A Message from Our Executive Director

Eric Vines
My wife and I were talking recently about Darigold's marketing campaign about "white" cheddar cheese. She and I are fans of the orange-hued Tillamook medium cheddar, but the Darigold campaign made us wonder why certain varieties of cheese are typically sold with an orange tone. Pulling out the brick of cheese in our fridge and reading the ingredients, I expected to see something like "yellow dye #3," but I was wrong. It turns out the orange color comes from annatto.
 
What is annatto and why would it be used in cheese? A quick look online gave us our answer. Annatto is a seed from a tree native to South America. In the mid 1500s, premium cheeses in Britain were naturally tinted by carotene-rich summer grasses that milk-producing cows consumed, passing through to their milk. The European discovery of annatto in South America in the 16th century introduced a natural food coloring that allowed cheesemakers to make their cheese look fancier and thereby worthy of a higher price. The practice has continued ever since. The color in cheese comes from trees!
 
I find reoccurring delight when connections between forests and our human experiences reveal themselves. As a species we have co-evolved with forests and today the importance of forests has never been greater to our comfort and our survival. This is one reason the World Forestry Center is exploring new partnerships to help people build understanding about the value of forests in nearly every aspect of our society.
 
Over the next few weeks our new international fellows will arrive; this eight-person cohort will spend the next six months investigating some of the key intersections between forests and humanity (issues much weightier than cheese color). On May 26 from 5-8pm, we will host a reception that introduces all eight fellows to our Portland community. I hope you will join us. Perhaps we can spark a dialogue about the role of forests in our quickly changing world. You might make a new friend from India, Nigeria, Taiwan, or Malaysia.  You could learn something that surprises you. You'll definitely get annatto-colored cheese.  



Eric Vines
Executive Director  
Leadership Hall Spotlight
Janet McLennan



Maybe it all began when, as a young teen, she hiked the forests around Mt. Rainier with her friends.  Certainly it set the stage for Janet McLennan's long and remarkable career path in a life dedicated to protecting and preserving our environmental resources.  Indeed, Janet has provided leadership in virtually every notable Pacific Northwest natural resource policy arena in the last half of the 20th century and beyond.
 
Born in 1926, Janet Watts grew up as an only child in a downtown Tacoma apartment.  She graduated from the University of Oregon with honors in English in 1948 and went on to attend the prestigious Radcliffe Course in Publishing Procedures, an intensive summer program begun in 1947 that has since become the preeminent training opportunity in the publishing world.  This may have helped her land a job in New York City as an assistant college editor at Mademoiselle Magazine. The following year, she married Bill McLennan in Tacoma and moved with him to Washington D.C..  There she worked for the Library of Congress and attended the McCarthy hearings.  Of course this stimulated her interest in politics and law.  But having three children took priority for a few years.
In the '60s, although she twice ran unsuccessfully for the Oregon Legislature, she was successful in leading a campaign to abolish the death penalty in Oregon.  She also served as executive director of the Committee to Save the Beaches, a campaign that prevented highway construction on Nestucca Spit and helped galvanize public interest in securing public access to all of Oregon's coastal beaches.  This controversy produced the greatest public response to any issue in Oregon's legislative history in its time and eventually led to passage of the state's well-regarded Beach Bill.
 
In 1972 Janet earned her long desired law degree from the Northwestern School of Law at Lewis & Clark College and promptly passed Oregon's bar exam.  She went to work for Bob Straub as staff director and counsel of the Joint Interim Committee on Natural Resources where she helped draft the first language describing the importance of maintaining forestlands as forestlands. And following Straub's landslide gubernatorial election in 1974, she became his Natural Resources assistant, actively involved in every natural resource policy decision during his administration.  Afterward she served as a board member and president of 1000 Friends of Oregon, the watchdog organization that helped define and implement Oregon's new land use planning system.  She then did a stint with the Bonneville Power Administration in the late 1980s, directing their fish and wildlife division and overseeing complex environmental analyses.  
 
