Your Weekly Dose of #5ThoughtsFriday: A description of what we think is important at BIAMD
   #5ThoughtsFriday
05/12/2017


#5ThoughtsFriday is  
Powered By

Maryland's Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Board has THREE openings for new Board Members.

We apologize that Last Week's #5ThoughtsFriday  had a  broken link
for the 

Please Click the Button below to Apply for this important volunteer opportunity. 
Here are the 5 things we thought were
worth sharing with you this week:
5)  Study finally shows how slow breathing induces          tranquility

Try it. Breathe slowly and smoothly. A pervasive sense of calm descends. Now breathe rapidly and frenetically. Tension mounts. Why?

It’s a question that has never been answered by science, until now.

In a new study, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their colleagues have identified a handful of nerve cells in the brainstem that connect breathing to states of mind.

A paper describing the findings were published March 31 in ScienceMark Krasnow, MD, PhD, professor of biochemistry, is the senior author. The lead author is former Stanford graduate student Kevin Yackle, MD, PhD, now a faculty fellow at the University of California-San Francisco.

Medical practitioners sometimes prescribe breathing-control exercises for people with stress disorders. Similarly, the practice of pranayama — controlling breath in order to shift one’s consciousness from an aroused or even frantic state to a more meditative one — is a core component of virtually all varieties of yoga.

“This study is intriguing because it provides a cellular and molecular understanding of how that might work,” Krasnow said.  

Find out more about this study, take a breath and CLICK HERE
                                                                                                                      (AP File Photo)
4)  The same brain disease battering the NFL may have killed Ernest Hemingway

In one of Ernest Hemingway’s first published stories, a man goes into the woods and meets a disfigured prizefighter — insightful, though prone to fits of paranoia and violence.

“You’re all right,” says the visitor after they’ve chatted a while.

“No, I’m not. I’m crazy,” the fighter says. “Listen, you ever been crazy?”

“No. How does it get you?”

“I don’t know. When you got it you don’t know about it.”

Nearly a century after “The Battler” was written, psychiatrist Andrew Farah contends, we would recognize that the prizefighter suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy or CTE — the same concussion-induced brain disease now infamous in sports, particularly professional football.

And the prizefighter’s renowned author had CTE, too, Farah argues in his new book, “Hemingway’s Brain.”

The psychiatrist from High Point University in North Carolina writes of nine serious blows to Hemingway’s head — from explosions to a plane crash — that were a prelude to his decline into abusive rages, “paranoia with specific and elaborate delusions” and the final violence of his suicide in 1961.

Hemingway’s bizarre behavior in his latter years (he rehearsed his death by gunshot in front of dinner guests, for example) has been blamed on iron deficiency, bipolar disorder, attention-seeking and any number of other problems.

After researching the writer’s letters, books and hospital visits, Farah is convinced that Hemingway had dementia — made worse by alcoholism and other maladies, but dominated by CTE, the improper treatment of which likely hastened his death.

To check out this intriguing article, CLICK HERE

3) Traumatic Brain Injuries May be Helped with Drug Used to Treat Bipolar Disorder

In research published in Scientific Reports on May 8, Rutgers scientists discovered that lithium – used as a mood stabilizer and to treat depression and bipolar disorder – and rapamycin, a treatment for some forms of cancer, protected nerve cells in the brain and stopped the chemical glutamate from sending signals to other cells and creating further brain cell damage.

“Many medications now used for those suffering with traumatic brain injury focus on treating the symptoms and stopping the pain instead of protecting any further damage from occurring,” said lead author Bonnie Firestein, professor in the Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience in the School of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. “We wanted to find a drug that could protect the cells and keep them from dying.”

To read more about this study,  CLICK HERE

  2) What We Are Reading That You Might Enjoy...

Hemingway’s Brain is an innovative biography and the first forensic psychiatric examination of Nobel Prize–winning author Ernest Hemingway. After committing seventeen years to researching Hemingway’s life and medical history, Andrew Farah, a forensic psychiatrist, has concluded that the writer’s diagnoses were incorrect. Contrary to the commonly accepted diagnoses of bipolar disorder and alcoholism, Farah provides a comprehensive explanation of the medical conditions that led to Hemingway’s suicide.


Hemingway’s Brain provides a full and accurate accounting of this psychiatric diagnosis by exploring the genetic influences, traumatic brain injuries, and neurological and psychological forces that resulted in what many have described as his tortured final years. It aims to eliminate the confusion and define for all future scholarship the specifics of the mental illnesses that shaped legendary literary works and destroyed the life of a master.

For More, CLICK HERE. 

  (If you decide to buy anything mentioned in #5ThoughtsFriday, don't forget to use  Amazon Smile  and select the Brain Injury Association of Maryland as your donation beneficiary.) 
1) Quote We Are Contemplating...

"I don't want to get to the end of my life and find that I lived just the length of it. I want to have lived the width of it as well."
                                                                                                                                    - @DianeSAckerman
Did you enjoy #5ThoughtsFriday?  If so, please forward this email to a friend! 

Got a story we need to follow or share?  Send it to info@biamd.org.

 Want to find a story from a past #5ThoughtsFriday blog posts, visit the archive by clicking HERE.

 Please let us know your requests and suggestions by emailing us at info@biamd.org or contacting us on Twitter. 

 Which bullet above is your favorite? What do you want more or less of? Let us know! Just send a tweet to @biamd1 and put #5ThoughtsFriday in there so we can find it.

 Thanks for reading! Have a wonderful weekend.

Name | Company | Phone | Fax | Email | Website