N.C. Cooperative Extension - Forsyth County Center logo  
 
Forsyth Community Gardening Logo
  THE BULLETIN BOARD
JULY / AUGUST 2018     
Para leer este boletín en español, por favor vea más abajo. ¡Gracias!
IN THIS EDITION

Upcoming Extension Programs

Crop Planning & Autumn Gardens July 17, 6:00-8:00 pm
Heirloom Tomatoes July 18, 11:00 am-12:00 pm
Identifying and Controlling Animal Pests in the Garden August 1, 11:00 am-12:00 pm
In the Garden

Beat Blossom End-Rot of Tomatoes
Watering Tips
Planning your Fall Garden

FIELD NOTES
It's officially summer, so I hope that you're all enjoying some fresh veggies from your gardens!  This edition of the Bulletin Board has tips for keeping your summer crops healthy and planning for a fall garden.  Given the hot, dry weather, proper watering is important for overall crop health and to prevent problems like blossom end rot of tomato.  For more tips on watering well, see "In the Garden" (below).  I also encourage gardeners to start thinking about what you'd like to plant for a fall harvest.  To help you get started, please join us for a "Crop Planning and Autumn Gardens" workshop on July 17.  This is a great opportunity to learn how to extend your harvest into the cool months!  Happy watering, harvesting, and garden-planning!

Thanks for all you do to help our community grow!

Community Gardening Coordinator,  
N.C. Cooperative Extension, Forsyth County Center

UPCOMING EXTENSION PROGRAMS
Parsley lettuce and carrot plants in a raised garden bed.
Crop Planning & Autumn Gardens

Tuesday, July 17, 6:00-8:00 pm
Catholic Charities 
(1612 14th St NE, Winston-Salem NC 27105)
Please register online or call 336-703-2850.


Spanish interpretation will be available! Please call 336-705-8823 by July 16 so that we can bring enough headsets.

What's the best time of year to plant tomatoes? Can I really harvest fresh greens through November? How can I enrich my garden soil over the winter? Come find the answers to these questions and more at this workshop on crop planning!
 
Megan Gregory, Community Gardening Coordinator with N.C. Cooperative Extension, will discuss when to plant different vegetables and cover crops, and how to create crop rotations that keep your soil enriched and reduce disease problems. We will tour summer plantings at Catholic Charities' garden, discuss what can be planted in the fall, and demonstrate how to build a low tunnel to keep greens growing into the winter. Participants will create a fall crop plan. You are encouraged to bring a diagram of your planting areas and records of what has been planted in each bed over the past few years.

Red yellow and purple tomatoes of different sizes and shapes in a colander
Heirloom Tomatoes

Wednesday, July 18, 11:00 am-12:00 pm
Tanglewood Arboretum Office 
(4201 Manor House Circle, Clemmons, NC 27012)
Registration opens July 6.  Please register by email or call 336-703-2850.

Learn about the characteristics of heirloom tomatoes and how to grow them.  Samples of tomatoes will be available to taste.  Tracy Lounsbury, Local Grower, will present the program.

Identification and Control of Animal Pests in the Garden

Woodchuck - a formidable foe of vegetable gardeners!
A woodchuck -- formidable foe of vegetable gardeners!  Photo: B. Marshall, Sault College, Bugwood.org.  CC-BY 3.0.
 
Wednesday, August 1, 11:00 am-12:00 pm
Tanglewood Arboretum Office 
(4201 Manor House Circle, Clemmons, NC 27012)
Registration opens July 18.  Please register by email or call 336-703-2850.

Identify animal pests in the garden by their habits and learn how to properly control the destruction they may cause. Scott McNeely, of McNeely Pest Control, will present the program.

