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Broadcasting as a Community Service  

91 .3FM
 


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WWUH 91.3 FM
Program Guide
July/August, 2018
In This Issue
WWUH Celebrates 50 Years
Hartford Circus Fire
Blue Monday Specials
Hosts Needed
Flashback:1973
Public Affairs on WWUH
Classical Music on WWUH
Sunday Afternoon at the Opera
WWUH Archive Now Online
How To Listen
Join Our List
 
WWUH - Your Live, Local, Listener-Supported Station
 
 
      WWUH turns 50 this year having signed on for the first time on July 15, 1968.  We have lots of exciting anniversary-related events planned for the fall that we will tell you about in the next issue. 
      At 4:30pm on Sunday, 7/15 we will be airing a special 30 minute documentary about our early years produced by volunteer Brandon Kampe.  
    
     
John Ramsey
General Manager

The Hartford Circus Fire
A Documentary
 
             
Circus Fire Memorial Park
Hartford Circus Fire Memorial
 

  July 6th makes the 74 anniversary of the Hartford Circus Fire tragedy which injured over 700 and resulted in the deaths of 167 people.  On Friday, July 6th at 12:30 pm we will air an excellent 90-minute documentary on the Hartford Circus Fire produced by volunteer Brandon Kampe.



Blue Monday
9 PM to midnight
hosted by Bart Bozzi
 
Tune in to Blue Monday during July and August, 2018 for the following features:
 
Featured Artist

July 2 Fleetwood Mac
July 9 Preston Shannon (1947 - 2018)
July 23 Mike Zito
July 30 Omar And The Howlers
August 6 Peter Green   
August 20 Little Sammy Davis (1928 - 2018)                                      August 27 Lou Ann Barton

Back to the Roots

July 2 Classic Women Blues Singers
July 9 British Blues
July 23 Memphis Blues
July 30 Rhythm & Blues
August 6 Boogie Woogie
August 20 Jump Blues
August 27 Delta Blues

Tune in as we also go back in my blues history, featuring a cut I aired 20 and 10 years ago on my weekly blues shows previously aired on Blue Monday.
 
Join me as we explore the diverse and interesting world of "the blues" every Monday night at 9 PM on WWUH's long running blues show, since 1980, "Blue Monday".
 
Have An Idea for A Program?
 

If you have an idea for a radio program and are available to volunteer late at night, please let us know.

We may have some midnight and/or 3am slots available later this year.  Email station manager  John Ramsey to find out more about this unique and exciting opportunity for the right person.

Qualified candidates will have access to the full WWUH programmer orientation program so no experience is necessary. He/she will also need to attend the monthly WWUH staff meetings (held on Tuesday or Sunday evenings) and do behind the scenes volunteer work from time to time. This is a volunteer position.

After completing this process, we will review the candidate's assets and accomplishments and they will be considered for any open slots in our schedule.


 

  FLASHBACK: Year - 1973

Excerpt from "Insight into WWUH, Semester Report, December, 1973"
 by Phil Cabot, General Manager


    First semester was a period of change at WWUH.  First the constitution was changed to correct many discrepancies.  Second, three members of the station were elected to the executive committee.

    One area of great change was Engineering.  The engineering department under the guidance of Charles Allen, Chief Engineer, and Stew Yager, Assistant Chief, has been extremely busy this semester.  The department has been responsible for the studio renovation which was been started.  Along with the aid of Ed Nelson, Professor at Ward, the studio renovation when completed will make WWUH's facilities one of the best college radio facilities around.  Although we are still tight for space, we have re-designed the studios for the most optimum use.  This includes a combination talk studio and production studio which will be used for producing those much needed educational programs, a completely remodeled FM studio and a news booth.  Also the department is still working to move the transmitter to WTIC's facility on Avon Mountain. If approved by the FCC this move will be made this spring and as a result WWUH will be the most powerful educational station in CT.

        As always our primary concern is that of programming.  Roger Stauss, Program Director, is attempting to attain our goal for more educational programming.  Once this goal is achieved WWUH will truly become the "Voice of the University of Hartford."  Roger is attempting to get more participation on the part of the University community.  One example of what has already started are the threatre reviews done by John Balmer, Prof. in the Comm and Theater Departments.  Mr. Balmer has been reviewing several plays around the area and makes very knowledgeable comments on each.  Roger and I both feel that the university community is comprised of so many valuable human resources that the limit to our educational programming is virtually non-existent.  WWUH has also been using many educational tape networks including Pacifica, National Public Radio and the BBC.

    During Marathon last year the Student Association generously donated $2000 for the replacement and enlargement of the record library.  Jim Shanahan, music director, has been busy at work ordering records and it is expected that we will have one of the finest record libraries when he is finished.

    One thing that I have been very interested in, for public affairs, is the installation of a line into the state capitol in Hartford.  If we are able to install this line we will be able to broadcast different sessions of the legislature which are of particular interest to the Hartford community. This is another example of our continued interest for more public service programming.

