September 27, 2017
  
RNA discovery could help boost plant heat, drought tolerance
 
By Gabe Saldana
Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
 
Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists have discovered a ribonucleic acid, or RNA, that can increase the thale cress plant's resistance to stress from drought and salt.
 
The discovery could help illuminate a new pathway to engineering drought- and salt-tolerant plants, including food crops, said Dr. Liming Xiong, AgriLife Research associate professor, Dallas.
 
The research is published in the journal Plant Physiology and online at http://bit.ly/2ydul4D.
 
"This is the first finding of a long non-coding RNA, or lncRNA, that regulates plant tolerance to adverse, non-physiological external factors," Xiong said.
 
The lncRNA his team discovered in thale cress plants existed in low numbers under non-stress conditions, but levels increased when the plants encountered drought or salt stress, he said. Manually increasing the level of the lncRNA showed corresponding increases in drought and salt tolerance compared with plants where the lncRNA level was unaltered.
 
Most RNA direct or "code" cell machinery to produce proteins. Non-coding RNA, or ncRNA, does not direct protein production but could affect how gene expressions manifest in innumerable other ways. As such, they are considered regulators of important biological processes, Xiong said.
 
"And there are different types of ncRNA," he said. "Small ncRNA have received much attention in recent years, but in many long, or lncRNA, like the one we found to affect drought and salt tolerance in thale cress, the biological functions remain unknown."
 
The basic difference between small and long non-coding RNA is the number of nucleotides - the structural building blocks of RNA. Long have more.
 
Xiong said investigating the effects of lncRNA is a novel approach to plant drought and salt tolerance research.
 
"Most of the current work on improving plant stress tolerance does not focus on lncRNA but on the genes that code protein production," he said. "However, manipulation of those protein-encoding genes often impairs plant growth and development."
 
But the lncRNA studied by Xiong's team can be tweaked without any apparent detriment to the plant's health, he said.
 
"It's early still, but we could be on the brink of a whole new approach to engineering drought and salt tolerance in plants, including food plants," Xiong said. "Our next step will be to engineer the lncRNA levels in plants other than thale cress and to test whether it might improve drought and salt tolerance across a broader spectrum."
Fall is for planting
 
Schultz Communications
 
Spring may be the most common season for planting, but gardening experts say the autumn season is also a great time to plant wildflower seeds, perennials, bulbs, shrubs and trees. That's because planting in the fall gives plants a chance to get established before the cold weather of winter arrives.
 
"Fall planting reduces the stress on new plants and newly sprouted seeds," said Mike Lizotte, managing partner of AmericanMeadows.com. "As temperatures cool off in the fall, most wildflowers naturally drop their seeds. So when you plant in the autumn, you're actually following the example of Mother Nature."
 
Jeff Dinslage, president of NatureHills.com, a popular online source for trees, shrubs and perennial plants, agrees. "Fall is great for planting," said Dinslage, "Plants love to get acclimated in a new location after the heat of the summer has subsided. The soil is still warm, so plant roots can really get a growth spurt that helps them get ready for winter. Then, in the spring, that tree or shrub can really come to life in your yard."
 
Spring-flowering bulbs
 
Fall is the best time to plant bulbs such as tulips and daffodils, because these spring-flowering bulbs need a cold season in order to produce blooms. Daffodils are one of the most popular bulbs because they flower early in the season - and they produce blossoms year after year.
 
Miniature Daffodil Tete Boucle has light and dark golden-yellow double flowers that bloom in early spring. This smaller Narcissus variety is happy in pots on the patio, in a sunny garden border, or even as a charming addition to window boxes. The yellow flowers stand 6-8 inches tall, and this variety is very similar in form to the wild daffodil from which it was hybridized. These fantastic plants are super-easy to plant in fall, and they don't care about soil (as long as it's well-drained).
 
Tulips are another favorite spring-flowering bulb, and the new varieties of colorful tulips never seems to end. Double Late Tulip Pink Star is one of the most spectacular tulips available. The flowers have so many petals that this type of tulip is commonly known as Peony Tulips. Double Late Tulips bloom in the late spring and are very long lasting - often blooming well into early summer.
 
Double Late Tulip Pink Star has full peony-like flowers in shades of magenta and pink with accents of apricot. Plant Pink Star in large groups for a head-turning display that will provide many 16-18" tall flowers.
 
Perennials love fall
 
Fall is an ideal time to plant perennials, which love the season's cooler temperatures. Compared to spring-planted perennials, which typically suffer a period of transplant shock, plants installed in the fall adapt quickly to their new environments.
 
"Although you won't see a lot of stem and leaf growth in the fall, the plants put into the ground in autumn are busy growing new roots," said David Salman, chief horticulturist for HighCountryGardens.com. "With the arrival of spring, the fall-planted garden is ready to burst forth with vigorous new growth and a profusion of flowers."
 