IN THE GARDEN
Beat Blossom End Rot of Tomatoes

Tomatoes with blossom end rot.
Tomatoes with blossom end rot. Photo: B. Kennedy, U of KY, Bugwood.org. CC-BY 3.0.
Have you ever had black spots rot the bottom of your tomatoes - just when they were getting big and ready to ripen?  This is blossom end rot, and it can occur in tomato, pepper, eggplant, squash, and watermelon.  It's caused by calcium deficiency in the developing fruit, but this doesn't necessarily mean that your soil doesn't have enough calcium.  In most cases, blossom end rot occurs because the plant can't take up calcium due to dry conditions and irregular watering (remember, plants take up nutrients dissolved in water!), or a low soil pH (which can 'tie up' nutrients).  Here are some tips to prevent blossom end rot:
  • Keep your soil at a pH of 6.5 - 6.8.  Get a soil test each fall, and incorporate lime if it is recommended to bring up the soil pH by Spring.  The Soil Test Interpretation Worksheet can help you determine how much lime to apply, if needed.
  • Water regularly and deeply to maintain soil moisture 6-8 inches down (see below for detailed watering tips).  Fruiting crops will need at least 1.5 inches of water per week during the hottest months.
  • Apply a 3'' layer of straw mulch around your plants to conserve moisture.
  • Avoid ammonium-based fertilizers (e.g., ammonium nitrate) or excessive potassium or magnesium fertilizers.  These can 'compete' with calcium for uptake by the plant.
  • If your soil is lacking calcium, you can incorporate gypsum (calcium sulfate) at rates of 1-2 lbs per 100 square feet.
If you do see blossom end rot, remove these fruits.  The rotted area may allow disease-causing bacteria or fungus to enter the plant.  If you correct the conditions that caused the problem (e.g., by watering regularly), new fruits should develop properly.
 
For more information on blossom end rot (and just about anything else that could be wrong with your tomatoes), see "Tomato Diseases and Disorders" from Clemson University.

Garden with beans tomatoes Malabar spinach and squash plants surrounded by straw mulch covering the soil.
Use a 3'' layer of straw mulch to cover the soil around your plants. This will conserve moisture and keep weeds down.
Watering Tips

As we enter the hottest months of the year, proper irrigation will help your veggies thrive and produce.  Here are some 'rules of thumb' for watering vegetables:
  • For seeds and transplants, keep the top 3-4 inches of soil moist.  You may need to water daily.
  • Established vegetables should be watered deeply three times per week (by Mother Nature or by you!) with about one-half inch of water each time (~10 gallons per 8' x 4' area).  The soil should be moist 6-8 inches down.
  • Water at the base of your plants using drip irrigation or a wand attached to a hose.  Avoid wetting the foliage, as this promotes disease.
  • Water in early morning to allow leaves to dry out before evening.
  • To conserve water, apply a 3'' layer of straw mulch to cover bare soil, and work to increase soil organic matter levels with cover crops and compost (this helps the soil hold more water).
To learn more, check out "How to Water Vegetables and Herbs" from N.C. Cooperative Extension, and "Irrigating the Home Garden" from VA Cooperative Extension.

Collard plants in late fall with a crimson clover cover crop under-seeded.
Collards, a Brassica-family crop, should be grown from transplants. Seeds should be started in flats in late July for transplanting in early- to mid-September.
Planning your Fall Garden

Now is the time to think about late-summer plantings for a fall harvest, choose your varieties, and get seeds!  

Most cool-season crops can be sown outdoors or transplanted from August 15 - September 15.  You can direct-seed beets, carrots, kohlrabi, lettuce, mustard greens, peas, radishes, spinach, and turnips.  Crops that should be grown from transplants include broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, kale, and Swiss chard.  If you grow your own transplants from seed, you'll want to sow your flats near the end of July or beginning of August.  

For more information on planting dates and spacing, see "A Piedmont Garden Calendar" (also available in Spanish) and "Fall Gardens for the Piedmont." 

DO YOU HAVE A GARDEN DIRECTORY UPDATE?
Excerpt of map showing locations of community gardens in Forsyth County Has your garden contact person or workday schedule changed?  Please help us keep our Garden Map and Directory updated so we can connect gardeners and volunteers with opportunities to get involved!  Here's how you can help:
 
1) REVIEW your garden's entry in the Garden Directory to see if all information is complete and current.
2) To ADD your garden to the list or UPDATE an existing entry, fill out the Garden Directory Update Form.  Thank you!

 
N.C. Cooperative Extension, Forsyth County Center
1450 Fairchild Road,Winston-Salem, NC 27105
336-703-2850

*     *     *     *     *     *     *
Accommodation requests related to a disability should be made at least 10 days prior to the event by contacting Kim Gressley, County Extension Director, at (336) 703-2850 or by email at ksgressl@ncsu.edu. 
 