    Have you ever wished you could talk back to your radio?  Well soon you will be able to.  Roger Stauss and I are planning to conduct a telephone talk show that will enable our listeners to do just that.  Listeners will be able to ask questions, suggest ideas, and state opinions regarding WWUH.  We need this kind of feedback in order to become a community minded station.

    The ideas that Roger and his staff have come up with assure me that WWUH will be growing in the direction which will make the university very impressed and excited.  Eventually we hope that WWUH will be one of the major public relations outlets of the university.

    Unfortunately, unlike the rest of the station, we are weak financially.  (The audit of our accounts) prepared by Business Manager Michael Ditkoff (shows) we have already been forced to spend a substantial portion of this year's budget.  However the excess spending has been forecast due to the many important and expensive projects which had been planned for this year including the renovation and the move.   Although this puts a financial strain on the rest of the station we feel that these projects were very necessary in order to improve and maintain WWUH.

    A new department which has been formed at WWUH is that of development.  Under the guidance of Judy Corcoran, this department is responsible for the continued growth of WWUH.  This department is also responsible for the Program Guide, Personnel and Public Relations.

    Although the Program Guide is still in financially poor shape, we feel this is one of the more important products of WWUH and is worth running at a deficit to maintain.  Terry Sobestanovich, Program Guide Editor, is attempting to increase advertising and subscriptions to the Guide.

    The personnel of WWUH has been substantially increased this year.   We now have more than forty active members and associate members at the station.  Judy and I are both very happy with this large turn out and hope the personnel department continues to grow.

    Judy and her public relations department have been very busy this semester.  Not only have we been advertising on twenty three busses throughout the area, our Newington Children's Hospital Drive brought the University and our station very good publicity.  WDRC presented a half h our program on this drive alobng with a five minute presentation on channel 3.  Channel 30 and WTIC radio both publicized the event and there were articles in the Hartford Courant and the Times.

    One of the most exciting departments this year has been the News Department.  Under the leadership of Andy Brownstein, News Director, the news department has started on the road to becoming one of the best news departments in the state.  One of Andy's primary concerns is to go out and get many actualities throughout CT.  This was evident during the recent elections when student reporters were sent to cover the visits of Sen. McGovern, Sargent Shriver, VP Agnew and Senator Kennedy.  As one who took part in covering some of these events I feel that not only are these events interesting to cover but also very educational.

    Andy, who took over the department early in the semester, has also held a seminar in news reporting for his staff with Paul Kuntz, News Director of WTIC as a guest speaker.  This is one example how professionals from throughout CT are willing to help train our staff.

    Andy also realizes the importance of using other news sources besides the UPI and has started using newspapers and experimenting with other news services such as "Earth News."

    Continuing with our goal for community involvement Andy has started a program of training and using high school students in the Hartford area to do news.  Not only does this interest them in our station, but also in the univ. and the field of broadcasting.  Programs such as these benefit everyone involved.

    Another idea that was instituted by the News staff was the formation of a booklet with all faculty of the university listed and their main field of interest.  This booklet will enable the department to contact "experts" when news stories need further investigation.  
  
    I have been very impressed with what Andy and his department have achieved and look forward to a great news department.

    One department which has always been of great concern to me has been that of minority affairs.  When the Constitution of WWUH was changed earlier this year this department was put onto the Executive Committee.  This alone was one of the station's most worthwhile achievements.  Anne Harte, who was elected director of this department, hopes to increase minority involvement int he station and to increase minority educational programming.  Already this year Dr. Umunna, Professor in the Black Studies Program, has started an African program once per week and has received several letters praising the show.  Also, a Jamaican program has been presented once per week. Several tapes from our tape networks have also dealt with minority subjects.

    Another area of minority affairs I have asked Anne to look into is some kind of exchange program with Weaver High School.  Weaver has started a station of their own and perhaps why could use some help with their station.  I feel that we Weaver nearby it is very important to start programs such as these.

    With the aid of Tricia Beatty, Operations Director, I have been attempting to make WWUH a station the university can be proud of.  Being owned by the Board of Regents, we realize the importance of university and community involvement in WWUH.  Tricia and I are attempting to set up a Connecticut College Broadcasting Association which will enable all member stations to use each others programs.  This will allow WWUH to present some of its educational programs elsewhere in the state.  Also Clark Smidt, who is now FM Coordinator for WBZ in Boston, has informed us that eventually he would like to use some of our educational programming on WBZ.  This would help spread the university's voice throughout New England.  Another project I am working on, with Roger Stauss, is a survey of FM broadcasting in CT.  This survey will aid in in determining what is needed in the way of programming on FM.

    WWUH continues to present editorial opinions on controversial subjects, including the elections and the incident at Baton Rouge.  As a "public service" media we feel editorial opinions are very important.

