursday of each month, excluding January and July, at the Fort Worth Botanic Garden, 3220 Botanic Garden Blvd., Fort Worth. Meeting begins at 6:30 p.m., program begins at 7:00 p.m. Guest speakers present educational programs on topics of interest. Members, friends, family, guests and the public are welcome. For a list of speakers and topics or more information, visit http://www.txnativeplants.org.
 
Hempstead: The Waller County Master Gardeners usually meet at 9 a.m. the first Thursday of each month at the Waller County AgriLife Extension Office, 846 6th St., Hempstead. For more information on the meeting schedule, visit http://txmg.org/wallermg or call 979-826-7651.
 
Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners hold their monthly meeting at noon on the first Thursday of each month at 623 Fair Street, Gonzales. Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or visit http://gonzalesmastergardeners.org for more information.

New Braunfels: The Comal Garden Club meets the first Thursday of each month at 9:30 a.m. at Southbank Clubhouse, 222 Southbank Blvd., New Braunfels.

Hempstead: The Peckerwood Garden Conservation Foundation, 20559 F.M. 359, Hempstead, hosts a special Peckerwood Insider's Tour at 10 a.m. on the first Saturday of each month. Spaces are limited so pre-registration is required. $15, free for members. For more information, visit http://www.peckerwoodgarden.org/explore/visit-peckerwood-garden/.
 
SECOND WEEK
 
Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of each month (except December) at the Austin Area Garden Center, 2220 Barton Springs Road, Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.austinorganicgardeners.org.

Jacksonville: The Cherokee County Master Gardeners meet on the second Monday of each month at 9:30 a.m. at Woodmen of the World, 1800 College Ave., Jacksonville. For more information, e-mail Tom Abbott at tom@deerfield-abbey.org.

Glen Rose: The Glen Rose Garden Club meets at 10 a.m. on the second Tuesday of each month (September through May) at the Somervell County Community Center in Glen Rose. For additional information, email stringer030@yahoo.com.

Glen Rose: The Prairie Rose Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets at 6 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Somerville County Citizen Center, 209 SW Barnard St., Glen Rose. For additional information, email prairierose.npsot@gmail.com
 
Harrison County: The Harrison County Master Gardeners meet on the second Tuesday of each month in the Harrison County Annex building, 102 W Houston St. (south side of the square), Marshall. Meetings are held in the 2nd floor AgriLife Extension meeting room. For more information, call 903-935-8413, or email wannagrow2@gmail.com.   
 
Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July, August and December at St. John's Lutheran Church in Marion. Directions to St. John's Lutheran Church: From FM 78 turn south onto FM 465 and the church is just past the Marion School on the right. From IH-10 go north on FM 465 towards Marion. The Church will be on the left, just before you get to town. A plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.
 
Quitman: The Quitman Garden Club meets at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Quitman Library on E Goode Street, Quitman. It is a diverse group that welcomes all visitors. For more information, e-mail quitmangardenclub@gmail.com.
 
Denton:  The Denton County Master Gardener Association meets from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. the
second Wednesday of each month . Meetings are open to the public. For complete details, visit  http://dcmga.com/.
 
Humble: The Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, hosts a Lunch Bunch the second Wednesday of each month from noon until 2 p.m. Take a sack lunch or order a box lunch from Starbucks when you call 281-443-8731 to reserve your spot. Master Gardeners and Masters Naturalists may earn CEU credits by attending.
 
Jacksboro: The Jacksboro Garden Club meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month (except June, July and August) at the Concerned Citizens Center, 400 East Pine Street, Jacksboro. For more information, call Melinda at 940-567-6218.
 
Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association's Learn at Lunch program meet the second Wednesday of each month. The business meeting begins at 11:30 a.m., with the program at noon, at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The program is presented for horticultural education and is free to the public. For further information call 903-236-8429, visit www.txmg.org/gregg, or like us on Facebook at Gregg County Master Gardeners. 
 
Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the
second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.or g and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.
 
Woodway: The McLennan County Master Gardeners meet on the second Wednesday each month at noon at the Carleen Bright Arboretum, 9001 Bosque Blvd., Woodway. Educational programs follow the business session. For more information, call 254-757-5180.
 
Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. (social) 7:00 (meeting) the second Thursday of each month except in July in the AgriLife Extension auditorium, 1225 Pearl 2nd floor (downtown Beaumont next to the Court House). For more information contact: 409-835-8461 or txmg.org/jcmg.
 
Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Kathy Henderson at kshend@verizon.net or visit http://www.npsot.org/wp/wilco.
 
Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the
second Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the new Orange County Expo Center on Hwy 1442 in Orangefield. Enter the building in the front entrance, first door on the right, Texas AgriLife offices. Pot luck supper at 6 p.m. Visit http://txmg.org/orange for more information.

Pasadena : The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the  second Thursday of each month  at The Genoa Friendship Garden Educational Building at 1202 Genoa Red Bluff, Pasadena. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu .

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Smithville: The Smithville Community Gardens meets at 5:30 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Smithville Recreation Center. 
 
Angleton: The Brazoria County Master Gardeners meet at 11 a.m. on the second Friday of each month at the Brazoria County Extension Office, 21017 County Road 171, Angleton. There is a general business meeting followed by a brief educational program each month. For further information call 979-864-1558, ext.110.
 
College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 a.m. in the training room of the College Station Waste Water Facility building at the end of North Forest Parkway, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.
 
Houston: The Spring Branch African Violet Club meets the second Saturday of each month, January through November, at 10:30am at the Copperfield Baptist Church, 8350 Highway 6 North, Houston. Call Karla at 281-748-8417 prior to attending to confirm meeting date and time.
  
Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1:30 p.m. on the second Saturday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.
 
Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member's homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.
 
