A newsletter by the ASD Network
 

Behavior Momentum

by Pam Sharping




WHAT IS IT?
 
Also known as, High-Probability Command Sequence (HPCS) is an effective
antecedent strategy that increases compliant behaviors!
 
WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?
  • For behavior compliance, the child is likely to follow directions because they are getting reinforced for easy behaviors.
  • Reduces frustration levels, because students are having success on easy tasks, increasing the likelihood that they will try harder behaviors. 
WHEN CAN IT BE USED?
  • Prior to any difficult or low-probability behavior or task.
  • To regain attention.
  • To increase motivation.
HOW TO IMPLEMENT?
  • Identify low-p behaviors. Researchers typically identify low-p behaviors as complying with directives 50% or
  • less. Researchers conducted 10 trials per behavior (low-p and high-p) to determine this percentage.
  • Identify high-p behaviors. Researchers typically identify high-p behaviors as complying with directives 80% or better. Develop a list and vary the high-p requests given. Avoid repeating identical high-p chains.
  • Deliver 3-5 high-p requests rapidly just prior to administering a low-p request.
  • Deliver verbal or gestural praise (thumbs up, waving hands in the air) for each response to a high-p request.
  • Deliver the low-p request within 5 seconds of reinforcing a response to the last high-p request. Delaying the low-p request (e.g., 20 second delay) can decrease the likelihood of compliance.
  • The topography of high-p requests may need to be altered to be consistent with the student's age and functioning level.
  • Generalize behavior with other instructors.
  • Program to fade out high-p requests slowly. One study faded from 3 high-p's to 1 high-p prior to delivering 1 low-p.
  • Record data on the target low-p behavior to monitor progress

Behavior Momentum
Behavior Momentum


References:
 
Belfiore, P. J., Basile, S. P., & Lee, D. L. (2008). Using a high probability command sequence to increase classroom compliance: The role of
behavioral momentum. Journal of Behavioral Education,  17, 160-171.
Davis, C.A., Brady, M.P., Williams, R.E., & Hamiliton, R. (1992). Effects of high-probability requests on the acquisition and generalization of
responses in young children with behavior disorders. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 25, 905-916 .
Mace, F. C., Hock, M. L., Lalli, J.S., West, B. J., Belfiore, P., Pinter, E., & Brown, D. K. (1988). Behavioral momentum in the treatment of
noncompliance. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis,  21, 123-141.
Nevin, J. A., Mandell, C., & Atak, J. R. (1983). The analysis of behavioral momentum. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior,  39, 49-59.


Coming up in November:

7th 2 Day Structured Teach for Students with Classic Autism
10th Structured Teach for High Functioning Autism and AS
30th  Tri-State Webinar:  Sex Abuse Prevention through Sex Eductation Training: How Reducing the Amount of Touch, Talk and Trust with our Clients/Students can Actually Increase their Safety in Relationships
Part 1
1st Tri-State Webinar:  Sex Abuse Prevention through Sex Eductation Training: How Reducing the Amount of Touch, Talk and Trust with our Clients/Students can Actually Increase their Safety in Relationships
Part 2

STAY CONNECTED !
Like us on Facebook   Follow us on Twitter   Find us on Pinterest   Visit our blog
ASD Network| 402-472-4194| awragge2@unl.edu| www.unl.edu/asdnetwork/