June 25, 2020

In today's issue: The USO – How It All Began Special Event, Stephen Drury Smith on Eleanor's radio career, FDR's Rare Bird Books, Women's Right to Vote Pop Ups, an Alphabetical Virtual Museum Tour, the GI Bill, and Member Exclusives.

UPCOMING PROGRAMS
In 1941 FDR created the United Services Organization, more simply and popularly known as the USO, to 'bring a little bit of home' to the young Americans who were serving in the Armed Forces across the globe. Since 2004 the Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum has honored that tradition by hosting its own USO style show for packed houses. Live Q&A to follow in the comments.
PROGRAM ARCHIVES
From June 2015:
Stephen Drury Smith’s The First Lady of Radio: Eleanor Roosevelt’s Historic Broadcasts started as a radio documentary. He examines Mrs. Roosevelt’s learning process – “She was not a natural” – and how she adopted the medium as a communications tool to become a successful radio personality.

Executive Editor and Host of APM Reports
Stephen Drury Smith
FEATURES AND DIVERSIONS

FDR Library Director Paul Sparrow explores FDR's world-class collection of first edition books on ornithology, including all of the John James Audubon editions. As a teenager, FDR joined the American Ornithologists’ Union and kept detailed bird diaries of his sightings. This passion continued for the rest of his life, and he even participated in an annual bird counting event in the Hudson Valley while president.





Our #MuseumAlphabet campaign began last week with A is for Amberjack II. At the end of the First 100 Days, Franklin Roosevelt went sailing. He left Marion, MA, at the helm of a small rented sloop called the Amberjack II. See the virtual exhibit»



B is for Beer Barrel Mug! This week's #MuseumAlphabet artifact is a 1930s ceramic mug that celebrated both the New Deal and the return of legal beer after passage of the Beer-Wine Revenue Act in 1933. See the virtual exhibit»






This week marks the 76th anniversary of Franklin Roosevelt signing the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, more popularly known as the GI Bill of Rights. Although World War II was far from over, FDR was determined to plan ahead for a smooth transition to peace, both abroad and at home.



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Want early access to our virtual show The USO: How It All Began and exclusive invitations to members-only virtual and in-person events like trivia night and exhibit previews? Sign up to become a member today!
"Whatever our individual circumstances or opportunities, we are all in it, and our spirit is good... and do not let anyone tell you anything different." FDR, Oct 12, 1942, fireside chat.

To do our part during this period of social distancing, we will be sending a weekly digest of online programs, resources, and diversions.
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