    Dr. Daniel Viamonte, Chairman of the Comm and Theater Dept, has also started a program whereby students taking an introductory communications course are able to receive credit for a lab conducted at our station.  We feel this is one more way in which the university can use the facilities of our station.

    "It has been a very busy semester at WWUH and as you can see by this report a very beneficial one.  I hope you have found this report to be of interest and look forward to any comments you may have.

      
Public Affairs on WWUH
Real Alternative News
 
For 50 years WWUH has aired a variety of unique community affairs programs.

Here is our current schedule:
Monday: Noon - 1pm  Alternative Radio
  8:00 - 9:00 pm  Radio Ecoshock
Tuesday:  Noon - 12:30 pm  New World Notes
   12:30 -  1:00 pm  Counterspin
    8:00 - 9:00 pm  Black Agenda Report
Wednesday:  Noon - 12:30 pm  911 Wake Up Call
                 12:30 - 1:00 pm   Building Bridges
           8:00 - 8:30 pm  911 Wake Up Call
           8:30 - 9:00 pm  New World Notes
Thursday:   Noon - 1:00 pm  Project Censored
                  7:30 - 8:00 pm  Making Contact
                  8:00 - 8:30 pm  This Way Out
                  8:30 - 9:00 pm Gay Spirit
Friday:        12:00 - 12:30 pm  New Focus
                  12:30 - 1:00 pm  TUC Radio
Sunday:      4:30 - 5:00 pm  Nutmeg Chatter
 

WWUH Classical Programming - July/August 2018
Sunday Afternoon at the Opera... Sundays 1:00 - 4:30 pm
Evening Classics... Weekdays 4:00 to 7:00/ 8:00 pm
Drake's Village Brass Band... Mondays 7:00-8:00 pm

July
Sun
1
Bernstein: Candide
Mon
2
Schuman: American Festival Overture; Ives: Fourth of July; Bernstein: A White House Cantata (Bernstein 100)
Boyer: Ellis Island "Dream of America"
Drake's Village Brass Band... United States Coast Guard Band - American Journey
Tue
3
Georg Philipp Telemann: Ouverture Suite in E Minor, TWV 55:e8 'l'Omphale'; George Rochberg (July 5, 1918 - May 29, 2005): String Quartet No. 3 (1971); J. S. Bach: Cantata for the 5th Sunday after Trinity [Trinity 5] BWV 93 'Wer nur den lieben Gott laesst walten' (1724); Douglas Lilburn: Drysdale Overture and A Song of Islands; Nicola (Antonio) Porpora (1686-1768): Violin Sonata No. 7 in F major (1754); Louise Farrenc: Piano Quintet No. 2 in E major, Op. 31; Robert Simpson: Symphony No. 11 (1990); Couperin: Pieces de clavecin, Book 1 (1713): 5th Ordre in A major-minor (selections)
Wed
4
Daugherty: Metropolis Symphony; Dello Joio: Piano Sonata; Glazunov: Violin Concerto; Corelli: Trio Sonatas; Medieval Scottish Hymns
Thu
5
Kalinnikov: Serenade for Strings; Chopin: Scherzo #1 in b Op. 20; Crotch: Symphony in E Flat; Holbrooke: Ulalume - Poem for Orchestra #3 Op. 35; Andreae: Piano Trio Op. 1; Gaubert: Madrigal; Jacob: William Byrd Suite; Rochberg: Caprice Variations
Fri
6
Lord of the Rings goes symphonic
Sun
8
Offenbach: La Grande Duchesse de Gerolstein
Mon
9
Host's Choice; Drake's Village Brass Band and Final Hour of A Musical Odyssey Pre-Empted for Live Jazz from Bushnell Park
Tue
10
Arensky: Piano Trio in d, Op. 52; Haydn: String Quartet in C, Op 20, No. 2; Schumann: Piano Quintet in E , Op. 44; Liszt: Eine Faust-Symphonie
Wed
11
Mozart: Symphony No. 30; Payette: Songs; Paganini: Caprices; Saint-Saens: Piano Concerto; Henze: Piano Concerto
Thu
12
Encina: Oy comamos y bebamos; Dall'abaco: Concerto a più istrumenti in C Op. 5 No. 5, Concerto a quattro da chiesa Op. 2 No. 1 in d; Arensky: Suite for 2 Pianos No. 1 Op. 15; Butterworth: A Shropshire Lad - Rhapsody; Heuberger: Serenade for Strings; Witte: Piano Quartet Op. 5
Fri
13
Host's Choice
Sun
15
Mozart: La finta Giardiniera
Mon
16
Host's Choice; Drake's Village Brass Band and Final Hour of A Musical Odyssey Pre-Empted for Live Jazz from Bushnell Park
Tue
17
Beethoven: Quintet in E for Piano and Winds, Op 16; Grieg: String Quartet in g, Op. 27; Dvořák: Piano Trio #3 in f, Op. 65; Vaughan Williams: Dona Nobis Pacem
Wed
18
Bruckner: Symphony #1; Vaet: Missa Quodlibetica; Buchardo: Canciones; Moniuszko: Overtures; Vanhal: Quartet
Thu
19
Host's Choice
Fri
20
There's some great classical music hiding in the jazz library. Chuck O. will find some of it for you
Sun
22
Handel: Acis and Gallatea
Mon
23
Host's Choice; Drake's Village Brass Band and Final Hour of A Musical Odyssey Pre-Empted for Live Jazz from Bushnell Park
Tue
24
Saint-Saëns: Sonata for Bassoon and Piano in G Major, Op 168; Mendelssohn: Octet in E , Op. 20; Schubert: String Quartet in a, Op. 29 #1, D. 804 "Rosamunde"; Mahler: Symphony #7 in e
Wed
25
Enescu: Symphony No. 1; de Cabezon: Keyboard Pieces; Janacek: Violin Sonata; Handel: Harpsichord Suite in D Minor; Elizabethan Lute Songs
Thu
26
Host's Choice
Fri
27
It's good to be back in the cab with my hand on the throttle. Let's see what's new
Sun
29
Gilbert & Sullivan: The Grand Duke
Mon
30
Host's Choice; Drake's Village Brass Band and Final Hour of A Musical Odyssey Pre-Empted for Live Jazz from Bushnell Park
Tue
31
Georg Philipp Telemann: Ouverture Suite in F Major, TWV 55:F16; Douglas Lilburn: Aotearoa and Forest; J. S. Bach: Cantata for the 9th Sunday after Trinity [Trinity 9] BWV 105 'Herr, gehe nicht ins Gericht mit deinem Knecht' (1723); Robert Simpson: Variations on a Theme by Nielsen (1983); Nicola (Antonio) Porpora (1686-1768): Violin Sonata No. 8 in C major (1754); George Rochberg (1918-2005): Circles of Fire for 2 pianos (1997); Couperin: Pieces de clavecin, Book 1 (1713): 5th Ordre in A major-minor (selections)