*     *     *     *     *     *     *
 NC State University and N.C. A&T State University are collectively committed to positive action to secure equal opportunity and prohibit discrimination and harassment regardless of age, color, disability, family and marital status, gender identity, genetic information, national origin, political beliefs, race, religion, sex (including pregnancy), sexual orientation and veteran status. NC State, N.C. A&T, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and local governments cooperating.  
 
EN ESTE BOLETÍN

Programas Próximos de la Extensión

Planeación de Cultivos y Huertos del Otoño 17 de julio, 6:00-8:00 pm
Tomates 'Heirloom' (tradicionales) 18 de julio, 11:00 am-12:00 pm
Identificación y Control de Plagas de Animales en el Jardín 1 de agosto, 11:00 am-12:00 pm
En el Huerto

Prevenga la Pudrición Apical de los Tomates
Consejos sobre el Riego
Planeando su Huerto del Otoño

NOTAS DEL CAMPO
Ya es verano, así que ¡espero que todos estén disfrutando algunas verduras frescas de sus huertos!  Esta edición del boletín contiene consejos para mantener saludables sus cultivos del verano y planear un huerto del otoño. Dado el tiempo cálido y seco, el riego adecuado es importante para la salud general de los cultivos y para evitar problemas como la pudrición apical del tomate. Para obtener más consejos sobre cómo regar bien, consulte "En el Huerto" (abajo). También aliento a los horticultores a que comiencen a pensar en lo que les gustaría plantar para una cosecha del otoño. Para ayudarle a comenzar, por favor únase a nosotros para un taller sobre la "Planeación de los Cultivos y Huertos del Otoño" el 17 de julio. ¡Es una gran oportunidad para aprender cómo se puede extender su cosecha hasta los meses fríos! ¡Disfruten del riego, la cosecha y la planeación de su huerto!

¡Gracias por todo que hace para mejorar nuestra comunidad!

Coordinadora de Huertos Comunitarios 
Extensión Cooperativa de N.C., Centro del Condado de Forsyth

PROGRAMAS PRÓXIMOS  DE LA EXTENSIÓN
Parsley lettuce and carrot plants in a raised garden bed.
Planeación de Cultivos y Huertos del Otoño

martes, 17 de julio, 6:00-8:00 pm
Catholic Charities 
(1612 14th St NE, Winston-Salem NC 27105).  
Por favor, inscríbase en lí­nea o llame al 336-703-2850.

¡Habrá interpretación en español!  Por favor, llame al 336-705-8823 antes del 16 de julio para que podamos llevar suficientes auriculares.

¿Cuál es la mejor temporada para plantar tomates? ¿Realmente puedo cosechar verduras de hoja verde hasta noviembre? ¿Cómo puedo enriquecer la tierra del huerto durante el invierno?   ¡Venga a aprender las respuestas a estas preguntas y más en este taller sobre planeación de cultivos!
 
Megan Gregory, Coordinadora de Huertos Comunitarios con la Extensión Cooperativa de Carolina del Norte, compartirá cuándo se debe sembrar varias hortalizas y cultivos de cobertura, y cómo crear rotaciones de cultivos que enriquezcan su tierra y reduzcan los problemas de enfermedades.  Recorreremos las hortalizas del verano en el huerto de Catholic Charities, discutiremos qué se puede sembrar en el otoño, y demostraremos cómo construir un túnel bajo para extender la cosecha hasta el invierno.  Los participantes harán un plan de cultivos para el otoño.  Le recomendamos que traiga un diagrama de sus áreas de plantación y notas sobre lo que se ha plantado en cada cama en los últimos años.

Red yellow and purple tomatoes of different sizes and shapes in a colander
Tomates 'Heirloom' (tradicionales)

miércoles, 18 de julio, 11:00 am-12:00 pm
Oficina del Arboreto Tanglewood 
(4201 Manor House Circle, Clemmons, NC 27012)
La inscripción abre el 6 de julio.  
Por favor, inscríbase por correo electrónico o llame al 336-703-2850.