One of Salman's favorite flowering perennials to plant in the fall is Texas Blazing Star (Liatris mucronata) - a large, showy perennial that blooms in late summer to attract numerous butterflies to its nectar-rich lavender-pink flowers. This Liatris species offers an amazing display of tall, lavender-pink flowers - and each flower stalk is a true magnet for pollinators. Originating from the plains of northern Texas, Oklahoma and the Southern Great Plains, this resilient plant is a water-thrifty choice for drier planting sites. Texas Blazing Star (Liatris mucronata) is deer resistant and grows well in USDA Zones 5-9.
 
Agastache (Hummingbird Mint) is another plant that Salman recommends for fall planting. During the past decade, many new varieties of Agastache have been introduced with colorful flowers ranging from apricot orange to bright pink. These are showy, fragrant, long-blooming perennials that (as their name suggests) are highly attractive hummingbirds. Sometimes known as Hyssop, Agastache plants are essential for a pollinator-friendly garden and have excellent resistance to browsing deer and rabbits.
 
Agastche 'Desert Sunrise' is a cross between the two best southwestern species of the genus: Agastache rupestris and Agastache cana. This new perennial introduction is a sturdy, vigorous grower that blooms non-stop from midsummer through fall. The bi-color flowers are pink and orange - just like a sunset. The flower spikes are quite large and both the foliage and flowers are delightfully fragrant. Agastche 'Desert Sunrise' is available exclusively from www.highcountrygardens.com, which also sells many other varieties of Agastaches.
 
Plant wildflower seeds now for summer flowers
 
Even though most of us think about sowing seeds in the spring after the winter has passed, another great time to sow wildflower seeds is in the late fall and early winter.
 
In areas in the U.S. with hard, freezing winters (the Northeast, Midwest and the Rockies) seeds should be sown after a killing frost but before the ground freezes. In frost-free areas with hot summers (South Florida, southern Texas, Southern California and the low deserts of the Southwest), seeds can be planted almost all winter, but are best sown right before rainy weather sets in.
 
For best results, the ground should be prepped before sowing seeds. Clear away most competing plants, and turn over the soil with a rototiller. At the very least, take a metal rake and rough up the soil so seeds can penetrate the soil surface.
 
"Whether you are sowing a five-acre meadow or five square feet in a suburban yard, the better you prepare the area to get rid of weeds, grasses and other competing plants, the better results your seed planting with yield," said Mike Lizotte. "You're not giving the seed a good chance to survive if it has to compete with existing root structures in the soil."
 
American Meadows has created six different regional seed mixes to increase both seed germination and plant survival. For example, the Northeast Wildflower Seed Mix contains 27 different wildflower species, all of which thrive in the growing conditions of the Northeast.
 
Different wildflower seed mixes are also available for full sun, partial shade and dry growing conditions. Other seed mixes include species that flower in the fall, and seeds for specific flower types (such as sunflowers, zinnias and cosmos).
 
It's a great time to plant trees
 
Trees are the anchors in a well-designed landscape. As the largest plants, trees naturally become focal points that draw the eye into a yard or garden. Choosing the right trees can make the difference between an interesting, inviting yard and a boring yard that no one notices.
 
Jeff Dinslage of Nature Hills Nursery says one of his favorite trees to plant in the fall is the Autumn Blaze Red Maple, one of the superstars in the fall landscape. This variety is a cross between a red maple and a silver maple, and it has become one of the most sought-after maple trees in the USA.
 
Autumn Blaze Red Maple has an upward shape that works well in clusters or as a stand-alone focal point in the yard. The tree is disease and pest resistant - and it's tough enough to persevere during drought conditions and strong enough to withstand heavy snows. But in the fall Autumn Blaze Red Maple becomes a landscape superstar, when its leaves turn a bright orange-red that is dazzling enough to stop traffic. At maturity, an Autumn Blaze Red Maple can reach 40-60 feet tall and 40-60 feet wide throughout USDA Zones 4-8
 
Another popular tree that Dinslage recommends for fall planting is a Honeycrisp Apple Tree. A Honeycrisp apple is a best-selling fruit at the grocery store, and a Honeycrisp Apple Tree is a great addition to any property. A flurry of pink blossoms covers the tree in early spring. Then yellowish green apples cover the tree in late summer and ripen with a red blush in September. But the fruits don't immediately drop when ripe, so you can take your time in picking them.
 
To maximize fruit production, plant another apple tree close by to aid in pollination (such as Gala, Granny Smith, Empire, McIntosh or Red Delicious). This semi-dwarf tree reaches 15-20 feet tall, so it fits comfortably in most yards.
Gardening tips

It depends on where you garden, but winter weeds sprout with the first good rain in September. In areas of the state, like Houston, that were impacted by Hurricane Harvey, those pesky plants are already up and growing. It is too late to apply a pre-emergent herbicide but you can still cover them in your beds and garden with a thick layer of mulch to help control them. Mulch not only helps with weeds but it helps conserve moisture and adds organic matter to the soil as it decomposes.  