August
Wed
1
Mehul:Symphony No. 2; Canis: Songs; Halvorsen: Norwegian Rhapsodies; Reinken: Partita; Marshner: Overtures; Viotti: Harp Sonata
Thu
2
Liszt: Mephisto Waltz No. 1; Bliss: Things to Come Suite; K. A. Hartmann: Concerto Funebre for Violin & String Orchestra; Weingartner: Serenade for String Orchestra; Giuliani: Gran Duo Concertant, Op. 85
Fri
3
Many still don't realize Wynton Marsalis composed a string quartet and ballet music
Sun
5
Kalman: Die Bajadere
Mon
6
Host's Choice; Drake's Village Brass Band and Final Hour of A Musical Odyssey Pre-Empted for Live Jazz from Bushnell Park
Tue
7
Georg Philipp Telemann: Ouverture Suite in G Major, TWV 55:G7; Douglas Lilburn: Symphony No. 1 (1949); J. S. Bach: Cantata for the 10th Sunday after Trinity [Trinity 10] BWV 46 'Schauet doch und sehet, ob irgend ein Schmerz sei' (1723); Nicola (Antonio) Porpora (1686-1768): Violin Sonata No. 9 in E major (1754); George Rochberg (July 5, 1918 - May 29, 2005): Summer 1990 (Piano Trio No. 3); Couperin: Pieces de clavecin, Book 2 (1717): Ordre 6 in B-flat major
Wed
8
Host's Choice
Thu
9
Johann Michael Bach: Auf laßt uns den Herren loben; Zavateri: Concerto No. 10 a Pastorale in D for 2 Violins; Hahn: A Chloris, Piano Quintet; Ketelbey: In a Chinese Temple Garden, In a Monastery Garden, In a Persian Market; Berkeley: Serenade for Strings; Schubert: Piano Sonata in B Flat D 960
Fri
10
Hey conductor, there's a banjo in my orchestra. We salute the Podunk Bluegrass Music Festival as it celebrates its 22nd year
Sun
12
Mayr: Amore non soffre opposizioni
Mon
13
Host's Choice; Drake's Village Brass Band and Final Hour of A Musical Odyssey Pre-Empted for Live Jazz from Bushnell Park
Tue
14
Georg Philipp Telemann: Ouverture Suite in D Major, TWV 55:D13, 'La gaillarde'; Douglas Lilburn: Symphony No. 2 (1951); J. S. Bach: Cantata for the 11th Sunday after Trinity [Trinity 11] BWV 179 'Siehe zu, dass deine Gottesfurcht nicht Heuchelei sei' (1723); Nicola (Antonio) Porpora (1686-1768): Violin Sonata No. 10 in A major (1754); George Rochberg (1918-2005): String Quartet No. 4 (1977); Couperin: Pieces de clavecin, Book 2 (1717): Ordre 7 in G major/minor
Wed
15
Host's Choice
Thu
16
New Releases. A sampling of new acquisitions from the WWUH Library
Fri
17
Remembering Robert Russell Bennett (1894 - 1981)
Sun
19
Lehar: Die Juxheirat
Mon
20
Leonard Bernstein: The Final Concerto (8-19-90) ( Bernstein 100) Britten: Suite on English Folk Songs: A Time There Was... Drake's Village Brass Band...John Philip Sousa - Music for Wind Band Volume 16 Keith Brian, Marine Band of the Royal Netherlands Navy
Tue
21
Georg Philipp Telemann: Ouverture Suite in E Minor, TWV 55:e7; Douglas Lilburn: Symphony No. 3 (1961); J. S. Bach: Cantata for the 12th Sunday after Trinity [Trinity 12] BWV 69a 'Lobe den Herrn, meine Seele' (1723); Nicola (Antonio) Porpora (1686-1768): Violin Sonata No. 11 in D major (1754); Chopin: 24 Preludes, Op. 28; George Rochberg (1918-2005): String Quartet No. 5 (1978); Couperin: Pieces de clavecin, Book 2 (1717): L'art de toucher le clavecin
Wed
22
Rachmaninov: Symphony No. 1; Gombert: Missa Media Vita; Weber: Piano Concerto; Herz: Piano Concerto; Hoffman: Duo Concertant
Thu
23
Graf: Flute Concerto in C; Moszkowski: Caprice espagnole, Characteristic Piece Op. 36 #6 'Etincelles', Guitare Op. 45. #2; Krenek: Kleine Suite, Op. 13a; Lambert: Anna Karenina Suite; Truscott: Elegy for Strings; Rimsky-Korsakov: Capriccio Español
Fri
24
Music from Bang on a Can
Sun
26
Delius: The Magic Fountain
Mon
27
Leonard Bernstein 100th Birthday Celebration (8-25-18) Trouble in Tahiti, Symphony #1, On The Waterfront Drake's Village Brass Band...Bernstein Brass Music with Canadian Brass and Empire Brass
Tue
28
Georg Philipp Telemann: Ouverture Suite in B Minor, TWV 55:h4; Douglas Lilburn: Chaconne for piano (1946); J. S. Bach: Cantata for the 13th Sunday after Trinity [Trinity 13] BWV 77 'Du sollt Gott, deinen Herren, Lieben' (1723); Nicola (Antonio) Porpora (1686-1768): Violin Sonata No. 12 in D minor (1754); George Rochberg (1918-2005): String Quartet No. 6 (1978); Couperin: Pieces de clavecin, Book 2 (1717): Ordre 8 in B minor
Wed
29
Cannabich: Symphonies; Duparc: Songs; Zemlinsky: Trio for Piano, Clarinet and Cello; Rimsky-Korsakov: Le Coq d'Or Suite; Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring
Thu
30
New Releases. A sampling of new acquisitions from the WWUH Library
Fri
31
Classical Conversations
 