Conozca las características de los tomates 'heirloom' (tradicionales) y cómo cultivarlos. Habrán muestras de tomates para probar. Tracy Lounsbury, Agricultor Local, presentará el programa.

Identificación y Control de Plagas de Animales en el Jardín

Woodchuck - a formidable foe of vegetable gardeners!
Una marmota, ¡enemigo de los horticultores! F oto: B. Marshall, Sault College, Bugwood.org.  CC-BY 3.0.
 
miércoles, 1 de agosto, 11:00 am-12:00 pm
Oficina del Arboreto Tanglewood  (4201 Manor House Circle, Clemmons, NC 27012)
La inscripción abre el 18 de julio.  
Por favor, inscrí­base por correo electrónico o llame al 336-703-2850.

Identifique las plagas de animales en el jardín según sus hábitos y aprenda cómo controlar la destrucción que pueden causar. Scott McNeely, de McNeely Pest Control, presentará el programa.

EN EL HUERTO
Prevenga la Pudrición Apical de los Tomates

Tomatoes with blossom end rot.
Tomates con pudrición apical.  Foto: B. Kennedy, U of KY, Bugwood.org. CC-BY 3.0.
¿Alguna vez ha visto manchas negras que pudren la parte inferior de sus tomates, justo cuando estaban poniéndose grandes?  Esta es la pudrición apical, y puede ocurrir en tomate, pimiento, berenjena, calabaza y sandía.  La causa es una deficiencia de calcio en la fruta cuando está desarrollando, pero esto no significa necesariamente que su tierra no tenga calcio suficiente.  En la mayoría de los casos, la pudrición apical ocurre porque la planta no puede absorber calcio debido a las condiciones secas y el riego irregular (¡recuerde, las plantas absorben nutrientes disueltos en agua!), o un pH bajo de la tierra (que puede "atrapar" nutrientes).  Aquí hay algunos consejos para prevenir la pudrición apical:
  • Mantenga su tierra a un pH de 6.5 - 6.8. Haga un análisis de la tierra cada otoño, e incorpore cal si se recomienda para aumentar el pH del suelo antes de la primavera. La hoja de trabajo "Interpretación del Análisis de la Tierra" puede ayudarle a determinar la cantidad de cal para aplicar, si es necesario.
  • Riegue regularmente y profundamente para mantener la humedad de la tierra hasta una profundidad de 6 a 8 pulgadas (consulte a continuación para obtener consejos detallados sobre el riego). Los cultivos fructíferos necesitarán al menos 1.5 pulgadas de agua por semana durante los meses más calorosos.
  • Aplique una capa de mulch (mantillo) de paja de 3'' alrededor de sus plantas para conservar la humedad.
  • Evite los fertilizantes a base de amonio (por ejemplo, nitrato de amonio) o los fertilizantes excesivos de potasio o magnesio. Estos pueden 'competir' con el calcio para ser absorbidos por la planta.
  • Si a su tierra le falta calcio, puede incorporar aljez (sulfato de calcio; en inglés, 'gypsum') a una tasa de 1-2 lbs por cada 100 pies cuadrados.
Si ve la pudrición apical, quite estas frutas. El área podrida puede permitir que las bacterias u hongos que causan enfermedades entren en la planta. Si corrige las condiciones que causaron el problema (por ejemplo, al regar regularmente), las frutas nuevas se deben desarrollar adecuadamente.
 
Para obtener más información sobre la pudrición apical, (y casi cualquier otra cosa que podría estar mal con los tomates), vea "Enfermedades y Desórdenes del Tomate" de la Universidad de Clemson.

