Kitchen Angels   |    1222 Siler Road  Santa Fe, NM  87507   |    505.471.7780
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APRIL 2020
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Thank you for your on-going dedication and support of Kitchen Angels and the community of Santa Fe.

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VOLUNTEER
MILESTONE
ANNIVERSARIES

1 Year
Morgan Honeycutt
Rachael Greenstein
 
10 Years
Ben Alaimo-Monson
 
28 Years
(our founders)
TonyD'Agostino
Leise Sargent
Anna Stillmaker
 
 

IN MEMORIAM


Celebrating the lives of our volunteers and clients


Irene L.
 
 

A gush of bird-song, a patter of dew, 
A cloud, and a rainbow's warning, 
Suddenly sunshine and perfect blue.
An April day in the morning.  
    
                                           Harriet Prescott Spofford

From the Executive Director . . . 

We're living through extraordinary times.  

You didn't need me to tell you that.  Still, I find it helps me to remember that there is nothing to guide us except our own intelligence, thoughtfulness, kindness and compassion.

Kitchen Angels was born out of a crisis - the AIDS epidemic.  And so, responding to a crisis is built into our DNA.  It's who we are and why we do what we do.  

Words are insufficient to describe how proud and humbled I am by everyone's commitment to our clients' wellbeing and the care and kindness our volunteers, staff and Board members are showing each other.  Each day seems to bring a new challenge for us to figure out, and that's exactly what we're doing.  

Stephen Colbert said in a recent podcast, "This is one great nation, united by our belief in, and our need for, each other and reinforced by my belief that the American people, like all people, are essentially good and always want to know how to do the right thing."  Kitchen Angels certainly exemplifies that sentiment.

We will be different when this is over.  Holly L. Thomas writes in a piece about the impact the coronavirus will have, "a s we focus on finding solutions, what will ultimately matter - the real life skills - will come from how we work them out together."    

To all of Kitchen Angels' family, thank you, for your diligence, your support, your commitment, and your kindness.  Each of you is a true angel.

In gratitude,
AnnouncementsAnnouncements

Where will Angels Dine?

At home, of course!  At least this year.  

Angels Dine Out has been renamed to Angels Dine In.  And while we can't gather at our favorite restaurants and share a meal with friends and family in support of Kitchen Angels, we can continue to support local restaurants by ordering take-out, taking your meal home, and sharing it with your loved ones at home. You can even make a party by inviting friends to dine together through one of the virtual meeting platforms like Zoom or Go To Meetings.

These are restaurants that have always been there for Kitchen Angels.  Let's be there for them!

315 Restaurant & Wine Bar  * Amaya  * Andiamo  Arroyo Vino  Bouche Bistro  * Bourbon Grill  Caf é  Castro * Cafecito * Café Fina * Caf é  Pasqual's * Cafecito * Cowgirl BBQ * Dolina Café & Bakery * El Mes ó n * El Nido * Estevan Restaurant * Fire & Hops * Harry's Roadhouse * Herve Wine Bar * India House * Izanami * Jambo Caf é *  Joe's Dining * La Casa Sena * La Fogata Grill * La Plancha de Eldorado *  L'Olivier * Lucky Goat * Mariscos Costa Azu * Museum Hill Caf é *  Osteria D'Assisi * Paloma * Paper Dosa * Pecos Trail Caf é *  Piccolino Italian Restaurant Plaza Caf é  Southside * San Francisco Street Bar & Grill * Santa Fe Bite * Terra Cotta Wine Bistro The Ranch House * The Teahouse * Trattoria a Mano Tune Up Caf é 


Ron Wieneke making desserts and practicing social distancing.
 
On the right, Dwayne Trujillo and Tamara Prochorchik instruct drivers on the updated
                delivery protocols.



Staying Healthy . . . 
 
The latest information seems to indicate that the vast majority of people infected with the 2019 novel Coronavirus won't develop severe symptoms.  In fact, many won't even realize they're sick.  That's why it's so important to limit close contact with others and to stay home if you're not feeling well or if you live with or are caring for someone who isn't well.   We simply can't risk the health of our homebound clients by exposing them to the virus through their meal delivery. We have a robust substitute volunteer list, so don't hesitate to call Lauren if you even suspect you might be coming down with something. It's better to be on the safe side...especially right now. 

The New Mexico Department of Health has an excellent Coronavirus website with the latest information and links to important and useful information on staying safe, staying healthy, and what to do if you begin to feel ill.



Tasty TidbitsTastyTidbits


Haiku

Well, maybe haiku isn't food for the stomach, but it is food for the spirit.  April 17 is  NATIONAL HAIKU POETRY DAY. The day is intended to encourage everyone to try their hand at creativity. 

Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry that is non-rhyming and normally consists of 3 lines with a syllable pattern of 5-7-5.  Haiku poems are usually inspired by an element of nature, a season, a moment of beauty or an individual experience or event. Sensory language is used to capture a feeling or image.