  
 
 
  

SUNDAY AFTERNOON 
AT THE OPERA
Your "lyric theater" program
with Keith Brown
Programming selections for the months of July and August, 2018


SUNDAY JULY 1ST Bernstein, Candide

SUNDAY JULY 8TH Offenbach, La Grande Duchesse de Gerolstein.  This French opera bouffe touched off a craze for operetta all over the Western world. Offenbach wrote it to coincide with the splendid Paris Exhibition of 1867. The cream of Europe's aristocracy and intelligentsia turned up at Offenbach's own Varietes theater to see the most chic musical entertainment in town. Even the emperor Napoleon III had a box reserved for him at the Varietes. La Grande Duchesse de Gerolstein was revived again and again throughout Europe. The Viennese in particular were crazy about it. Today it's Die Fledermaus that gets all the glory. That classic of Viennese operetta, however, is derived from a French play by Meilhac and Halevy, the team who wrote the libretti for all the best of Offenbach's lyric stageworks. The recordings of this one, which I presented on Sundays in July of 1985 and 2009, both featured some wonderful singers, but they were abridgements or downright corruptions of Offenbach's original score. All of Offenbach's scores require careful reconstruction. On this July Sunday you get to hear Gerolstein pretty much as Offenbach intended it to be performed in 1867 with the restored scene of the conspiracy, the knife-grinder's song and the Grand Duchess's meditation. The orchestral scoring takes advantage of the larger group of musicians employed in those productions staged in Vienna. La Grande Duchesse de Gerolstein was revived yet again for staging at the Festival delle Valle d'Itria Martina Franca in July of 1996. Emmanuel Villaume conducts the Orchestra Internazionale d'Italia and the Bratislava Chamber Choir. This production stars soprano Lucia Valentini- Terrani as the Duchess. Gerolstein is a sendup of the military, with all the associated bombast and nutty disciplined posturing. The role of General Boum is thought to be a charicature of Otto, Prinz von Bismarck, the Prussian "Iron Chancellor," wearing that characteristic Prussian spiked helmet.

