Your Weekly Dose of #5ThoughtsFriday: A description of what we think is important at BIAMD
  #5ThoughtsFriday
12/8/2017The
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Here are the 5 things we thought were
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The brain's complex network of neurons enables us to interpret and effortlessly navigate and interact with the world around us. But when these links are damaged due to injury or stroke, critical tasks like perception and movement can be disrupted. New research is helping scientists figure out how to harness the brain's plasticity to rewire these lost connections, an advance that could accelerate the development of neuro-prosthetics.
A new study authored by Marc Schieber, M.D., Ph.D., and Kevin Mazurek, Ph.D. with the University of Rochester Medical Center Department of Neurology and the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience, which appears in the journal Neuron, shows that very low levels of electrical stimulation delivered directly to an area of the brain responsible for motor function can instruct an appropriate response or action, essentially replacing the signals we would normally receive from the parts of the brain that process what we hear, see, and feel.

"The analogy is what happens when we approach a red light," said Schieber. "The light itself does not cause us to step on the brake, rather our brain has been trained to process this visual cue and send signals to another parts of the brain that control movement. In this study, what we describe is akin to replacing the red light with an electrical stimulation which the brain has learned to associate with the need to take an action that stops the car."

The findings could have significant implications for the development of brain-computer interfaces and neuro-prosthetics, which would allow a person to control a prosthetic device by tapping into the electrical activity of their brain.


Thoughts into movement ?  CLICK HERE.
Various correctional studies found that anywhere between 25 and 87 percent of inmates report having experienced a head injury. One study using the Traumatic Brain Injury Questionnaire conducted among 998 incarcerated men in Minnesota found that 83 percent of them had sustained one or more head injuries during their lifetimes. Gang members, in particular, were susceptible to these injuries. Some described an initiation ritual called “pumpkinhead” during which their heads were beaten until they swelled to look like pumpkins.

The numbers are even worse when it comes to female inmates. Women convicted of violent crimes are far more likely to have sustained a pre-crime brain injury than women in the general population. In one study, a high percentage of female prisoners described having 10 or more concussions prior to incarceration, often the result of domestic violence.

Given that the rate of traumatic brain injuries among prisoners is about seven times higher than it is in the general population, it’s time to consider that sustaining a head injury can put someone at higher risk of committing a crime.approaches,

Researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine say they’ve discovered a relationship between the brain and stomach that could reshape how we think about brain injuries.

According to the report published in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, a two-way relationship between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and intestinal changes may contribute to increased infections after brain injury or more severe brain damage.

In the animal study, the team says TBI was able to trigger delayed, long-term changes in the colon that create a feedback loop which can increase posttraumatic brain inflammation and brain tissue loss.

“These results indicate strong two-way interactions between the brain and the gut that may help explain the increased incidence of systemic infections after brain trauma and allow new treatment approaches,” said the lead researcher, Alan Faden, MD, the David S. Brown Professor in Trauma in the Departments of Anesthesiology, Anatomy & Neurobiology, Psychiatry, Neurology, and Neurosurgery at UMSOM, and director of the UMSOM Shock, Trauma and Anesthesiology Research Center.


T  he way to a person's head could be through their stomach? CLICK HERE
 2) What We Are Reading That You Might Enjoy...
In 2017, several of my close friends died in rapid succession. It was a very hard year, as it was for many people.

It was also a stark reminder that time is our scarcest, non-renewable resource.

With a renewed sense of urgency, I began asking myself many questions:

Were my goals my own, or simply what I thought I should want?
How much of life had I missed from underplanning or overplanning?
How could I be kinder to myself?
How could I better say “no” to the trivial many to better say “yes” to the critical few?
How could I best reassess my priorities and my purpose in this world?

To find answers, I reached out to the most impressive world-class performers in the world, ranging from wunderkinds in their 20s to icons in their 70s and 80s. No stone was left unturned.

This book contains their answers—practical and tactical advice from mentors who have found solutions. Whether you want to 10x your results, get unstuck, or reinvent yourself, someone else has traveled a similar path and taken notes.


For The Book, 

  (If you decide to buy anything mentioned in #5ThoughtsFriday, don't forget to use  Amazon Smile  and select the Brain Injury Association of Maryland as your donation beneficiary.) 
1) Quote We Are Contemplating...

If you want something you've never had, you must be willing to do something you've never done. "

  • Anonymous

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HAVE A TERRIFIC WEEKEND. 
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  Thanks for reading! Have a wonderful weekend.
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