Updates from Unitarian Universalists forJewish Awareness

Welcome UUJA members and friends. Happy Hanukkah, Happy Thanksgiving and Happy Holidays to you and your family.  In this issue of the Unitarian Universalists for Jewish Awareness newsletter you will find many exciting updated and new offerings. Enjoy!!
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In This Issue
Jewish Voices in Unitarian Universalism 


From Beacon Press two new books -

Being Both by Susan Katz Miller - is at once a rousing declaration of the benefits of celebrating two religions, and a blueprint for interfaith families who are seeking guidance and community support.
 
Sons of Abraham by Rabbi Marc Schneier and Imam Shamsi Ali tells the story of how Schneier and Ali became friends and challenges Jews and Muslims to step out of their comfort zones, find common ground in their shared Abrahamic traditions, and stand together and fight for a better world for all. 
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UUJA Gathering March 14-16 in Morristown, New Jersey
Coming soon: All the program details for the major national gathering of UUs for Jewish Awareness and our allies-March 14-16 in Morristown New Jersey. Featuring the editors and contributors to the upcoming Jewish Voices in Unitarian Universalism (Skinner House Jan. 2014), workshops, worship, singing, dancing, and conversations about Jewish identity, Judaism as a source tradition, Tikkun Olam and social justice, and the pluses and challenges of this hyphenated status in our faith tradition. Save these dates!"
An Article you may find of interest --
From Sightings, published October 7, 2013 by The Martin Marty Center for the Advanced Study of Religion at the University of Chicago Divinity School. 
 
There are more Lutherans (5.5 million) in Tanzania than there are Jews (5.4 million) in the United States. There are more Southern Baptists in the United States than there are Jews in the whole world. While religions are by no means to be valued on the basis of numbers, the loss of believers, adherents, participants, and congregants in a faith-community as large as Judaism's, is felt by those who remain in the "core." Jews in that "core" and non-Jews alike were startled by poll data-the most massive in a dozen years-from the Pew Research Center's Religion and Public Life Project's findings released last month. more 
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