SUNDAY JULY 15TH Mozart, La Finta Giardiniera.    In the eighteenth century the way to wealth and fame as a composer lay through the writing of operas. Mozart the adolescent prodigy was fascinated with opera. He yearned to write anything he could in the genre to advance himself. Previous operas he wrote while sojourning in Italy with his father did not make a lasting mark with the public or with aristocratic patrons. Mozart jumped at a commission to compose an opera buffa for the midwinter carnival in Munich. This was La finta Giardiniera or "The Girl in Gardiner's Disguise," K.196 (1775). The carnivalgoers loved it, but when the festivities were over young Wolfgang did not get the court appointment he was hoping for. The music for La finta Giardiniera is as fine as a nineteen year old genius could create. Despite the silly amorous flirtations of the comedy, the musical settings at certain moments touch a depth of feeling that looks forward to the great operas of Mozart's maturity. "The Girl in Gardiner's Disguise" was first performed in Italian language and later in German translation with spoken dialog, making a Singspiel out of the original opera buffa. I have broadcast two different recordings of the German Singspiel version with the title Die Gartnerin aus Liebe on Sundays in 1988 and 1990. Then on Sunday, May 12, 2002 came the complete score of the Italian opera buffa as recorded in 1991, live in performance in Vienna at the Konzerthaus. The late great pioneer in period instrumental practice, Nikolaus Harnoncourt was conducting the ensemble he founded, the Concentus Musicus. The Czech soprano Edita Gruberova sang the leading role of Sandrina, the "disguised" girl, who turns out to be a noblewomen. This Sunday you get to hear once again that Teldec release of La finta Giardiniera on three compact discs in the Das Alte Werk series.

SUNDAY JULY 22ND Handel, Acis and Galatea.  Every summer I try to include in the programming mix something pastoral in nature. Over the decades several recordings have been made of George Frideric Handel's delightful masque in two acts Acis and Galatea (1718), which like Henry Purcell's Dido and Aeneas (1689) vies for consideration as the first true opera in English language. The libretto was written by John Gay, who a few years later would write The Beggar's Opera, the enormously popular lyric comedy. Handel's original Cannons scoring for this pastoral entertainment called for pairs of violins, cellos and oboes or recorders with harpsichord. The five singers Handel required sing in solo capacity as characters in the mythic drama. They join voices to form a mini- chorus. Such were the musical resources available to the composer on the country estate of his patron the Duke of Chandos. This intimate, small-scale version of the work was the one released in 1988 by Newport Classics on two compact discs. Johannes Somary conducts the tiny period instrument Amor Artis Orchestra. I last broadcast this recording on Sunday, July 20, 2008 and before that on Sunday, June 4, 1995. The English masque was rendered into a German language secular oratorio, Handel's music adapted for a larger orchestra and rescored in high classical style by none other than Mozart in 1788. The 1991 DGG Archiv recording of the Handel/Mozart Acis und Galatea, with Trevor Pinnock conducting the English Concert, I broadcast first on Sunday, May 21, 2006 and again on Sunday, July 14, 2013.

SUNDAY JULY 29TH Gilbert & Sullivan, The Grand Duke. I usually program one or another of the comic operas of William S. Gilbert and Sir Arthur Sullivan on a Sunday in late July. The Grand Duke,or The Statutory Duel (1896) was Gilbert and Sullivan's last collaboration. They referred to this operetta as "the one that failed." It didn't fail totally. It just did poorly, although it was mounted in a lavish production. The plot is absurdly complicated (what probably did the production in), but Sullivan's music is as good as most of what he wrote for the other more well known operettas that are counted in the G & S canon. In radio broadcast it's not the staging but the music that matters. The Grand Duke was never professionally performed again after its first run until 1975, when the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company recorded it for Decca under the supervision of the legendary troupe's founder Richard D'Oyly Carte's daughter Dame Bridget D'Oyly Carte. London Records released The Grand Duke on two stereo LP's which I broadcast way back on Sunday, August 12, 1984. Nobody has a lock on the G & S canon, since amateur theater companies of considerable talent all over the world perform these works, like our own Simsbury Light Opera Company. (The renowned Savoyard Martyn Green coached them at the very end of his career.) On a more professional level, the Ohio Light Opera Company staged The Grand Duke at its Summer festival in 2003. Founded in 1979, the OLO is the resident lyric theater institution at the College of Wooster (Ohio), a school with a strong emphasis on the performing arts. Albany Records released the live-in-performance recording of the OLO production on two compact discs. The recording is musically complete and includes Gilbert's witty dialog. ( That classic 1975 Decca/London Savoyard recording has no dialog at all.) I have previously broadcast OLO recordings of The Sorcerer, Princess Ida and Utopia,Limited.