Have a favorite gardening tip you'd like to share? Texas Gardener's Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a copy of Texas Gardene r's 2017 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Garde ning Tips.
Upcoming garden events
 
If you would like your organization's events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.
Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath have disrupted activities all along the Gulf coast and well inland. Before attending any event listed below, please contact the event organizers to ensure that it has not been cancelled, rescheduled, or relocated.
SEPTEMBER

Arlington: Native Plant Sale hosted by the Native Plant Society of Texas - North Central Chapter, Saturday, September 30, from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., at River Legacy Park - Elm Grove Pavilion, 701 NE Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington. All sale plants have been grown organically from local seed by members, so they don't have neonicotinoids. Knowledgeable volunteers will be on hand to answer questions and offer tips. Native plants are better adapted to our climate, have minimal water needs, don't need pesticides or fertilizers, and benefit birds, butterflies and the ecosystem in general. The event raises funds for outreach, including training, education and demonstration gardens. For a list of species with photos, visit http://www.txnativeplants.org/plantsale/index.php.
 
Austin: Expanding on a popular seminar series, a Water-Wise Symposium for home gardeners has been set for September 30 at the Cepeda Branch, Austin Public Library on the Eastside. Participants will learn how to save precious water and money by capturing, channeling and controlling water in the lawn and garden. They will get practical advice from a distinguished panel of Austin experts. Topics covered in the day-long program include rainwater collection, rainscapes, efficient home and garden design, grey water use and City of Austin rebates. Attendance at the symposium is free. But, advance registration is required because seating is strictly limited. The agenda for the full-day symposium is as follows; 10:00-10:50 Rainwater Collection, Ed Parken, Travis County Master Gardener; 11:00-noon Rainscapes, Tom Franke, COA Watershed Protection Department; 1:00-1:50 Water Efficiency, Jerry Naiser, Travis County Master Gardener; 2:00-2:50 Holistic Home Design for Water Collection and Conservation, Billy Kniffen, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, ARCSA instructor; 3:00-3:50 Grey Water Use and Design, Robert Stefani, Austin Water; 4:00-4:15 Rebates from City of Austin, Chris Charles, COA; and 4:15-4:45 Panel Discussion: Best Practices. Attendance at the symposium is limited to 45 people. Based on similar programs, the symposium is likely to sell out well in advance. Interested residents should register as soon as practical. Attendance is free. But advance registration is required at http://bit.ly/wisewater_conservation. The program will be held at the Cepeda Branch, Austin Public Library, 651 N Pleasant Valley Rd, Austin. Lunch is not provided. Numerous restaurants are nearby. More information at http://www.tcmastergardeners.org/travis-county-master-gardeners-association.
 
Belton: The Bell County Master Gardeners will hold a fall plant sale 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m., September 30, at the Bell County Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Office, 1605 Belton. For additional information, contact carol.j.morisset@gmail.com or j-upchurch@sbcglobal.net.  
Nacogdoches: Stephen F. Austin State University's SFA Gardens will host the inaugural Kiwifruit Field Day with Dr. David Creech, SFA Gardens director, and Tim Hartmann, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service employee, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. September 30 at the Brundrett Conservation Education Building. Through this introduction to growing kiwifruit in East Texas, Creech will lead participants on a journey through kiwifruit production practices in China, New Zealand, Nacogdoches and Alabama. He also will discuss best management practices from established growers across the world. Hartmann will discuss the "nuts and bolts" of growing kiwifruit, including site selection, pruning, pest control, trellising, and pre- and post-harvest techniques. He also will discuss species and varieties that will grow best in the South. Research into the adaptation and feasibility of kiwifruit production in the state by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and SFA has been made possible thanks to a Specialty Crop Block Grant through the Texas Department of Agriculture. 4 pesticide applicator CEU credits are available for the Field Day. The registration deadline is Sept. 25. The field day costs $25 and includes lunch. To register, please fill out an online form: Kiwifruit Regisration Form (https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdpqOQQrGtwEPRCPBQ_QJ1Niq7g7T_zH8pMbEWB0aiXLChHMQ/viewform), or contact SFA Gardens at (936) 468-4404 or dawnstover@sfasu.edu.
  
