Your Weekly Dose of #5ThoughtsFriday: A description of what we think is important at BIAMD
   #5ThoughtsFriday
06/30/2017


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Here are the 5 things we thought were
worth sharing with you this week (plus a few more):
5) BIAMD's Great Friend: Jeff Wells
"From Patient to Research Advisor"

TRANSFORMING RESEARCH THROUGH PARTNERSHIPS

The PATIENTS Program leverages innovative partnerships with patient communities and health care systems to ensure that patients, health care providers, and other partners are actively engaged in research.

PATIENTS AND CAREGIVERS AS ADVISORS

The PATIENTS Program works with individuals to conduct research that is meaningful to the community in which they reside. Patients and caregivers are involved as advisors at every step of the research process.

TEACHING AND LEARNING FROM EACH OTHER

The PATIENTS Program believes that everyone has unique knowledge and skills to share. The program offers a wide range of training and resources in patient-centered outcomes research and other related topics.


To read more about this exciting program, CLICK HERE

To See Jeff's video, click the Photo above or CLICK HERE

Weird as it might sound, there are competitive rememberers out there who can memorize a deck of cards in seconds or dozens of words in minutes. So, naturally, someone decided to study them. It turns out that practicing their techniques doesn't just improve your memory — it can also change how your brain works.

There’s been a long-standing debate about whether memory athletes are born with superior memories, or whether their abilities are due to their training regimens. These tend to include an ancient memorization strategy called the method of loci, which involves visualizing important pieces of information placed at key stops along a mental journey. This journey can be an imaginary walk through your house or a local park, or your drive to work. The important thing is that you can mentally move back through it to retrieve the pieces of information you stored. (The ancient Greeks are said to have used it to remember important texts.)

Boris Nikolai Konrad, a memory coach and athlete who’s in the Guinness Book of World Records for memorizing 201 names and faces in just 15 minutes, chalks his superior memory abilities up to training with this and other mnemonic techniques. “It's a sport like any other,” Konrad told The Verge. Only, he adds, “you're not moving that much.” But practicing is key.

Improve Your Memory? Change Your Brain?  CLICK HERE
30th Annual BIAMD Conference 
Call for Presentations
Due Date: Oct. 20, 2017  
Conference Date: March 15 -16, 2018 
Radisson North Baltimore, Timonium MD

The Conference Presentation Selection Committee will meet in October and November. Decisions will be made and announced by the end of November. 

Up to 2 presenters per session will attend for free on the day of their presentation and a discounted rate to cover food and material costs on the day that they are not presenting. 

(The Brain Injury Association of Maryland is unable to pay for presenters' travel, lodging, meals or other expenses associated with the conference. We greatly appreciate your time and interest.)

Please click the button below and complete all steps outlined on the online application.

If you have any questions, please call Caitlin Starr at 410.448.2924.

Research published by scientists at the University of California, Riverside on “fear memory” could lead to the development of therapies that reduce the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).


To survive in a dynamic environment, animals develop adaptive fear responses to dangerous situations, requiring coordinated neural activity in the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and amygdala – three brain areas connected to one another. A disruption of this process leads to maladaptive generalized fear in PTSD, which affects 7 percent of the U.S. population.


Please take time to read about this research,  CLICK HERE. 

  2) What We Are Reading That You Might Enjoy...

One of the hardest parts of eating healthy for your brain is coming up with new ideas.

There are literally million of recipes online if you want to lose weight, shed belly fat, reduce carbs, or go gluten-free.


But if you want to eat right for your brain, there are very few recipe sources created specifically with brain health in mind.


Dean Alban is always on the lookout for new recipes for personal use.


She's amassed quite a stash of recipes that are delicious, easy to make, and rich in brain foods like blueberries, walnuts, salmon, green leafy vegetables, chocolate, avocado, and coconut.


She compiled a list of 50 recipes from her personal favorites that supply essential brain nutrientsthat are usually lacking in most diets.


Below each recipe link, she's listed the key ingredients that make it “brain-healthy.”


For Some Yummy (And Smart) ideas, CLICK HERE.

  (If you decide to buy anything mentioned in #5ThoughtsFriday, don't forget to use  Amazon Smile  and select the Brain Injury Association of Maryland as your donation beneficiary.) 
1) Quote We Are Contemplating...

“If you are tired of starting over, stop giving up.”

Did you enjoy #5ThoughtsFriday?  If so, please forward this email to a friend! 

Got a story we need to follow or share?  Send it to info@biamd.org.

 

Want to find a story from a past #5ThoughtsFriday blog posts, visit the archive by clicking HERE.


 Please let us know your requests and suggestions by emailing us at info@biamd.org or contacting us on Twitter. 


 Which bullet above is your favorite? What do you want more or less of? Let us know! Just send a tweet to @biamd1 and put #5ThoughtsFriday in there so we can find it.


 Thanks for reading! Have a wonderful weekend.

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