Garden with beans tomatoes Malabar spinach and squash plants surrounded by straw mulch covering the soil.
Use una capa de 3'' de 'mulch' (mantillo) de paja para cubrir la tierra alrededor de sus plantas.  Esto conservará la humedad de la tierra y controlará las malas hierbas.
Consejos sobre el Riego

Mientras entramos los meses más calorosos del año, el riego adecuado ayudará que sus hortalizas prosperen y produzcan.  Aquí hay algunos consejos para el riego de hortalizas:
  • Para las semillas y trasplantes, mantenga húmedas las 3-4 pulgadas superiores de la tierra.  Es probable que tenga que regar todos los días.  
  • A las hortalizas establecidas deben regarse profundamente tres veces por semana (¡ya sea la lluvia o Ud.!) con una media pulgada de agua cada vez (~10 galones por un área de 8' x 4').  La tierra debe estar húmeda a una profundidad de 6-8 pulgadas.
  • Riegue en la base de sus plantas usando el riego por goteo o una vara conectada a una manguera.  NO moje las hojas de las plantas, ya que esto promueve a las enfermedades.
  • Riegue temprano en la mañana para que las hojas se sequen antes de la noche.
  • Para conservar el agua, aplique una capa de 3'' de 'mulch' (mantillo) de paja, y trabaje a aumentar el contenido de materia orgánica en la tierra con cultivos de cobertura y el compostaje (esto ayuda a que el suelo retenga más agua). 
Para aprender más, eche un vistazo a "Cómo Regar Hortalizas y Hierbas" de la Extensión Cooperativa de N.C. y "Regando el Huerto Casero" de la Extensión Cooperativa de VA.

Collard plants in late fall with a crimson clover cover crop under-seeded.
El col (collards), un cultivo de la familia Brassica, deben cultivarse a partir de trasplantes. Se deben sembrar las semillas en macetas a finales de julio para trasplantar a principios hasta mediados de septiembre.
Planeando su Huerto del Otoño

¡Ya es tiempo pensar en lo que se va a sembrar a finales del verano para cosechar en el otoño, elegir sus variedades, y obtener semillas!  
 
La mayoría de los cultivos de la temporada fresca se pueden sembrar o trasplantarse del 15 de agosto al 15 de septiembre. Los cultivos que se pueden sembrar directamente de la semilla incluyen remolachas, zanahorias, colinabos, lechugas, hojas de mostaza, guisantes, rábanos, espinacas, y nabos. Los cultivos que deben cultivarse a partir de los trasplantes incluyen brócoli, repollo, coliflor, berza, col rizada, y acelga Suiza.  Si cultiva sus propios trasplantes de semilla, se debe sembrar las macetas a fines de julio o comienzos de agosto. 
 
Para más información sobre fechas de siembra, y espaciamiento, vea los folletos "El Calendario del Huerto en NC" (también disponible en inglés) y "Fall Gardens for the Piedmont." 

¿TIENE NUEVA INFORMACIÓN 
PARA EL DIRECTORIO DE HUERTOS?
Excerpt of map showing locations of community gardens in Forsyth County
¿Ha cambiado la persona de contacto para su huerto, o sus horario de días de trabajo?  Por favor, ayúdenos a mantener nuestro Mapa y Directorio de Huertos actualizado, para que podamos conectar a los horticultores y voluntarios con oportunidades para involucrarse.  Ud. puede ayudar haciendo lo siguiente:
 
1) VEA la entrada de su huerto en el Directorio de Huertos para ver si toda la información es correcta.
2) Para AGREGAR su huerto a la lista o ACTUALIZAR una entrada existente, llene el Formulario para Actualizar el Directorio de Huertos ("Garden Directory Update Form").  ¡Gracias!

Extensión Cooperativa de Carolina del Norte, Condado de Forsyth 
1450 Fairchild Road,Winston-Salem, NC 27105
336-703-2850

*     *     *     *     *     *     *
Las solicitudes de adaptaciones relacionadas con una discapacidad se deben hacer  por lo menos 10 días antes del evento poniéndose en contacto con Kim Gressley, Director de Extensión del Condado, al (336) 703-2850 o por correo electrónico a ksgressl@ncsu.edu.
 
*     *     *     *     *     *     *
Las universidades NC State y N.C. A&T están comprometidas colectivamente a llevar a cabo acciones positivas para asegurar la igualdad de oportunidades y prohibir la discriminación y el acoso independientemente de la raza, el color de la piel, el país de origen, la religión, la ideología política, el estado civil y situación familiar, el sexo, la edad, la condición de veterano de guerra, la identidad sexual, la orientación sexual, la información genética o la discapacidad de la persona. Colaboración entre las Universidades NC State y N.C. A&T, el Departamento de Agricultura de los Estados Unidos, y los gobiernos locales.