The Woodlands: Woodlands Landscaping Solutions will be presented Saturday, September 30, 9:00 a.m.-noon at The Woodlands Township Parks, Recreation and Environmental Services, 8203 Millennium Forest Drive, The Woodlands. Free to attend, no registration required. For more information, please visit http://www.thewoodlandstownship-tx.gov/Calendar.aspx?EID=5931 
OCTOBER

Katy: Mary Karish, Texas Gardener contributing writer, will teach Organic Gardening & Fruit Orchard Management during October and November. This course will teach you how to enrich your soil with organic matter. You will learn how to generate compost that is loaded with nutrients and disease fighting capabilities. You will also learn how to establish a garden area, seed starting and transplanting. This class provides practical guidelines on selecting and planting fruit trees and citrus that are suitable for your area. Included will be maintaining, pruning and fertilizing fruit trees and citrus as well as organic disease and pest management. The course will combine theory and hands on practice sessions. Practice sessions will be held on Saturdays and timing will be agreed on the first day of class. Limit 24 students. The course is open to the general public. Class will be held 6:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesdays (class theory) and Saturdays (practice sessions) October 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, and November 7, 14 at James E. Taylor High School, Room 1160, 20700 Kingsland Blvd., Katy . Tuition: $70. To register, visit http://www.katyisd.org/dept/ce/Documents/Community_Education_Course_Catalog.pdf .

Tyler: First Tuesday in the Garden. October 3. MG Anne Pattullo will preview the bulbs for sale at the "From Bulbs to Blooms" sale on October 14. Noon at the IDEA Garden within the Tyler Rose Garden, 420 Rose Park Dr. Tyler. For more information 903-590-2980 or https://txmg.org/smith/coming-events.

Tomball: Linda Crum, Texas Bluebird Society, will present " Attracting Bluebirds to The Garden ," at 10 a.m., Thursday, October 5. The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. For more information, call 281-351-8851, email info@arborgate.com , or visit www.arborgate.com.

Victoria: Victoria County Master Gardeners will have a Fall Plant Sale on October 7 at the MG Pavilion & Victoria Educational Gardens, 283 Bachelor Dr., Victoria. The sale will begin at 8 a.m. and conclude when the plants are sold out. This year the theme will be "Fall Is The Time For Planting" and will have fruit and citrus trees, fall color bowls, fairy gardens, succulents, Texas Superstars, fall annuals, perennial shrubs and color. Arrive early for the best selections.

Tarrant County : On Sunday, October 8, five private gardens in Keller, Southlake, and Westlake will participate in the Garden Conservancy's Open Days program, welcoming the public from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Open Day is rain or shine, and no reservations are required. Admission is $7 per garden and tickets can be purchased on site; children 12 & under free. Call 1-888-842-2442, or visit www.opendaysprogram.org for more information. Discount admission tickets are available through advanced mail order. A portion of the proceeds from this Open Day also benefits the Tarrant County Master Gardener Association. Master Gardeners will be hosts at the homes and offer talks on water conservation, composting, insects, propagation and Rose Rosette. Included on the October 8th Open Day: Morrison Home, 217 Chandler Road, Keller - features mature oak trees, perennials, a large vegetable garden, grapevines, fruit trees such as apricots, pears, and peaches, and a focal point fountain. The Stutsman's Garden, 1575 Knox Road, Keller - highlights include hand-built stone walls providing architectural interest, more than sixty-five native post oaks as well as many understory ornamental trees, native and non-native plants, and a charming garden house is a focal point in the perennial garden. Estate of Jan & George Grubbs, Jr., 702 South White Chapel Boulevard, Southlake - features include spiral Spartan junipers, a pond-side gazebo, bronze sculpture, an angel fountain surrounded by boxwood and annuals, extensive perennials and trees, and a pool garden with a five-foot cherub fountain and large planted containers anchoring each corner. Schill Garden, 162 Jellico Circle, Southlake - includes a vegetable garden, a butterfly garden, a greenhouse, a large flagstone patio with a fireplace, and a dry rock bed that helps divert water from the foundation of the house. Paigebrooke Farm, 1 Paigebrooke, Westlake - a former flat-pastured dairy farm has been transformed into an oasis of ponds, trees, hills, fountains, and rock walls. A patio and garden area was designed by Elizabeth Smidt of Great Gardens of McKinney, and features a pizza oven and entertaining spot.

Marion: The Guadalupe Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas will meet October 10, at St. John's Lutheran Church, FM 465, Marion. The speaker will be Judit Greene, wildlife specialist, who will speak on selecting native plants for shady area. There is a plant/seed exchange and greeting at 6:30 p.m., followed by the program at 7:00. For more information, directions to St. John's Lutheran Church, or membership applications, visit http://npsot.org/wp/guadalupe/.

Tomball: Chris Wiesinger, Southern Bulb Co., and Heidi Sheesley, TreeSearch Farms, will present " Bulbs and Buddies ," at 10:00 a.m., Saturday, October 10. The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. For more information, call 281-351-8851, email info@arborgate.com, or visit www.arborgate.com.

Belton: The Bell County Master Gardeners will hold a general membership meeting 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m., October 11, at the Bell County Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Office, 1605 Belton. For additional information, contact carol.j.morisset@gmail.com or j-upchurch@sbcglobal.net.

