Your Weekly Dose of #5ThoughtsFriday: A description of what we think is important at BIAMD
  #5ThoughtsFriday
11/17/2017
On November 9th, #5ThoughtsFriday
was Awarded the Brain Injury Association of America's Excellence in Communications Award for 2017.

Thanks to All of our Readers and Fans that made this award possible!

#5ThoughtsFriday is Powered By :
Here are the 5 things we thought were
worth sharing with you this week:
Since 2014, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have enacted one or more traumatic brain injury (TBI) laws, more commonly known as concussion laws. These laws often include mandates to remove athletes from play following an actual or suspected concussion, requirements to be cleared to return to play, and annual education of coaches, parents, and/or athletes regarding concussion signs or symptoms. A recent study from the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital done in conjunction with researchers from Colorado School of Public Health at the University at Colorado and Temple University used data from a large, national sports injury surveillance system to determine the effect of state-level TBI laws on trends of new and recurrent concussions among US high school athletes.

The study, published in the American Journal of Public Health, showed that the rates of new and recurrent concussions initially increase after a law goes into effect. "This is what we want to see," explained Ginger Yang, PhD, MPH, senior author of the study and principal investigator in the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's. "Most TBI laws require athletes, athletic trainers, and/or coaches to report all suspected and/or actual TBIs and concussions. So what happens is that after a law is enacted you see an initial increase because more people become aware of the symptoms and signs of concussion. Many concussions that were going unreported or undiagnosed before are starting to get reported."
Approximately 2 ½ years after the law is in place the rate of recurrent concussions shows a significant decline. This demonstrates that the laws are having an impact.

For More on this exciting report, CLICK HERE.
BOSTON — The brain arrived in April, delivered to the basement of the hospital without ceremony, like all the others. There were a few differences with this one — not because it was more important, but because it was more notorious.

It went to the lab outside the city, instead of the one in Boston, where most of the examinations are performed these days, because it was less likely to attract attention that way. Instead of being carried in through the service entrance, it was ushered in secretly through the underground tunnel system. The brain was given a pseudonym, and only three people knew how to identify it.

Other than that, the brain came alone and disconnected from its past, unattached to its celebrity. The sordid details of the man’s rise and fall, the speculation over what went wrong, the debate over justice — all that was left behind for others to assess.

Whose brain was it and what was the surprise?

Seizures are a common result of traumatic brain injury, especially in military veterans. A new study funded by the DOD, Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs, and conducted in Providence RI and Birmingham AL (at the Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in Providence, RI and Birmingham, AL, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University and the University of Alabama at Birmingham) hopes to shed new light on the mechanism behind seizures associated with post-traumatic epilepsy and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

The $3.6 million award, W81XWH-17-1-0619 will examine whether a form of cognitive behavior therapy, a short-term, goal-oriented psychotherapy approach to problem-solving, could be effective in reducing the frequency and/or severity of seizures in those with TBI. Cognitive behavior therapy has been widely used for improving mental health. It focuses on developing coping strategies to treat specific problems and decrease symptoms of the disorder.

For more, CLICK HERE
 2) What We Are Reading That You Might Enjoy...
Feeling directionless, or perhaps too intimidated to make a necessary change in your life? Tired of letting your fears keep you from achieving your goals or becoming healthier, happier, or more successful? If so, this book is for you. Popular life coach and consultant Adam Smith has created a powerful method to help you harness your inner passion and drive to overcome whatever is holding you back.

The Bravest You  presents the five-step Bravery Process™, an easy and highly effective way to master our biggest fears. Offering inspiring and helpful advice, Smith guides you through each of stage of the process—Complacency, Inspiration, Fear, Passion, Bravery—showing how to identify goals and passions and apply the Bravery Process to any circumstance. These proven techniques will empower you to conquer your doubts once and for all and become your bravest self. 

Covering the ten most common fears all successful people face, from the fears of inadequacy and being judged, to rejection, failure, loss of control, and loneliness,  The Bravest You  arms you with the necessary tools to tackle any fear-inducing situation head-on and lead the braver, happier, and more successful life you’ve always imagined.

For The Book, 

  (If you decide to buy anything mentioned in #5ThoughtsFriday, don't forget to use  Amazon Smile  and select the Brain Injury Association of Maryland as your donation beneficiary.) 
1) Quote We Are Contemplating...

“Constantly improve your skills. Yesterday’s world records are today’s entry level requirements.”


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HAVE A TERRIFIC WEEKEND. 
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  Thanks for reading! Have a wonderful weekend.
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