In 1987 she was named to the newly reconstituted Board of Forestry and served as Board Chairwoman under three different Oregon governors from 1990 to 1995. There, she provided critical leadership, legal insight, and analysis on key issues like endangered species protection, development of new stream rules, and policy direction for the sustainable management of state forests.  Starting in the late 1990s, she joined and then chaired for a decade the nonprofit Tillamook Forest Heritage Trust that fostered the construction and operation of the Tillamook Forest Center.  Opened in 2008, it offers visitors the opportunity to better understand our precious forests.
 
Today, as Janet reflects on the past as well as the future, she recognizes the value of forests both as a guiding thread woven through the course of her own life and as a special promise for Oregonians that must be protected, respected, and utilized.



World Forest Institute News
Four Fellows Arrive for the 2016 WFI Fellowship 
Karishmaa Pai
Chia-Chun Hsu 
Samantha Kwan
Abiodun Solanke
The World Forest Institute welcomes four of this year's eight Fellows into the International Fellowship Program this month. We are excited to start engaging with these professionals and connecting them with resources throughout the Pacific Northwest. You can read a little about them below and on our website.

Karishmaa Pai from India. Karishmaa is an independent consultant interested in the development of urban forests. In particular, she wants to understand how using corporate and social responsibility programs may help fund the development of urban forests.

Chia-Chun "Rebecca" Hsu from Taiwan. Rebecca works for the Taiwan Forestry Research Institute and is a research canopy scientist. She is interested in connecting with canopy scientists in the PNW and understanding the body of research around climate change and canopy science.

Samantha Kwan from Malaysia. Samantha is a park warden for the Sarawak Forestry Corporation. She is currently managing a newly developed urban reserve and is interested in how urban parks operate, their funding structures, and development and implementation of management plans.

Abiodun Solanke from Nigeria. Abiodun is a licensed architect who is interested in using bamboo as a low-cost building material for housing communities in Nigeria. He would like to integrate with the sustainable green building sector and find ways to develop cost efficiencies for building in impoverished communities.
 
Meet them in person! 

We hope that you will come meet them in person at our International Night open house event on May 26 from 5-8 pm.  The social will be held in the Discovery Museum. Drinks and light appetizers will be served while you are getting to know our visiting scholars. 

Please download the flier for this event and RSVP to Chandalin Bennett at cbennett@worldforestry.org or 503-488-2137. 

Register for the event here.
Asia-Pacific Wood Trade Conference Success 
Old friends came together at the conference reception. From left: WFI Director Sara Wu, Chilean alumni Mario Angel (2001), Finnish alumnus Jaakko Rantanen (1998), and former World Forestry Center staff Susan Parsons.


I n early March, the World Forestry Center hosted its first ever Changing Dynamics of the Asia-Pacific Wood Trade conference , organized jointly by Dana Ltd.  and the World Forestry Center. The two-day event attracted 58 attendees and 19 speakers from 13 countries, including a presentation from WFI alumnus Jaakko Rantanen (Finland, 1998) on the softwood trade from Europe to Asia.     

This conference marked the beginning of an important conversation on wood trade and set a benchmark for future discussions.  Topics in the economic, environmental and social arenas were addressed, as well as discussion around government regulations in various domestic markets of wood trade.  Attendees and speakers alike agreed that the conference was an important and relevant conference for everyone in global wood trade.

View the synthesis of the 1st conference on Changing Dynamics of the Asia-Pacific Wood Trade Here

WFI Presents at Forestry Agency Leadership Program
State Forestry Leaders Make Global Connection
Chandalin Bennett 
WFI Senior Programs Manager
On April 5, World Forest Institute alum Stuty Maskey from Nepal, WFI Senior Programs Manager Chandalin Bennett, and Senior Fellow Rick Zenn led a training session for the Oregon Department of Forestry Agency Leadership Program (ALP) in Salem. Following sessions conducted by State Forester Doug Decker and Executive Director of the Oregon Forest Resources Institute Paul Barnum, Chandalin shared information about our international fellowship program and how the World Forestry Center works to create "global connections" for professionals in the forest sector.
 
