eNewsletter | Jan 30, 2017.

About eScience Info's Newsletter

This is a free weekly eNewsletter for Life Science Scientists. eScienceInfo has established itself as the leading provider of up-to-the-minute information for Scientists. Now, we're enhancing our services to better meet the needs of our readers. For years we've searched out the latest grants available and consolidated the information into one easy-to-read e-newsletter. Then we delivered it right to your inbox very Monday to save you the hundreds of hours that it would take to search out that information yourself.


Harrington Discovery Institute is now soliciting proposals for the 2018 Harrington Scholar-Innovator Award.

The Harrington Scholar-Innovator Award offers inventive physician-scientists the resources to advance their discoveries into medicines. Letters of Intent are now being accepted.$100,000 guaranteed; opportunity to qualify for up to $700,000 over two years

Letters of Intent are being accepted through midnight April 5, 2017. Read on...


Announcing a brand new prize for research in neuromodulation.

Announcing a brand new prize for research in neuromodulation. The Science & PINS Prize for Neuromodulation is a highly competitive prize which honors scientists for their excellent contributions to neuromodulation research. Neuromodulation is any form of alteration of nerve activity through the delivery of physical (electrical, magnetic, optical) stimulation or chemical agents to targeted sites of the body. The winner of the is awarded US$25,000 and publication of his or her essay in the journal Science.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: MARCH 15, 2017T

Read More






Scientists used light to turn mice into stone-cold killers

A team of scientists used brain control to turn about a dozen ordinary mice into killing machines. They employed a technique called optogenetics that manipulates neurons using light to make the fluffy critters go all Hulk on prey.

Read More


Printed human body parts could soon be available for transplant

EVERY year about 120,000 organs, mostly kidneys, are transplanted from one human being to another. Sometimes the donor is a living volunteer. Usually, though, he or she is the victim of an accident, stroke, heart attack or similar sudden event that has terminated the life of an otherwise healthy individual. But a lack of suitable donors, particularly as cars get safer and first-aid becomes more effective, means the supply of such organs is limited. Many people therefore die waiting for a transplant. That has led researchers to study the question of how to build organs from scratch.

Read More


www.escienceinfo.com | escienceinfo@comcast.net

Copyright © 2017 | 2017 ScienceInfoMedia All rights reserved.