Tomball: Angela Chandler, The Garden Academy, will present "What Your Weeds Are Trying To Tell You," Wednesday, October 11, noon-1 p.m. Weeds are unwelcome trespassers in the home landscape, but they have a lot to say. Learning to read them will help you diagnose soil conditions so you can improve the overall health and fertility of your soil. Before you pull them out or reach for the sprayer, take a minute to listen. Your weed management strategy will take a giant leap forward. This class will cover how to read the weeds and what to do with the information. We will also cover the place weeds have in nature, some useful weeds, and a long term strategy to reduce their presence in your garden. The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. For more information, call 281-351-8851, email info@arborgate.com, or visit www.arborgate.com.
 
Houston: "Indoor Plant Purifiers" presented by Linda Gay, former director of Mercer Botanic Gardens. 10-11:30 a.m., October 12, Genoa Friendship Garden Education Building, 1202 Genoa Red Bluff Rd, Houston. Free. Harris County Master Gardener event. Limited seating. For more information, visit hcmga.tamu.edu.
 
Houston: "Old Rose Treasures of New Orleans - Surviving the Heat, Floods and Hurricanes" is the topic of the Houston Rose Society meeting, October 12, 7:30 p.m. at the Cherie Flores Garden Pavillon, 1500 Hermann Drive, Houston. The parking lot is Lot C located at Hermann Drive and Crawford Street. Leo Watermeier will present the program. Leo has been the curator of the rose garden in the Louis Armstrong Park in New Orleans since its inception. Learn how more than 150 varieties of old garden roses are grown in this historic park and the French Quarter. Leo will also discuss how hurricanes have affected those roses over the years and give suggestions on how to best recover from their impact. Free admission. For more information, visit www.houstonrose.org .
 
Conroe : Fall Plant Sale,  Saturday, October 14. Presentation 8:00 a.m., sale  9:00 a.m. until noon. Come get your plants! Don't forget your wagon.  Montgomery County Master Gardeners,  9020 Airport Road, Conroe . For more information, call 936-539-7824 or visit www.mcmga.com.
 
Tomball: Henry Flowers, Festival Hill Gardens, will present " Cilantro-Herb of the Year 2017 ," at 10:00 a.m. Saturday, October 14. The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. For more information, call 281-351-8851, email info@arborgate.com, or visit www.arborgate.com.
 
Tomball: Pam and Leah Gunter will present " Gunter's Heirloom Vegetable ," (:00 a.m. until noon. Saturday. October 14. The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. For more information, call 281-351-8851, email info@arborgate.com, or visit www.arborgate.com.

Tyler: From Bulbs to Blooms - Fall Conference and Sale will be held October 14. Greg Grant, Texas Gardener contributing editor, and Smith County Horticulture Agent and Bulb Expert, will be the featured speaker on Hard to Find Bulbs and Bulbs good for the South. Along with bulbs, trees and shrubs will be available. Registration, 8:30 a.m.; Program, 9:00 a.m.; Sale, 11:30 a.m. Harvey Hall, 2000 W Front St., Tyler. Free and open to the public. For additional information, visit https://txmg.org/smith/coming-events/ or call 903-590-2980.
 
Tomball: Gaye Hammond, Houston Rose Society, will present " Landscaping with Flare ," at 11:00 a.m., Sunday, October 15. The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. For more information, call 281-351-8851, email info@arborgate.com, or visit www.arborgate.com.
 
Houston: Harris County Master Gardener Prec. 2 Open Garden Day, 8:30-11:00 a.m., October 16, Genoa Friendship Garden, 1202 Genoa Red Bluff Rd, Houston. Free. Master Gardeners will answer gardening questions. For more information, visit hcmga.tamu.edu.
 
Tomball: Jeremy Kollaus, Swiss Alp Growers , will present " Leafy, Luscious and Lots to Harvest ," at 10:00 a.m., Thursday, October 19. The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. For more information, call 281-351-8851, email info@arborgate.com, or visit www.arborgate.com.
 
Tomball: Angela Chandler, The Garden Academy, will present " Rain Gardens ," at 10:00 a.m., Saturday, October 21. The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. For more information, call 281-351-8851, email info@arborgate.com, or visit www.arborgate.com .
 
Tomball: Cynthia Graham, RN, BSN, will present "Liver Lingo of Plants," Wednesday, October 25, noon-1 p.m. Our livers cleanse the blood. They are the filtering factories of our bodies. Plants can supply the nutrients to keep the liver clean, clear and healthy. When the liver is working properly the blood moves nutrients, hormones are flushed, recycled and balanced. Weight can be better regulated when fat, drugs and other toxins can be removed from the abdomen. Learn the plants involved in Liver Lingo. Maybe this year the holiday 5-20 lbs. gain will miss you. The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. For more information, call 281-351-8851, email info@arborgate.com, or visit www.arborgate.com.
 
