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CBE President Celebrates Fuller Theological Seminary's CBE Membership with a Lecture

On January 26, 2012, CBE president Mimi Haddad will deliver her lecture, "Why Women's Leadership is a Primary Issue: Wisdom from the Early Evangelicals" at Fuller Theological Seminary on their Pasadena, CA campus. The session will be held in Payton 101, January 26, 2012, and will begin at 5:00pm.


Registration for the Houston Conference is Open! 

Early bird registration is now open for CBE's conference, "A New Creation. A New Tradition. Reclaiming the Biblical Tradition of Man and Woman, One in Christ" April 27-28, 2012, in Houston, TX. Register by January 31, 2012 and get the early bird rate!


Fuller Video Outlines Biblical Support for Women in Ministry and Leadership 

Fuller Theological Seminary recently became an organizational member of CBE. Fuller created a video to show at CBE's 2011 Seattle Conference which outlines Fuller's commitment to supporting women in ministry and leadership as equal partners with men in church and society. Click here to see the video.  



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Help CBE Translate Our Statement on Men, Women, and Biblical Equality!

If you are fluent in Urdu, or know someone who is, we need you! CBE is looking for someone fluent in Urdu to translate our one page Statement on Men, Women, and Biblical Equality. If you would like to support translation work, donate to our literature distribution fund here.
 

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New at CBE Bookstore!

Praised in Christianity Today as one of the five best books on the topic of women in ministry, Beyond the Curse: Women Called to Ministry is finally available in Spanish.
Get your copy today!
 

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2012 Kenyan Conference

Christians for Biblical Equality presents "Equal to Serve: Gender and Authentic Biblical Leadership" on July 20-22, 2012 in Limuru, Kenya. Christian leaders, scholars, and activists from all over the world will conduct sessions about gender, leadership, justice, and what it means to be the body of Christ. Come learn and fellowship with us!
Click here to learn more.
 

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Become an Organizational Member! 

Join a global community of like-minded Christians, committed to the Bible's message of gender equality and justice in the home, church, and world. Your membership includes cutting-edge, award-winning resources. It also supports and sustains our ministry!
Click here to learn more.

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"The Resignation of Eve": A Review  

Jenny Rae Armstrong is an award-winning freelance journalist who writes about women's issues for Christian publications. She lives in northern Wisconsin with her husband Aaron and their four boys, and is finishing up a ministry degree at Northwestern College after taking a long mommy-hiatus. She is passionate about encouraging women to grow into the fullness of everything God created them to be, preferably over a good cup of coffee.

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I was miffed. I had requested Jim Henderson's upcoming book, The Resignation of Eve, expecting a fiery egalitarian polemic about how limiting women's roles is driving women away from the church--a premise supported by recent research from Barna indicating that women, as a group, are abandoning the church faster than men. Instead, I found myself immersed in a series of interviews that sounded an awful lot like the conversations I have over chocolate chip muffins and watery Folgers at my weekly women's Bible studies. And frankly, after 15 years of involvement in women's ministries, the last thing I wanted to read about was one more woman expressing insecurity about her gifts and ambivalence about her position in her church.

It was what I needed to read, though. By the time I reached the third interview, my annoyance had vanished, and I was nodding in recognition as the common threads wove a telling tapestry. While most books discussing women's positions in church focus on doctrinal or social issues, Henderson boldly goes where no man has gone before--into the thickly-veiled thought life of the "average" Christian woman. In doing so, he hits the heart of the matter:

Millions of women have given up protesting, given up trying to move forward, and allowed themselves to be convinced that they aren't and shouldn't want to be men's equals in the church that dares to name itself after one of history's most radical advocates for women--Jesus of Nazareth. Some women have resigned from Christianity, some have resigned from God, but many have simply developed a more insidious form of resignation, the invisible resignation that people develop when they have given up hope. This kind of resignation leads a woman to appear to be present when she actually left the building years ago.

Ouch. The jig is up, ladies--Jim Henderson has been spying on us.

While the theological discussion about gender equality is extremely important, it may not be bringing change and empowerment to the women in the pews, women who are being fed a starvation diet of "Bible" studies that have more to do with homemaking and beauty than hermeneutics, and devouring books by Beth Moore because they're the meatiest teaching their leaders seem to think them capable of digesting. Add to the menu the fact that many egalitarians keep silent for fear of creating division, and we find that many churches are packed with intelligent, well-educated, extremely competent women who have no idea how to use their gifts in church without creating conflict. So they don't. They may plant their gifts in the secular world, where they are appreciated, but gifts meant for the church are left rotting on the vine all around us. Can't you just smell it?

The Resignation of Eve reminds us that the real issue--and solution--is in the hearts and minds of women. Women need to be encouraged. They need to be mentored. They need to be reminded that they, too, were created in the image of God, and that stifling their gifts is like hiding a mirror designed to reflect God's care for a hurting world. Once they believe that, believe it deep in their bones, they're not going to let anything stop them.

Let's go encourage some women!