THIRD WEEK
 
Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.
 
Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardener's meet on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W Henderson, Cleburne. Meeting times are at 2 p.m. October through April, except December and at 6 p.m. May through September. An educational program precedes the business meeting. For additional information, contact Sue Matern at 817-517-9076.
  
New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. the third Monday of each month (except April and December,) at the  GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For additional information, call 830-620-3440 or visit http://txmg.org/comal/. 

Texarkana: The Four Corners Chapter of Native Plant Society of Texas meets at 7 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at the Southwest Center, 3222 W. 7th St. (U.S. 67), Texarkana. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Belinda McCoy at 903-424-7724 or blackmtngardens@yahoo.com
 
Corpus Christi: The Nueces Master Gardeners meet at noon the third Tuesday of each month, except December, at Garden Senior Center, 5325 Greely Dr., Corpus Christi. An educational program precedes the business meeting. For further information call 361 767-5217.
 
Evant: The Evant Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m., usually at the bank in downtown Evant. To confirm the date, time and place of each month's meeting, call 254-471-5860. 
 
New Braunfels: The Lindheimer Chapter (Comal County) of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the third Tuesday of each month at  6:30 pm at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. Meetings include an informative speaker and a Plant of the Month presentation. Meetings are free and visitors are welcome. For more information,visit www.npsot.org/w/lindheimer Note : there will be no meeting in June or December.
 
Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 892 Airport Rd., Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.
 
Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Knights of Columbus Hall, 702 Burney Road, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.
 
Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.
 
Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.
 
Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.
 
Brownwood: Brownwood Garden Club meets the third Thursday of each month, 11:30 a.m.- 1 p.m.  The club meetings are at Southside Baptist Church, 1219 Indian Creek Road, with refreshments and a speaker presentation. Visitors are welcome. For more information, email boeblingen@centex.net or call 817-454-8175.
 
Hallettsville: The Hallettsville Garden Club meets at 2 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month from September through May, at the Hallettsville Garden and Cultural Center, 605 E 2nd St, Hallettsville. Each month, the club hosts speakers that provide informative programs on a wide range of gardening subjects, and refreshments are provided by member hostesses after the business meeting. Visitors are welcome. Please email Sharon Harrigan at sharonspetals@yahoo.com for more information.

Houston:
The Native Plant Society of Texas - Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) at the Houston SArboretum and Nature Center in Memorial Park (4501 Woodway Dr.). For more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http:/npsot.org/wp/Houston.

San Antonio: The Bexar County Master Gardeners (BCMG) meet on the third Thursday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension Office, 3355 Cherry Ridge Dr., Suite 208, San Antonio. During the months of Jan., March, May, July, Sep. and Nov., an evening meeting begins with a social time at 6 p.m. followed by a free presentation from 6:30-8:30 p.m. During the intervening months (Feb., April, June, Aug., Oct., Dec.), afternoon educational seminars/general meetings are held from 1-3:30 p.m. Check http://www.bexarmg.org/ to verify meeting date for any given month, as circumstances could require a change, and to find information on the speaker and topic scheduled for each meeting.
 
Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 6:30 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, at the AgriLife Building, 210 East Live Oak, Seguin. After a brief social hour, the meeting and guest speaker begins at 7 p.m. The meeting is free and open to the public. For additional information, call 830-303-3889 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

Hempstead: The Peckerwood Garden Conservation Foundation, 20559 F.M. 359, Hempstead, hosts the Evening at Peckerwood Lecture series at 7 p.m. on the third Friday of each month. Tickets are available online. Tickets are $10, $5 for members.For more information, visit http://www.peckerwoodgarden.org/explore/visit-peckerwood-garden/.

FOURTH WEEK
 
Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.
 
Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardeners, a program of Texas AgriLife Extension, meet the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. There is a public gardening program at each meeting and pertinent information may be found at brazosmg.com or 979-823-0129.
 
Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.
 
Linden: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the senior citizens building at 507 S Kaufman St. in Linden at 6:30. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Karen Tromza at khtromza@yahoo.com.
 
Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Deborah Beggs Moncrief Garden Center, 3220 Botanic Blvd., Ft. Worth. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.
 
San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or email npsot.sanantonio@gmail.com.
 
Houston: The Houston Native Prairie Association meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Wednesday of each month at the Cherie Flores Pavilion in McGovern Centennial Gardens at Hermann Park, 1500 Hermann Drive, Houston. For more information, contact hnpat@prairies.org.

Austin: The Garden Club of Austin meets at Zilker Botanical Gardens auditorium, 2220 Barton Springs Rd., Austin, at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month. 7:00-7:30 p.m. Refreshments and Social, followed by a presentation at 7:30 p.m. Free. For additional information, visit http://thegardenclubofaustin.org/.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the community room behind the Greater Texas Federal Credit Union,1300 N. Bell, Cedar Park, unless there is special event planned. Following a program and short business meeting, we share a pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call president Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email info@leandergc.org.
 
Dallas: The Dallas County Master Gardeners meet the fourth Thursday of each month at 11:30 a.m. For location and program information, visit h ttp://www.dallascountymastergardeners.org/ or contact The Helpdesk, M-F, 8 to 4:30 214-904-3053.
 
Dallas: The Greater Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the REI, 4515 LBJ Freeway, Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.gdogc.org.
  
Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817-483-7746.

Hempstead: The Peckerwood Garden Conservation Foundation, 20559 F.M. 359, Hempstead, holds an Open Day, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. on the fourth Saturday of each month. Tours start at 10 a.m. and the last tour leaves at 2 p.m. Tickets available online or at the gate. $10, free for members. For more information, visit http://www.peckerwoodgarden.org/explore/visit-peckerwood-garden/.
 
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Texas Gardener's Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2017. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

 

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