Tomball: Cynthia Graham, RN, BSN, will present " Teas, Tinctures and Toddies ," at 10:00 a.m., Saturday, October 28. The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. For more information, call 281-351-8851, email info@arborgate.com, or visit www.arborgate.com.
 
Tomball: Angela Chandler, The Garden Academy, and Matt & Kelly Brantley, BZ Honey, will present " Bee Forum ," at 11:00 a.m., Sunday, October 29. The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. For more information, call 281-351-8851, email info@arborgate.com, or visit www.arborgate.com.
NOVEMBER

Conroe : Open Garden Day,  Saturday, November 4. 9:00 a.m. until 11:00. Got gardening questions? Get answers!  Montgomery County Master Gardeners,  9020 Airport Road, Conroe . For more information, call 936-539-7824 or visit www.mcmga.com 
Monthly meetings
 
If you would like your organization's events included in "Monthly Meetings" or would like to make a change to a listed meeting, please contact us at Monthly Meetings. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details. 
 
FIRST WEEK
  
Kaufman: The Kaufman County Master Gardeners meet the first Monday of each month at the First Community Church at 1401 Trinity Drive in Crandall. January through April and August and September meetings are at 9 a.m., with the remaining meetings beginning at 7 p.m. For additional information visit http://www.kcmga.org, call 972-932-9069 or email to sbburden@ag.tamu.edu.

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu
or call 281-855-5600.

Dallas: Garden Masters, Inc., meet the first Wednesday of each month at North Haven Gardens, 7700 Northaven Rd., Dallas. The club hosts different speaker each month from 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Bring your lunch! For more information, email Bunny Williams at bunny-williams@sbcglobal.net.
 
Kerrville: Hill Country Master Gardeners meet the first Wednesday of each month at 1:00 pm at Hill Country Youth Event Center, 3785 Hwy 27. For more information visit www.hillcountrymastergardeners.org.
 
Midland/Odessa: The Permian Basin Master Gardeners meet at noon, the first Wednesday of each month, lternating between the Midland and Ector County's Extensions Offices. For more information about location, call 432-498-4071 or 432-686-4700.

Navasota: The Navasota Garden Club meets on the first Wednesday of each month (September through May) at 10:00 a.m., usually at the First Baptist Church Family Life Center, 300 Church Street, Navasota. If not meeting at the church, a change of meeting notice will be placed on the door at the North entrance. Guests are welcome. Members are from Grimes County and surrounding counties.
   
Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Atlanta: The Cass County Master Gardeners meet the first Thursday of each month at the Atlanta Memorial Hospital Conference Room, State Highway 77 @ S. Williams St., Atlanta. A business meeting is followed by an educational program. The public is welcome to attend. For additional information, call 903-756-5391 or visit http://cass.agrilife.org

Fort Worth: The Native Plant Society of Texas - North Central Chapter meets the first Thursday of each month, excluding January and July, at the Fort Worth Botanic Garden, 3220 Botanic Garden Blvd., Fort Worth. Meeting begins at 6:30 p.m., program begins at 7:00 p.m. Guest speakers present educational programs on topics of interest. Members, friends, family, guests and the public are welcome. For a list of speakers and topics or more information, visit http://www.txnativeplants.org.
 
Hempstead: The Waller County Master Gardeners usually meet at 9 a.m. the first Thursday of each month at the Waller County AgriLife Extension Office, 846 6th St., Hempstead. For more information on the meeting schedule, visit http://txmg.org/wallermg or call 979-826-7651.
 
Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners hold their monthly meeting at noon on the first Thursday of each month at 623 Fair Street, Gonzales. Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or visit http://gonzalesmastergardeners.org for more information.

New Braunfels: The Comal Garden Club meets the first Thursday of each month at 9:30 a.m. at Southbank Clubhouse, 222 Southbank Blvd., New Braunfels.

Hempstead: The Peckerwood Garden Conservation Foundation, 20559 F.M. 359, Hempstead, hosts a special Peckerwood Insider's Tour at 10 a.m. on the first Saturday of each month. Spaces are limited so pre-registration is required. $15, free for members. For more information, visit http://www.peckerwoodgarden.org/explore/visit-peckerwood-garden/.
 
SECOND WEEK
 
Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of each month (except December) at the Austin Area Garden Center, 2220 Barton Springs Road, Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.austinorganicgardeners.org.

Jacksonville: The Cherokee County Master Gardeners meet on the second Monday of each month at 9:30 a.m. at Woodmen of the World, 1800 College Ave., Jacksonville. For more information, e-mail Tom Abbott at tom@deerfield-abbey.org.