SUNDAY AUGUST 5TH Kalman, Die Bajadere. There was another Hungarian composer of operetta besides Franz Lehar who was in circulation in Vienna during the Silver Age of Viennese operetta in the early twentieth century. That man was Imre or Emmerich Kalman (1882-1953). Kalman's Die Czardasfuerstin premiered in Vienna in 1915 and immediately became a staple of the operetta repertoire. Kalman had other stage successes, too, notably Grafin Maritza (1924). I have broadcast recordings of both of those Kalman favorites on bygone August Sundays. Also, I presented an obscure Kalman operetta Die Herzogin von Chicago (1928) on Sunday, December 23, 2008. Kalman himself considered Die Bajadere (1921) to be the one of his works that came closest to actual opera. Die Bajadere or 'The Temple Dancer" employs some oriental tonal exoticisms, as well as popular American dance rhythms of the Roaring Twenties. The story involves an Indian prince, Parisian nightlife, wife swapping and an operetta within an operetta. Die Bajadere was produced for radio broadcast by West German Radio Cologne in February, 2014. Richard Bonynge conducted the West German Radio Broadcast House Orchestra and Cologne Radio Chorus, with eight vocal soloists, the speaking role of the wife of the theater director taken by Kalman's daughter Yvonne, who although quite elderly, was still very much alive in 2014. cpo Records released Die Bajadere on two CD's in 2016. Frau Kalman thought the WDR Cologne production was wonderful and did her father's music full justice. "With this release," she writes, "Die Bajadere will grant us many years of pleasure."

SUNDAY AUGUST 12TH Mayr, Amore non soffre opposizione. It was a German composer, Johann Simon Mayr who brought Italian opera from the eighteenth into the nineteenth century. Born in Bavaria in 1763, Mayr was a little younger than the Austrian Mozart and a little older then the Rhineland native Beethoven. He long outlived both of them, dying in 1845. Mayr's career was spent largely in Italy. He Italianized his name. His operas continued to be performed in Italy and elsewhere in Europe up to circa 1850. For a while his works rivaled in popularity those of Rossini. It is therefore hard to believe how Mayr's operas in later times could be so completely forgotten. Now in the twenty first century a conductor from Bavaria, Franz Hauk has championed the cause of Mayr's music. He has already recorded three of Mayr's oratorios, released through the Naxos label. In 2017 Naxos came out with Hauk's recorded interpretation of Telemaco (1797), an opera seria in the style of Gluck. That recording I broadcast on Sunday, November 12 of last year. Mayr also composed works in the genre of the Italian opera buffa. In 2016 Naxos gave out the world premiere recording of the comic opera Amore non soffre opposizioni ("Love Will Not Tolerate Opposition," 1810) on two compact discs. This is a tender-hearted lyric comedy in the form of the "sentimental drama" in vogue at the beginning of the nineteenth century. Mayr's music is progressive in that there's no recitative passages. Franz Hauk was conducting from the harpsichord when Amore was recorded at Neuburg on the Danube in Bavaria in 2011. He directed the East-West European Festival Orchestra and six vocal soloists.

SUNDAY AUGUST 19TH Lehar, Die Juxheirat. There was a Golden Age of Viennese operetta in the latter part of the nineteenth century, the age of the "Waltz King" Johann Strauss, Jr. and Die Fledermaus. It was followed by a Silver Age in the early twentieth century. The Hungarian Franz Lehar (1870-1948) was the preeminent composer of that later period. Of course, he wasn't quite so eminent early on in his career, before the phenomenal international success of his "Merry Widow" in 1905. Lehar's operetta Die Juxheirat ("The Mock Marriage" or 'Marriage As A Joke") came just before 'The Widow" in 1904. According to Bill White, a reviewer for Fanfare magazine, the libretto of Die Juxheirat was quite progressive and rather kinky. "Written by Julius Bauer, one of Vienna's most influential theater critics, the story seems to be well ahead of its times, combining elements of feminism, homoeroticism, cross-dressing and same-sex marriage, subjects overtly titillating and perhaps thought even a bit naughty by the staid turn of the century Viennese. The story is set in America, the first two acts in the Hamptons..." Bill White was reviewing for Fanfare the very recent cpo compact disc release of Die Juxheirat. This Lehar rarity was staged at the 2016 Lehar Festival at Bad Ischl in Austria. It was recorded live in performance there, with Marius Burkert conducting the Franz Lehar Orchestra and Chorus. Mr. White praises the cpo release on two compact discs. In concluding his review (Fanfare, May/June,2018 issue) he notes that "As far as is known, the only previous recording of any of this music was some eight sides [on 78 rpm shellac discs?] by the original cast in 1905. This operetta...may not soon again see another recording. Even if it were not performed nearly so well as here, it would be highly recommended..."

