Your Weekly Dose of #5ThoughtsFriday: A description of what we think is important at BIAMD
   #5ThoughtsFriday
07/28/2017
Here are the 5 things we thought were
worth sharing with you this week:

It’s a matter of resilience, the innate ability of all physiological systems to continue functioning despite injury and disease. Unlike such organs as the lungs or kidneys, there’s no second brain should the first falter, nor can the brain regenerate like the liver. “The brain is the ultimate high-rent district,” says David Bennett, professor of neuroscience at Rush Medical School and director of the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center. But it also boasts unique ways to keep on keeping on, such as the neuroplasticity that allows intact areas to take over functions lost by diseased or injured tissue.


“The brain doesn’t want to be demented,” Bennett says, “and it has means to protect itself.”


To read more, CLICK HERE

When it comes to memory, our brains are typically no better than an 8GB USB storage device.


In the modern world, information bombards us constantly. And if we rely on our 8GB capacity to memorize as much as possible, the only way to make it fit is to store it at a low resolution. When we come to review what we’ve learned, we’re dismayed to find only ‘blurred’ information and vague approximations of what was so clear when we experienced it


In the past the top priority for human brains was survival. Let’s leave the modern world of computers behind for a moment, and travel back in time to when the informational landscape was very different.  Put yourself in the prehistoric shoes of one of your early ancestors.The prehistoric environment was challenging and harsh. So for much of your time you’d have been motivated by basic survival – how to sustain your life (food, shelter, relationships); and how to deal with threats (predatory animals, weather conditions


In other words, ‘prehistoric-you’ would not have elevated memorization to be a primary goal, but would have prioritized processing information like thinking ‘this is a dangerous area’, ‘this is edible’. 


The more civilized we got, the more we needed to remember


Intrigued?  CLICK HERE
30th Annual BIAMD Conference 
Call for Presentations
Due Date: Oct. 20, 2017  
Conference Date: March 15 -16, 2018 
Radisson North Baltimore, Timonium MD

The Conference Presentation Selection Committee will meet in October and November. Decisions will be made and announced by the end of November. 

Up to 2 presenters per session will attend for free on the day of their presentation and a discounted rate to cover food and material costs on the day that they are not presenting. 

(The Brain Injury Association of Maryland is unable to pay for presenters' travel, lodging, meals or other expenses associated with the conference. We greatly appreciate your time and interest.)

Please click the button below and complete all steps outlined on the online application.

If you have any questions, please call Caitlin Starr at 410.448.2924.

It's Sunday evening but instead of relaxing with your family, you're sitting in front of your home computer. There are just a few emails you have to send out before the week starts, a couple of projects you want to complete in the quiet before the phone calls and urgent emails begin arriving the next morning. You're tired, and vaguely cranky to find yourself working on what's supposed to be a day of rest. But it needs to get done, so you push through.


If you're anything like me, this will sound all too familiar. The thing is, it's bad for your brain. A growing body of scientific evidence explains what many of us have learned from unpleasant experience: Push yourself through too many hours or days of work and your brain starts to push back. Ideas that once flowed easily dry up, and tasks that you should be able to perform quickly become excruciatingly difficult. If you're like me, at that point, you feel tempted to scold yourself to buckle down and work harder. That's completely counterproductive--you need to give your brain, and yourself, some rest.


Please read this interesting perspective,  CLICK HERE.  
  2) What We Are Reading That You Might Enjoy...

In SPARK, John J. Ratey, M.D., embarks upon a fascinating and entertaining journey through the mind-body connection, presenting startling research to prove that exercise is truly our best defense against everything from depression to ADD to addiction to aggression to menopause to Alzheimer's. Filled with amazing case studies (such as the revolutionary fitness program in Naperville, Illinois, which has put this school district of 19,000 kids first in the world of science test scores), SPARK is the first book to explore comprehensively the connection between exercise and the brain. It will change forever the way you think about your morning run---or, for that matter, simply the way you thin.


For The Book,  CLICK HERE.

To Listen to a Brian Johnson's Podcast interview with Dr. Ratey CLICK HERE.  


  (If you decide to buy anything mentioned in #5ThoughtsFriday, don't forget to use  Amazon Smile  and select the Brain Injury Association of Maryland as your donation beneficiary.) 
1) Quote We Are Contemplating...

No one ever became great except through many and great mistakes.

Did you enjoy #5ThoughtsFriday?  If so, please forward this email to a friend! 

Got a story we need to follow or share?  Send it to info@biamd.org.

 

Want to find a story from a past #5ThoughtsFriday blog posts, visit the archive by clicking HERE.


 Please let us know your requests and suggestions by emailing us at info@biamd.org or contacting us on Twitter. 


 Which bullet above is your favorite? What do you want more or less of? Let us know! Just send a tweet to @biamd1 and put #5ThoughtsFriday in there so we can find it.


 Thanks for reading! Have a wonderful weekend.

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