Glen Rose: The Glen Rose Garden Club meets at 10 a.m. on the second Tuesday of each month (September through May) at the Somervell County Community Center in Glen Rose. For additional information, email stringer030@yahoo.com.

Glen Rose: The Prairie Rose Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets at 6 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Somerville County Citizen Center, 209 SW Barnard St., Glen Rose. For additional information, email prairierose.npsot@gmail.com
 
Harrison County: The Harrison County Master Gardeners meet on the second Tuesday of each month in the Harrison County Annex building, 102 W Houston St. (south side of the square), Marshall. Meetings are held in the 2nd floor AgriLife Extension meeting room. For more information, call 903-935-8413, or email wannagrow2@gmail.com.   
 
Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July, August and December at St. John's Lutheran Church in Marion. Directions to St. John's Lutheran Church: From FM 78 turn south onto FM 465 and the church is just past the Marion School on the right. From IH-10 go north on FM 465 towards Marion. The Church will be on the left, just before you get to town. A plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.
 
Quitman: The Quitman Garden Club meets at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Quitman Library on E Goode Street, Quitman. It is a diverse group that welcomes all visitors. For more information, e-mail quitmangardenclub@gmail.com.
 
Denton:  The Denton County Master Gardener Association meets from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. the
second Wednesday of each month . Meetings are open to the public. For complete details, visit  http://dcmga.com/.
 
Humble: The Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, hosts a Lunch Bunch the second Wednesday of each month from noon until 2 p.m. Take a sack lunch or order a box lunch from Starbucks when you call 281-443-8731 to reserve your spot. Master Gardeners and Masters Naturalists may earn CEU credits by attending.
 
Jacksboro: The Jacksboro Garden Club meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month (except June, July and August) at the Concerned Citizens Center, 400 East Pine Street, Jacksboro. For more information, call Melinda at 940-567-6218.
 
Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association's Learn at Lunch program meet the second Wednesday of each month. The business meeting begins at 11:30 a.m., with the program at noon, at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The program is presented for horticultural education and is free to the public. For further information call 903-236-8429, visit www.txmg.org/gregg, or like us on Facebook at Gregg County Master Gardeners. 
 
Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the
second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.or g and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.
 
Woodway: The McLennan County Master Gardeners meet on the second Wednesday each month at noon at the Carleen Bright Arboretum, 9001 Bosque Blvd., Woodway. Educational programs follow the business session. For more information, call 254-757-5180.
 
Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. (social) 7:00 (meeting) the second Thursday of each month except in July in the AgriLife Extension auditorium, 1225 Pearl 2nd floor (downtown Beaumont next to the Court House). For more information contact: 409-835-8461 or txmg.org/jcmg.
 
Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Kathy Henderson at kshend@verizon.net or visit http://www.npsot.org/wp/wilco.
 
Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the
second Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the new Orange County Expo Center on Hwy 1442 in Orangefield. Enter the building in the front entrance, first door on the right, Texas AgriLife offices. Pot luck supper at 6 p.m. Visit http://txmg.org/orange for more information.

Pasadena : The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the  second Thursday of each month  at The Genoa Friendship Garden Educational Building at 1202 Genoa Red Bluff, Pasadena. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu .

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Smithville: The Smithville Community Gardens meets at 5:30 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Smithville Recreation Center. 
 
Angleton: The Brazoria County Master Gardeners meet at 11 a.m. on the second Friday of each month at the Brazoria County Extension Office, 21017 County Road 171, Angleton. There is a general business meeting followed by a brief educational program each month. For further information call 979-864-1558, ext.110.
 
College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 a.m. in the training room of the College Station Waste Water Facility building at the end of North Forest Parkway, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.
 
Houston: The Spring Branch African Violet Club meets the second Saturday of each month, January through November, at 10:30am at the Copperfield Baptist Church, 8350 Highway 6 North, Houston. Call Karla at 281-748-8417 prior to attending to confirm meeting date and time.
  
Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1:30 p.m. on the second Saturday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.
 
Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member's homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.
 
THIRD WEEK
 
Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.
 
Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardener's meet on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W Henderson, Cleburne. Meeting times are at 2 p.m. October through April, except December and at 6 p.m. May through September. An educational program precedes the business meeting. For additional information, contact Sue Matern at 817-517-9076.
  
New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. the third Monday of each month (except April and December,) at the  GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For additional information, call 830-620-3440 or visit http://txmg.org/comal/. 

Texarkana: The Four Corners Chapter of Native Plant Society of Texas meets at 7 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at the Southwest Center, 3222 W. 7th St. (U.S. 67), Texarkana. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Belinda McCoy at 903-424-7724 or blackmtngardens@yahoo.com
 
Corpus Christi: The Nueces Master Gardeners meet at noon the third Tuesday of each month, except December, at Garden Senior Center, 5325 Greely Dr., Corpus Christi. An educational program precedes the business meeting. For further information call 361 767-5217.
 
