Make the smart irrigation choice 


Did you know you can find out what the weather is doing in your neighborhood? And that you can use this information to save water and money?

The Cochise Water Project (TCWP), in partnership with Cochise College, has installed 12 weather stations in and around the Sierra Vista Sub Watershed, and the data they collect will be fed into smart irrigation controllers soon to be available to the public and local businesses.

Once installed, the controllers will be linked to the nearest weather station, which in turn will determine when to turn on your irrigation system. In other words, your landscaping will only be watered when it is needed.

Thanks to funding from TCWP, area residents and businesses can get a smart irrigation controller for a fraction of their usual $300 cost.

"We hope to be able to offer the controllers for around $25 each," said Administrative Director Tim Cervantes.

Demand for these controllers, which TCWP will also install, is expected to be high, but you can get on a waiting list now. If you're interested just email smartcontrol@thecochisewaterproject.com with your name, address, email, and telephone number.

In the meantime, you can visit the TCWP's website to view data from the weather stations.

Let's celebrate - save the date!
One of The Cochise Water Project's largest undertakings has been the installation of a series of water saving measures at Pueblo Del Sol Golf Course.

A 30,000 gallon rainwater harvesting tank and smart irrigation controllers throughout the course, means PDS is now the most forward thinking golf facility in the nation when it comes to water use and conservation.

The Cochise Water Project, which funded the equipment and installation, thinks that is worth celebrating, and so we'll be marking the completion of the project with a ribbon cutting on May 23, at 1pm.

This event will be open to the public and will include information and community booths, prizes, food, and more. We'll bring you further details nearer the time.

Tips to teach your kids to save
When it comes to water conservation, we should start at home... with our children. Help your kids learn these five simple tips for conserving water. 

1. Turn off the faucets
When brushing teeth or scrubbing their soapy hands and face, teach your children to turn off the faucet so they do not let water simply run down the drain.

2. Tightly turn off the faucets
Another important lesson for your kids, as well as for yourself, is to check the faucets in your home to make sure they are tightly turned off to avoid a small, slow drip that can waste a lot of water over time.

3. Don't flush
Okay, if it's number 2, they should definitely flush. But each time an average toilet is flushed, it uses about 5 gallons of water. If your kids just have to go number 1, suggest they don't flush, especially if you have lots of little ones that "go" often.

4. Bath time for babies
For safety reasons, babies should only have about an inch or two of water in their bath anyway. There is no reason to use much more than that. When your kids are old enough, switch from baths to quick showers that use less water than filling up a tub.

5. Watering the grass
Encourage your kids to collect "old" water from leftover water bottles, half-drank cups or boiling eggs, (after the water has cooled) and use it to hydrate your grass and bushes instead of turning on the sprinklers or the hose in the middle of the day. Make sure your kids understand why it's so important to reuse water when possible, instead of simply pouring unwanted water down the drain.

For more information visit http://wateruseitwisely.com/5-easy-ways-save-water/

Get a rainwater barrel while stocks last!
Stop by our offices to get your hands on one of these rainwater barrel kits.  These 50 gallon barrels are very easy to install and a great way to get started on your rainwater harvesting journey.

They only cost $50 each and we have just a few available. The Cochise Water Project is located at 1819 Paseo San Luis, and we're open Monday 11 am to 4 pm, Wednesday 11 am to 4 pm, and
Friday 11 am to 4 pm.

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