SUNDAY AUGUST 26TH Delius, The Magic Fountain  The last Sunday in August I customarily reserve for broadcast of one of the seven operas of Frederick Delius (1862-1934), who has been called "The English Debussy." I program them now because Delius' exquisite impressionistic style is so evocative of the lazy, hazy end of Summertime. Delius' second attempt at writing opera, The Magic Fountain (1895) never saw the stage in his lifetime. The English conductor Sir Thomas Beecham befriended Delius and championed his music. Beecham planned to have The Magic Fountain staged in 1953, but its actual premiere came over BBC Radio in 1977 without need of visible staging. Delius so captures the spirit of nature you can see in your mind's eye the setting: the Everglades in the time of the Spanish conquistadores. In seeking the Fountain of Eternal Youth and Life in South Florida a Spanish nobleman falls in love with a Native American princess. He dies for her sake by drinking the fatal waters. Delius knew the scenery of the land of this story quite intimately. In his youth he spent time managing a small citrus plantation near Jacksonville. His deepest artistic inspirations go back to that place. The world premiere recording of Delius' The Magic Fountain heightens with environmental sound effects the balmy atmosphere the music has already created. Norman Del Mar leads the BBC Concert Orchestra with vocal soloists. I have broadcast the 1985 BBC Artium CD release four times before in my long ongoing cycles of Delius opera presentations, on Delius Sundays in August of 1987, '91, '99 and 2007. Keep listening for a recording of Delius choral masterpiece Seadrift (1904), a setting of the poetry of Walt Whitman.
All the featured recordings I am presenting during this two month period of Summer programming come from my own collection of opera/operetta on silver disc.

Never Miss Your Favorite WWUH Programs Again!
WWUH Round Logo Introducing... the WWUH Archive!

We are very excited to announce
that all WWUH programs are now available on-demand 
using 
the "Program Archive" link 
on our home page,   
 
  This means that if you missed one of your favorite shows, or if you want to listen to parts of it again, you can do so easily using the Archive link.  Programs are available for listening for 
two weeks after their air date.
  
 
Enjoy the music, even when you can't listen "live"!
West Hartford Symphony Orchestra
 
In Collaboration with the WWUH Classical Programming we are pleased to partner with the West Hartford Symphony Orchestra to present their announcements and schedule to enhance our commitment to being part of the Greater Hartford Community
 
West Hartford Symphony Orchestra
Richard Chiarappa, Music Director
whso.org
(860) 521-4362
 
For information, 860-521-4362 or
  http://whso.org/ .
 The Connecticut Valley Symphony Orchestra


Great music and great musicians!  Food for the soul!  Affordable prices!  The Connecticut Valley Symphony Orchestra offers these benefits to all of you in the greater Hartford Community. 
 
Become a subscriber to the CVSO and you'll get it all-and four great concerts for the price of three!  Our orchestra is supported by musicians' dues, grants, contributions, and subscriptions.  In light of  the economic challenges we face, your support is crucial.

The CVSO has been operating for 87 years.  Our musicians, serious amateurs and music educators, range from teenagers to seniors, and have a fabulous 2017-2018 season of classical, romantic and modern music lined up for your listening pleasure. 

All programs are subject to change
Concerts are Sunday afternoons at 3:00 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church, 120 Sigourney Street, Hartford.

For further information: 
The Musical Club of Hartford
 
  
The Musical Club of Hartford, Inc., which celebrated its 125 year history in 2015-2016, is an organization whose primary goal is to nurture the Musical Arts and promote excellence in music, both among seasoned music lovers as well as the younger generations. The Musical Club makes music more readily available to people of all ages and social backgrounds in our community.

For further information: http://musicalclubhartford.org/
 The Hartford Chorale
  
Audition to join the Hartford Chorale! We will be holding auditions for our 2018-2019 season on July 9.

For further information: Hartford Chorale 860-547-1982 or www.hartfordchorale.org .

Manchester Symphony Orchestra
Manchester Symphony Orchestra and Chorale
Bringing Music to our Community for 58 Years!
 
The Manchester Symphony Orchestra and Chorale is a nonprofit volunteer organization that brings quality orchestral and choral music to the community, provides performance opportunities for its members, and provides education and performance opportunities for young musicians in partnership with Manchester schools and other Connecticut schools and colleges.
 
Joseph Hodge, Orchestra Artistic Director
Dr. Carolina Flores, Chorale Artistic Director
Beth El Temple in West Hartford
Music at Beth El Temple in West Hartford is under the aegis of The Beth El Music & Arts Committee (BEMA). With the leadership of Cantor Joseph Ness, it educates and entertains the community through music.
 
   
Open to the Public. Plenty of FREE Parking.
Beth El Temple
2626 Albany Ave, West Hartford, CT 06117
Phone: (860) 233-9696
E-mail: bema@betheltemplemusic.com


How To Listen To WWUH
Come as You Are... Tune in However Works Best for You
  
In Central CT and Western MA, WWUH can be heard at 91.3 on the FM dial.  Our programs are also carried at various times through out the day on this station:

WDJW, 89.7, Somers, CT

You can also listen on line using your PC, tablet or smart device.  Our MP3 stream is  here.

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