Your Weekly Dose of #5ThoughtsFriday: A description of what we think is important at BIAMD
  #5ThoughtsFriday
09/28/2018
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The 2018 BIAMD
Scarecrow Classic
is
SUNDAY!
WE'VE EXTENDED LAST MINUTE ONLINE REGISTRATION TIL MIDNIGHT TONIGHT.
Sun, Sep 30, 2018 8:30 AM EST
Scarecrow Classic 5k and 1 Mile Walk
University of Maryland - Baltimore County, Catonsville









SEPTEMBER 30, 2018
Scarecrow Classic 5k/1Mile

This year we are
Celebrating the life of Chris Burdette
Sun, Sep 30, 2018 8:30 AM EST
DONATE NOW - TEAM DONATION PAGE for Scarecrow Classic 5k and 1 Mile Walk
University of Maryland - Baltimore County, Catonsville
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Join Scarecrow Ops Team as a Volunteer !

Click Below, select your Job, your Shift,
and join the fun!.

Great way to receive Community Service Hours for Graduation Requirements.
Here are the 5 things we thought were
worth sharing with you this week:
Prevalence is higher in states with higher estimates of private health insurance
The lifetime prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among children age <17 years was an estimated 2.5%, based on parents' reports of healthcare professionals' diagnoses, an analysis of national survey data found.

This represents more than 1.8 million children nationally. Unlike previous estimates, it likely includes TBIs that were treated in settings other than emergency departments (EDs), reported Juliet Haarbauer-Krupa, PhD, of the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues in  JAMA Pediatrics .

Across the country, estimates of TBI ranged from an age-adjusted prevalence of 1.2% in Mississippi to 5.3% in Maine, with prevalence higher in states with higher estimates of private health insurance (OR 1.36) or parent-reported adequate insurance (OR 1.16). "This could result in a greater likelihood of seeking healthcare after TBI, which may lead to higher estimates of diagnosed TBIs," Haarbauer-Krupa told MedPage Today.

But it "could also indicate that some childhood TBIs go untreated for lack of health insurance," she observed.
ine in neurons to produce plasticity.

CLICK HERE to see see more on the findings.
Photo: Rebeca Savage
Rebecca Savage had the discussion about drugs with her sons. They had the discussion about alcohol.

They didn't have the discussion about prescription drugs. 
"Prescription drug use 2½ years ago was not even on our radar," Rebecca Savage told  All the Moms .

Her two honor-student high school graduates died June 14, 2015 after coming home from a graduation party. 
Her sons, ages 18 and 19, weren't drug abusers.
They simply said yes at a party when someone offered them pills. 

The Indiana mom has spoken about her sons to about 60,000 students and parents since their deaths. She wants to help teens find a way to say no when they're offered drugs of any kind. 

Savage recently raised the profile of her advocacy work by partnering with Walgreens. On Wednesday, Sept. 26 she will be speaking to 19,000 students about her sons' deaths as part of  WE Day UN , a youth empowerment event at Barclays Center in Brooklyn. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Sarah Michelle Gellar and British royal princess Beatrice are also scheduled to speak.

Savage also will speak about  Walgreens Safe Medication Disposal Program . This year, Walgreens will install 1,000 medication disposal kiosks in its stores. Since the drug store chain began the program in 2016, stores have collected 270 tons of prescriptions from people who no longer need the medications and don't want them to fall into the wrong hands. 

CLICK HERE t o learn more about this mother's courage.
Relaxing restrictions on patient privacy could prevent individuals with addiction from seeking medical treatment in the first place.
T The American Medical Association is opposing a change to patient privacy laws that would allow doctors to more freely share information about a patient’s history of substance use, a proposal that has divided the health care community and highlighted some of the challenges of addressing the opioid epidemic.

In a letter to lawmakers obtained by STAT, the AMA said it believed there was a “fundamental misunderstanding” among groups working to incorporate the proposal into a  sprawling opioids bill . Relaxing restrictions on patient privacy, the AMA wrote, could prevent individuals with addiction from seeking medical treatment in the first place.

The letter to Reps. Greg Walden (R-Ore.) and Frank Pallone (D-N.J.), the leaders of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, is a potentially fatal blow to the proposal, which has long enjoyed Walden’s support and that of a wide array of other lawmakers, including the House’s 12 physicians.

The powerful AMA, in entering the fray, is also pitting itself against a similarly strong coalition of groups, including the American Hospital Association, the American Society of Addiction Medicine, and insurers including Aetna, Cigna, Anthem, and Blue Cross Blue Shield.

“We do have concerns that [the proposal] could have unintended consequences and will not be as helpful in addressing the opioid abuse crisis as some people think,” an AMA spokesman wrote in an email to STAT.

CLICK HERE to find out more about this critical piece of legislation.
2) What We Are Reading We Think You Might Enjoy
Hey! You Can Win The Book Below!

Send an email to info@biamd.org with the
Subject Line: I Like To Read! and your name and mailing address in the email . We will enter your name into a drawing to receive a free copy of the book mailed to you for your reading pleasure!
Jeff was busy enjoying his family's summer vacation when suddenly his whole world came to a screeching halt.

During a ride in the country the brakes on his borrowed bike malfunctioned and catapulted him over he handlebars. As he lay unconscious, desperate measures were taken to save his life. The rescue workers, the surgeon, and the intensive care team would all do their parts to help him survive the severe head injury he suffered. Would he ever be the same: Would he ever walk again? Talk again?

Only one thing was certain...Jeff had a fighting chance because he'd been wearing a bike helmet.

Here is Jeff's story.
  (If you decide to buy anything mentioned in #5ThoughtsFriday, don't forget to use  Amazon Smile  and select the Brain Injury Association of Maryland as your donation beneficiary.) 
1) Quote We Are Contemplating...

"I don't have any bad habits...I'm good
at all of them"

Recruiting Registered Nurses of Individuals with SCI, TBI, and/or Burn Injury

The Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center   is conducting interviews with registered nurses (RNs) who provide care and services to individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury (TBI), and/or burn injury. Answers from the interviews will be used for research purposes to better understand (a) the health information needs of RNs who provide care and services for such injuries and (b) their participation in research studies. To be eligible to participate, RNs must meet the following criteria:

  • Must have provided services and care to patients with SCI,TBI, and/or burn injury in post-acute rehabilitation settings in the past 5 years
  • Must have 5 or more years of experience treating these injuries
  • Interviews will last approximately 60 minutes. Participants will receive $125 for their time.

Contact: If you’re interested in participating, please contact Dr. Ali Weinstein: 703-993-9632 or  aweinst2@gmu.edu .  
HAVE A TERRIFIC WEEKEND. 

Did you enjoy #5ThoughtsFriday? If so, please forward this email to a friend! 

Got a story we need to follow or share? Send it to info@biamd.org .  

Want to find a story from a past #5ThoughtsFriday blog posts, visit the archive by clicking HERE .

  Please let us know your requests and suggestions by emailing us at info@biamd.org or contacting us on Twitter. 

  Which bullet above is your favorite? What do you want more or less of? Let us know! Just send a tweet to  @biamd1 and put #5ThoughtsFriday in there so we can find it.

  Thanks for reading! Have a wonderful weekend.