WEEK 4: PUBLIC HEALTH

TODAY'S CHALLENGE:
MATERNAL AND INFANT MORTALITY

The United States is one of the most dangerous developed countries in which to give birth. According to data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Vital Statistics System, the 2018 maternal mortality rate places the U.S. 10th out of 10 when comparing similarly wealthy countries. This is, in part, due to the dramatic racial disparities in maternal and infant mortality.

Toxic stress and bias in medical care mean that women of color are three to four times more likely to die from pregnancy-related complications. Racism is a public health crisis and it is time to treat it as such.


WE CHALLENGE YOU TO TAKE...

In the U.S., black babies die at twice the rate of white babies. Right now, black women in Virginia are three times more likely to die from pregnancy complications than their white counterparts.
Watch this interview featuring Stacey D. Stewart, the President and CEO of March of Dimes, where she and her co-panelists grapple with the growing maternal health crisis, and how to provide every mother the best care.
Read this article about the negative impact of institutional racism on maternal and infant mortality for Native American women, which closely parallels that of African American women.
PUBLIC HEALTH
WEEKLY ACTION ALERT

LEVEL 1 :   Talk to your company/organization's Human Resources department about their parental leave policy and other systems in place to support new parents.

LEVEL 2 :  Write a letter to your local elected officials urging them to declare racism a public health crisis.

LEVEL 3 : Join Your Neighbor's Hood Podcast and Volunteer Hampton Roads in an effort to build relationships and continue the conversation around race by hosting Just Dinner .

JOIN THE  21 DAY CHALLENGE FACEBOOK GROUP   FOR CONVERSATIONS WITH FELLOW PARTICIPANTS.