Evant: The Evant Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m., usually at the bank in downtown Evant. To confirm the date, time and place of each month's meeting, call 254-471-5860. 
 
New Braunfels: The Lindheimer Chapter (Comal County) of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the third Tuesday of each month at  6:30 pm at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. Meetings include an informative speaker and a Plant of the Month presentation. Meetings are free and visitors are welcome. For more information,visit www.npsot.org/w/lindheimer Note : there will be no meeting in June or December.
 
Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 892 Airport Rd., Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.
 
Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Knights of Columbus Hall, 702 Burney Road, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.
 
Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.
 
Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.
 
Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.
 
Brownwood: Brownwood Garden Club meets the third Thursday of each month, 11:30 a.m.- 1 p.m.  The club meetings are at Southside Baptist Church, 1219 Indian Creek Road, with refreshments and a speaker presentation. Visitors are welcome. For more information, email boeblingen@centex.net or call 817-454-8175.
 
Hallettsville: The Hallettsville Garden Club meets at 2 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month from September through May, at the Hallettsville Garden and Cultural Center, 605 E 2nd St, Hallettsville. Each month, the club hosts speakers that provide informative programs on a wide range of gardening subjects, and refreshments are provided by member hostesses after the business meeting. Visitors are welcome. Please email Sharon Harrigan at sharonspetals@yahoo.com for more information.

Houston:
The Native Plant Society of Texas - Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) at the Houston SArboretum and Nature Center in Memorial Park (4501 Woodway Dr.). For more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http:/npsot.org/wp/Houston.

San Antonio: The Bexar County Master Gardeners (BCMG) meet on the third Thursday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension Office, 3355 Cherry Ridge Dr., Suite 208, San Antonio. During the months of Jan., March, May, July, Sep. and Nov., an evening meeting begins with a social time at 6 p.m. followed by a free presentation from 6:30-8:30 p.m. During the intervening months (Feb., April, June, Aug., Oct., Dec.), afternoon educational seminars/general meetings are held from 1-3:30 p.m. Check http://www.bexarmg.org/ to verify meeting date for any given month, as circumstances could require a change, and to find information on the speaker and topic scheduled for each meeting.
 
Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 6:30 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, at the AgriLife Building, 210 East Live Oak, Seguin. After a brief social hour, the meeting and guest speaker begins at 7 p.m. The meeting is free and open to the public. For additional information, call 830-303-3889 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

Hempstead: The Peckerwood Garden Conservation Foundation, 20559 F.M. 359, Hempstead, hosts the Evening at Peckerwood Lecture series at 7 p.m. on the third Friday of each month. Tickets are available online. Tickets are $10, $5 for members.For more information, visit http://www.peckerwoodgarden.org/explore/visit-peckerwood-garden/.

FOURTH WEEK
 
Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.
 
Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardeners, a program of Texas AgriLife Extension, meet the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. There is a public gardening program at each meeting and pertinent information may be found at brazosmg.com or 979-823-0129.
 
Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.
 
Linden: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the senior citizens building at 507 S Kaufman St. in Linden at 6:30. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Karen Tromza at khtromza@yahoo.com.
 
Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Deborah Beggs Moncrief Garden Center, 3220 Botanic Blvd., Ft. Worth. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.
 
San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or email npsot.sanantonio@gmail.com.
 
Houston: The Houston Native Prairie Association meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Wednesday of each month at the Cherie Flores Pavilion in McGovern Centennial Gardens at Hermann Park, 1500 Hermann Drive, Houston. For more information, contact hnpat@prairies.org.

Austin: The Garden Club of Austin meets at Zilker Botanical Gardens auditorium, 2220 Barton Springs Rd., Austin, at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month. 7:00-7:30 p.m. Refreshments and Social, followed by a presentation at 7:30 p.m. Free. For additional information, visit http://thegardenclubofaustin.org/.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the community room behind the Greater Texas Federal Credit Union,1300 N. Bell, Cedar Park, unless there is special event planned. Following a program and short business meeting, we share a pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call president Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email info@leandergc.org.
 
Dallas: The Dallas County Master Gardeners meet the fourth Thursday of each month at 11:30 a.m. For location and program information, visit h ttp://www.dallascountymastergardeners.org/ or contact The Helpdesk, M-F, 8 to 4:30 214-904-3053.
 
Dallas: The Greater Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the REI, 4515 LBJ Freeway, Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.gdogc.org.
  
Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817-483-7746.

Hempstead: The Peckerwood Garden Conservation Foundation, 20559 F.M. 359, Hempstead, holds an Open Day, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. on the fourth Saturday of each month. Tours start at 10 a.m. and the last tour leaves at 2 p.m. Tickets available online or at the gate. $10, free for members. For more information, visit http://www.peckerwoodgarden.org/explore/visit-peckerwood-garden/.
 
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