English haiku does not always follow the strict syllable count found in Japanese haiku. The typical length of haiku found in English language journals is 10-14 syllables, versus the 5-7-5 syllables used in the Japanese language.

Even the Kitchen Angels phone message transcription-to-email software wants to get in the act with this recent suggestion:

She. 
Said. 
You. 
Do. 
You you you you you you will. 
Be. 
Good.

You can celebrate National Haiku Poetry Day by creating a haiku poem of your own!  Post your Haiku poem on social media here.  

Using Pantry Staples and Other Advice . . . 

We've al l been faced with the task of coming u p with a meal at the last minute, going through the kitchen cabinets or the refrigerator, and thinking "what the heck can I make?"  The folks at Kitchn  can offer some help.

When it comes to whipping up quick and comforting meals, pantry staples can be your friend, they claim. These are the items you keep stashed in the back of your pantry for off-the-cuff cooking, and they are the items that will come in handy when cooking more at home - as we all are right now. With a little bit of creativity, you can turn these staple ingredients, like canned tomatoes and tuna, into complete meals that are comforting, filling, and delicious.

Here  are ten of the most common pantry staples as a starting point as well as recipes and suggestions for how to transform each into a quick and comforting meal.  Each recipe is flexible and highly adaptable for whatever you may have on hand, so definitely don't fret if you don't have all the ingredients. 

Social distancing is the new world order, at least for the next few months.  And people are finding creative ways to stay connected, as this article in a recent edition of the New York Times
points out.  Folks are  holding  birthday  parties and  bar mitzvahs  over video chat, broadcasting D.J. sets  and streaming concerts and establishing  quarantine movie nights  on Twitter for "virtual companionship."  

If it's how to safely exercise during this time you're interested in, here are some things to consider, also courtesy of the New York Times.

If you're not sure if your symptoms are allergies, the flu or COVID-19, here's some information that may help.

Volunteer OpportunitiesVolunteerOpportunities 

While we always welcome new volunteers, we are currently focused on using existing volunteers to cover as many tasks as possible.  We understand that some of you may not be able to give of your time at present.  
   
If you are a current volunteer and you haven't completed your COVID-19 self-assessment, please do so and send it to info@kitchenangels.org  before your next shift so that you can keep volunteering.

We are streamlining many of our processes to use the fewest number of volunteers possible.  This is an effort to both practice social distancing protocols and to minimize the number of people who touch clients' deliveries.

Please don't be offended if we ask you to refrain from volunteering from time-to-time.  By reducing the number of people in the building, we're reducing the likelihood of exposure to the novel coronavirus.  This is only a temporary situation.  We will need you to serve as "relief" volunteers as the pandemic continues.

Thank you for your understanding and your kindness, and for taking care of yourselves.
Continuing EducationContinuingEducation  

So many of us seem to be a bit overwhelme d by the need to keep the coronavirus out of our homes that we become a bit overzealous about washing produce when we get home from the store.  Here's some research-based, scientific information from our friend Cydney Martin , Associate Professor, Family & Consumer Sciences Agent with the County Extension Service.  As Cydney says, "Don 't believe everything you see on the internet!"

Using soapy water to clean food products can lead to health problems such as mild gastrointestinal irritation with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain. That's because produce is porous, so it can absorb soap.

According to the USDA, consumers should not wash fruits and vegetables with detergent or soap. These products are not approved or labeled by the FDA for use on food.

 

Other unscientific advice floating around the Internet includes using a diluted bleach solution, lemon juice or vinegar to wash produce. There is no scientific evidence that any of these work to kill the COVID-19 virus. And, ingesting bleach is dangerous.

 

The practice of quarantining and then sanitizing food containers before putting them in the refrigerator or pantry isn't necessary. There is no evidence that food or food packaging are transmission vehicles for Coronavirus. Best practice is to wash your hands after handling packaged foods.


Here's what to do:
  • Rinse fresh fruits and vegetables with running cold water. That will remove 90 to 99% of what's on the outer skin; and
  • Limit your time in the grocery store.
Always remember to wash your hands after putting away groceries, before preparing a meal, and before you eat.
Best of Santa Fe Nominations a re  In

The nominations are in for the Santa Fe Reporter's Best of Santa Fe 2020. Voting will begin in May.  Keep up your support by voting for Kitchen Angels and KITCHENALITY.  Look for us in the following categories:
 
Best Nonprofit:
Kitchen Angels

Best Business: 
Siler Rd. Corridor:
Kitchenality

Best Specialty Food/Cooking Store:
Kitchenality
 
Best Thrift Store:
Kitchenality

Your show of support makes all the difference.  We'll keep you posted when the voting begins. 

Kitchen Angels | 505-471-7780 | info@kitchenangels.org | http://www.kitchenangels.org
1222 Siler Road
Santa Fe, NM 87507