Since the BRAIN Initiative's launch in 2013, FAS Research Development has disseminated information via this newsletter about all of the funding opportunities related to the initiative. We send this newsletter to a targeted list of faculty, including  faculty affiliates  of the  Center for Brain Science  (CBS) and the  Mind Brain Behavior  (MBB) Interfaculty Initiative. This project is being carried out in collaboration with the Center for Brain Science.  Please feel free to forward this newsletter  to interested colleagues. All Harvard University faculty and administrators may subscribe here , and recipients may unsubscribe at any time. For an archive of past newsletters, or for information about additional Research Development support (finding funding, proposal development resources, etc.), please visit the Research Development website .  
Funding Opportunity
Sponsor Deadline for Letters of Intent (requested):  30 days prior to the application deadline 
OSP Deadline:  5 business days prior to submission 
Sponsor Deadlines for Full Proposals: March 15, 2018; December 7, 2018; August 7, 2019; April 7, 2020
Award Information:   Award budgets are composed of stipends, tuition and fees, and institutional allowance. Individuals may receive up to 3 years of aggregate Kirschstein-NRSA support at the postdoctoral level, including any combination of support from institutional training grants (e.g., T32) and an individual fellowship award.The BRAIN Initiative intends to commit $1.3M per year in fiscal years 2018-2020 to fund an estimate of 20 awards per year.
   
The purpose of the BRAIN Initiative Fellows (F32) program is to enhance the research training of promising postdoctorates, early in their postdoctoral training period, who have the potential to become productive investigators in research areas that will advance the goals of the BRAIN Initiative. Applications are encouraged in any research area that is aligned with the BRAIN Initiative, including neuroethics. Applicants are expected to propose research training in an area that clearly complements their predoctoral research. Formal training in analytical tools appropriate for the proposed research is expected to be an integral component of the research training plan. In order to maximize the training potential of the F32 award, this program encourages applications from individuals who have not yet completed their terminal doctoral degree and who expect to do so within 12 months of the application due date. On the application due date, candidates may not have completed more than 12 months of postdoctoral training. By the time of award, the individual must be a citizen or a non-citizen national of the United States or have been lawfully admitted for permanent residence (i.e., possess a currently valid Permanent Resident Card USCIS Form I-551, or other legal verification of such status).

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) does not allow applicants to propose to lead an independent clinical trial, but does allow applicants to propose research experience in a clinical trial led by a sponsor or co-sponsor.

A technical assistance webinar will be held for potential applicants on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 at 1:00-2:30pm EST. The intent of the webinar is to provide an overview of the FOA and to address questions pertinent to preparing an application. Participation in the webinar, although encouraged, is optional and is not required for application submission. To obtain access information, or to submit questions or comments regarding the FOA, please email BRAIN.Initiative.Training@nih.gov at least 48 hours prior to the scheduled webinar and specify "BRAIN F32 webinar" in the subject line of the email. Access information will be sent the day before the webinar. 
News & Announcements
Questions about this newsletter or proposal submission may be directed to:

Jennifer Corby
Research Development Officer
jcorby@fas.harvard.edu | 617-495-1590

To see previous BRAIN Initiative Funding Newsletters, please visit our  email archive.
Research Development | Research Administration Services | research.fas.harvard.edu