Stuty, now a PhD candidate at Oregon State University, explained her recent work comparing community forestry in Nepal and the Forest Collaborative process on national forests in the western United States. Rick shared information about forest types found around the world and international sustainable development objectives that relate to Oregon. He then conducted a simulation using international examples to help managers spot opportunities to connect diverse social, economic, and environmental objectives.
 
"In the future, more and more forest management issues will have an international dimension," said Chandalin. "It was an honor for us to be invited to be part of the ALP program. This group is the next generation of agency leaders in Oregon."
WFC Facility Rentals
The World Forestry Center is an ideal location to remember the life of a loved one.  We were honored Jed Gilchrist selected Cheatham Hall for his parents' memorial service.  Below are his reflections from the event. 
On February 27, friends and family gathered to remember and celebrate the lives of my parents, William and Jeanne Gilchrist, both of whom were longtime friends of the World Forestry Center. Jeanne passed in 2007 and William passed in December of last year. The two were 63 and 74, respectively.
 
I chose the World Forestry Center because of all the fond memories I had as a child wandering its halls in the early '80s. Being a woodworker and furniture maker himself, my father spent a lot of time at the World Forestry Center as a volunteer and exhibitor, and I distinctly remember being entranced for what seemed like hours by the glowing, talking tree in the lobby as well as the motorized logging dioramas elsewhere in the halls. One of his display pieces, affectionately titled "dogwood table" (named because my dad carved the family dog's footprints on its surface), is still intact and was on display at the service with its original placard and price tag. 
 
Cheatham Hall was ideal for the "Gilchrist Museum" that I tried to create, and its layout allowed visitors to roam amongst the memories freely. Photos, sketches, song lyrics, medals, awards and woodworking pieces were all out and available for everyone to see and touch to remind them of the great people who had passed. Given their history with the World Forestry Center and the way the event turned out, I couldn't imagine holding it anywhere else. Thank you so much for the opportunity!
 
-Jed Gilchrist
Cheatham Hall
Photo from Gilchrist Service

Community Events
Taking Cross Laminated Timber to New Heights 

An international panel of experts discuss how Oregon's cross laminated timber industry is revolutionizing design, architecture and construction around the world. Panelists include  Andrew Waugh, Principal, Waugh Thistleton Architects,  Valerie Johnson, President, DR Johnson Lumber and  Thomas Robinson, Principal, Lever Architecture.

Date: 4/20/2016 
Time: 7:30 AM TO 8:45 AM 

Presented by: 
Event Location:    
Sentinel Hotel 
614 S.W. 11th Avenue,  4th Floor 
Portland, OR 97205
 
Click  here to register or for more information.
NW Community Forest Forum   

The Third Annual Northwest Community Forest Forum will build on past years' discussions to address common challenges and barriers-financial, communications, political, and otherwise-to expanding community forests throughout the Pacific Northwest. The presentations, panels, small group discussions, and networking opportunities will inform and advance the work of the Northwest Community Forest Coalition, resulting in clear action items for the next year.

Date: May 9-10, 2016

Event Location:    
World Forestry Center
Portland, OR
 
Click  here to register or for more information.
Celebrate Trade 

Entitled Celebrate Trade, the elegant evening gala raises funds for the tax-exempt Oregon Consular Corps Scholarship Fund which provides scholarships to students at four Oregon universities. These funds allow Oregon's next generation of leaders to study abroad, gain international experience and expand their own cultural competence as they prepare to enter an increasingly global workplace.

Date: May 18, 2016

Event Location:    
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR
 
Click  here to register or for more information.
Maintaining Magnificence: Tree Preservation in Urban Areas

We know the myriad benefits trees provide, but how do we value, preserve, and care for healthy mature trees, stands of trees, and forested corridors in and around our cities? Can large beautiful trees co-exist with new housing developments? Is there a better way to include and plan for the care of these great community trees that have literally stood the test of time? What options do satellite and GIS technologies provide in assisting communities to effectively maintain the magnificence of these trees? 

Date: June 2, 2016

Event Location:    
World Forestry Center, Miller Hall
Portland, OR
 
Click  here to register or for more information.
Forest Products Society International Convention

The annual International Convention is the premier event for professionals in the forest products industry. The Convention brings together hundreds of scientists, design professionals, managers, decision makers, and others from academia, government, nonprofit, and private industry sectors to discuss the state of forest products research and learn about innovations in the field.

Date: June 27-29, 2016

Event Location:    
Portland Marriot Downtown Waterfront
Portland, OR
 
Click  here to register or for more information.
2016 Donors
President's Club and Canopy 
Club Corporate Members
Northwest Farm Credit Services
Stoel Rives LLP
 
Crown Club and Friends of the 
Forest Corporate Members
Gramark Company LLC 
Harrigan Lumber Company, Inc. 
IFA Nurseries Inc. 
Lone Rock Timber Management Co. 
RSG Forest Products, Inc. 
Walsh Trucking Co, LTD. 

Gifts of $100,000 to $300,000
William Hagenstein Trust
Merlo Foundation
 
Gifts of $10,000 to $99,999
Hummel Charitable Fund of the Bank of America 
  Charitable Gift Fund
David and Brette Hampton

Gifts of $5,000 to $9,999
Louis W. Hill, Jr. Subfund of the World Forestry 
   Center Endowment Fund
Dieter and Gabriele Siempelkamp
 
Gifts of $1,000 to $4,999
Freres Foundation 
Eric E. Larson
B. Bond Starker
Tumac Lumber Company Fund of the OCF 
Walker Family Foundation 
Sustainable Forestry Initiative
Gifts of $250 to $999
Columbia Sportswear Company
Andrew J. Meigs
Blair Freeman

Gifts of $100 to $249
Dean and Joan DeChaine 
JP Morgan Chase Foundation
Franklyn K. Brown

50th Anniversary Gala
Hampton Affiliates 
Rhett W. Carlile 
Hester H. Nau
Jeff Nuss 
Arlene and Jordan Schnitzer 
Stimson Lumber Company 
Stoel Rives
Joanne Lilley
Dean and Joan DeChaine

Gifts up to $99
Christine Bieker
Bruce T. Mateer
Bobbie L. Richey
Forrest Richen
Carla Eisner
Ian Dees
Greg Fullem
Robert O. Curtis
Robyn Powell Herbold

In Memory Of:
Margaret J. Torheim in memory of Bob Torheim


Learn More About The World Forestry Center
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We are located in Washington Park at:
4033 SW Canyon Rd 
Portland, Oregon 97221

Contact Us:
GENERAL INFORMATION
Michelle Coumarbatch 
Office Manager
503-228-1367 x100


OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT
Wendy Mitchell
Director
503-488-2111

Amber Morrison
Manager
503-488-2122

INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
Zakary Johnson
Database Administrator
503-488-2134
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Eric Vines
503-488-2119

Leigh Goldberg
Director of Communications
503-488-2139

Rick Zenn
Senior Fellow
503-488-2103

Reade Weber
Special Projects Manager
503-488-2107

EVENT SERVICES
Jennifer Kent
Director
503-488-2117

Angie Garcia
Manager
503-488-2101

Chuck Wiley
Facilities & Maintenance Manager 
503-488-2138
FINANCIAL DIRECTOR
Darlene Boles, C.P.A.
503-488-2112


WORLD FOREST INSTITUTE
Sara Wu
Director
503-488-2130

Chandalin Bennett
Senior Programs Manager
503-488-2137

Shadia Duery
Programs Manager
503-488-2110
PUBLIC PROGRAMS
Mark Reed
Director
503-488-2102

Rob Pierce
Education Director
503-488-2118

Louise George
Visitor Services Manager
503-488-2114 

Liam Hassett
Tree Farm Manager
503-625-7471